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July 20, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
TUCSON - Sitting on a swivel bar stool near the kitchen of her home outside Tucson, Suzy Horton Ronstadt listened to the familiar words of songwriter Jimmy Webb's pop-rock classic "MacArthur Park. " Ronstadt smiled at first, then had to blink as her blue eyes welled up at the line "After all the loves of my life, you'll still be the one. " But unlike countless listeners who've shed a tear or two over the anguished romanticism of that sentiment since actor-singer Richard Harris took it to the top of the pop charts in 1968, Ronstadt has a special attachment to the song.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
After returning to "MacArthur Park" earlier this year, Jimmy Webb returns to record stores with a new album featuring some high-profile duets. Many of these songs have  become part of the fabric of popular music of the late 20th century through the original versions by artists such as Richard Harris (“MacArthur Park”), Joe Cocker (“The Moon's a Harsh Mistress”), Linda Ronstadt  (“Adios,” “Shattered”) and Glen Campbell (“Where's the Playground,  Susie,” “Honey Come Back”)
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2009 | Randy Lewis
It requires a fair amount of chutzpah for any singer to take on songs that have been definitively recorded by Frank Sinatra, Linda Ronstadt, Joe Cocker, Judy Collins, Art Garfunkel and James Taylor -- even if that singer happens to have written those songs. Fortunately, songwriter extraordinaire Jimmy Webb showed no deficit of nerve Wednesday night at Largo at the Coronet as he ran through nearly two hours' worth of some of the most elegantly crafted compositions of the last half-century.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
Too often when veteran artists revisit career-defining hits late in life it's more of a marketing move than an artistic exploration. Not in this case. Since revealing two years ago that he's been diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, the singer-guitarist and former TV show host released his well-received "Ghost on the Canvas" album and went on the road one last time for a farewell tour. Recently his family revealed that his disease has progressed to the point where he can no longer perform.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
After returning to "MacArthur Park" earlier this year, Jimmy Webb returns to record stores with a new album featuring some high-profile duets. Many of these songs have  become part of the fabric of popular music of the late 20th century through the original versions by artists such as Richard Harris (“MacArthur Park”), Joe Cocker (“The Moon's a Harsh Mistress”), Linda Ronstadt  (“Adios,” “Shattered”) and Glen Campbell (“Where's the Playground,  Susie,” “Honey Come Back”)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2013 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
On Saturday night, Levitt Pavilion at MacArthur Park was gradually melting into dark as Jimmy Webb took the stage a little after 8 p.m. and sat before a grand piano.  The personable, chatty songwriter greeted the crowd, many of whom were sitting on blankets or lawn chairs, and over nearly a dozen songs sang of long-gone love standing on the shores of Galveston, of highwaymen, sailors, dam builders and starship pilots, and excursions headed up...
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2000 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Perhaps predictably, Jimmy Webb's appearance at the Cinegrill on Monday turned out to be an evening largely devoted to his numerous hits. Webb's salad years were the late '60s and early '70s, when he was cranking out numbers recorded by artists such as Glen Campbell, Richard Harris, the Fifth Dimension and others.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2013 | By Randy Lewis, Los Angeles Times
Before becoming a widely lauded songwriter, Jimmy Webb was just another aspiring musician living in a dingy Los Angeles apartment. The Oklahoma transplant would wander from his low-rent flat in Silver Lake to a place that would inspire one of his most indelible hits, MacArthur Park. There, between Wilshire and 7th, he'd wait for his girlfriend to get off work from her job nearby. "I used to eat lunch in the park," said Webb, 66. "It was a place you could be away from the dreariness of a really bottom-scale apartment.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 1993 | RICHARD CROMELIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The late 1960s were a heady time for Jimmy Webb. The Oklahoma-born songwriter was the toast of the pop world, writing such defining hits of the era as the 5th Dimension's "Up-Up and Away," Glen Campbell's "By the Time I Get to Phoenix" and "Wichita Lineman," and Richard Harris' "MacArthur Park." At 21, Webb had a Grammy and a million dollars.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 1988 | DON HECKMAN
What makes Jimmy Webb run? What makes one of the most accomplished songwriters of the last two decades so determined to chase the ephemeral illusion of success as a performer?
