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NEWS
July 18, 1986 | KAREN LAVIOLA, Laviola is a View intern.
It looks like a movie set. Trees border the drive with miles of white rail fences lining the fields, stables and show rings. The smell and sound of horses hangs in the air. The Flintridge Riding Club sprawls at the base of Flint Canyon, surrounded by the gold, green, charcoal-streaked San Gabriel mountains. Long-haired girls, dressed in riding breeches and boots, lovingly groom the glistening, giant beauties after hours of riding round the ring, training themselves and their horses.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
November 12, 2010 | By David Karp
One of the rarest and most sought-after fruits, the Australian finger lime, has started showing up in significant quantities at the Santa Monica farmers market, creating a minor sensation. The fruit's appearance is enough to excite wonder: from the outside it looks like a little gherkin, but when sliced in half, the round, pearlescent juice vesicles ooze out of the fruit, like citrus caviar. The clean, fresh, tart lime-lemon taste is enticing enough, but the texture, crunchy and juicy, like citrus Pop Rocks, is even more prepossessing.
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NEWS
November 3, 1993 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jimmy A. Williams, legendary riding master at Flintridge Riding Club for nearly four decades who trained horses and riders for the Olympics and other international competition, has died. He was 76. Williams died of respiratory failure Sunday at the Hospital of the Good Samaritan. He had undergone his second heart bypass surgery Oct. 4. A rider from the age of 3, Williams was named Horseman of the Year in 1960 by the American Horse Shows Assn.
BUSINESS
June 30, 2009 | Ronald D. White
Jimmy Williams planted his first seeds when he was 4 years old. Fifty-three years later, he's still playing in the dirt. It might be difficult to find someone with a heritage more deeply connected to growing things than Williams. His stretches back to a great-grandmother who, as a slave about to be shipped to a new owner in South Carolina, decided that the one thing she couldn't do without was the handful