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
TUCSON - Sitting on a swivel bar stool near the kitchen of her home outside Tucson, Suzy Horton Ronstadt listened to the familiar words of songwriter Jimmy Webb's pop-rock classic "MacArthur Park. " Ronstadt smiled at first, then had to blink as her blue eyes welled up at the line "After all the loves of my life, you'll still be the one. " But unlike countless listeners who've shed a tear or two over the anguished romanticism of that sentiment since actor-singer Richard Harris took it to the top of the pop charts in 1968, Ronstadt has a special attachment to the song.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2013 | By Mikael Wood
Like beauty, sappiness exists primarily in the eye of the beholder, a truism demonstrated perhaps most clearly in songs about being a parent. To people without children, the subject has led to countless instances of emotional extravagance run amok. Yet to moms and dads, raising kids can seem so profound that it justifies - indeed, necessitates! - the kind of language those very moms and dads might otherwise be inclined to dismiss. (Pop & Hiss expects we might be in for some of that language soon from Kanye West, who as you may have read became a father early Saturday.)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2013 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
On Saturday night, Levitt Pavilion at MacArthur Park was gradually melting into dark as Jimmy Webb took the stage a little after 8 p.m. and sat before a grand piano.  The personable, chatty songwriter greeted the crowd, many of whom were sitting on blankets or lawn chairs, and over nearly a dozen songs sang of long-gone love standing on the shores of Galveston, of highwaymen, sailors, dam builders and starship pilots, and excursions headed up...
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2013 | By Randy Lewis, Los Angeles Times
Before becoming a widely lauded songwriter, Jimmy Webb was just another aspiring musician living in a dingy Los Angeles apartment. The Oklahoma transplant would wander from his low-rent flat in Silver Lake to a place that would inspire one of his most indelible hits, MacArthur Park. There, between Wilshire and 7th, he'd wait for his girlfriend to get off work from her job nearby. "I used to eat lunch in the park," said Webb, 66. "It was a place you could be away from the dreariness of a really bottom-scale apartment.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
The Levitt Pavilion's annual two-pronged series of more than 100 free outdoor concerts in Los Angeles and Pasadena resumes Saturday with songwriter Jimmy Webb, who will perform at the Levitt Pavilion L.A. in MacArthur Park. Country singer and songwriter Jim Lauderdale launches the Levitt Pavilion Pasadena's performances on June 21. Highlights of the season in MacArthur Park include Gangstagrass, a bluegrass-hip-hop group scheduled for July 11, and the Omega String quartet, which will perform Pink Floyd's 1973 album “Dark Side of the Moon” in its entirety on Aug. 25. Other acts coming to Pasadena's Memorial Park include a July 12 appearance by Vieux Farka Toure, the Malian musician who mixes traditional African sounds with Delta blues music, and jazz drummer Ngudu Chancler, who will perform July 28. PHOTOS: Concerts by The Times “One of our missions is to try to present music that can bring together people of different cultures, age groups and backgrounds,” said Renee Bodie, who recently became executive director over both facilities.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2009 | Randy Lewis
It requires a fair amount of chutzpah for any singer to take on songs that have been definitively recorded by Frank Sinatra, Linda Ronstadt, Joe Cocker, Judy Collins, Art Garfunkel and James Taylor -- even if that singer happens to have written those songs. Fortunately, songwriter extraordinaire Jimmy Webb showed no deficit of nerve Wednesday night at Largo at the Coronet as he ran through nearly two hours' worth of some of the most elegantly crafted compositions of the last half-century.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 1996 | DON HECKMAN
Jimmy Webb has a dilemma. One of the most notable songwriters of his generation, the 49-year-old artist has never quite been able to convince the larger audience of his abilities as a performer. One solo album after another, produced by the likes of George Martin and Linda Ronstadt, have drawn little attention, despite Webb's easygoing manner and intriguing songs. At the opening of his four-night solo engagement at the Cinegrill on Wednesday, one of the reasons for the dilemma became clear.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 1992 | DON HECKMAN, Don Heckman writes regularly about music for Westside/Valley Calendar.
Jimmy Webb was a pop music Wunderkind at such an early age that it's a bit surprising to discover he just turned 46. Logically, that makes him a legitimate boomer--a prime name in the generation that made rock music a corporate success. But Webb, who opens a weeklong run at the Hollywood Roosevelt Cinegrill on Tuesday, was never quite accepted by the '60s and '70s knee-jerk definers of rock excellence.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2007 | Geoff Boucher
BY late 1967, Jimmy Webb was a 21-year-old wunderkind of the L.A. songwriter scene with the hits "By the Time I Get to Phoenix" by Glen Campbell and "Up, Up and Away" by the Fifth Dimension. He was invited to lend a musical hand at a fundraiser in East L.A., and there he met Richard Harris, the incorrigible Irish actor, who prowled the room like a lion with twinkling eyes. Harris wanted to sing old pub songs, and Webb played the piano, so soon they were unlikely drinking mates.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2001
As a music publisher, I was most interested in the legendary Jimmy Webb's take on Eminem ("No, Just Missing the Art of the Song," Feb. 18). While Eminem can't match Webb's tremendous abilities as a composer and his obvious melodic gifts, Eminem still managed to create a unique product that will be remembered as a timepiece for the year 2000. The irony of Webb's negative reaction to Eminem is that Webb's masterpieces "By the Time I Get to Phoenix" and "MacArthur Park" exhibited similar stream-of-consciousness lyrical poetry that Eminem's style exhibits.
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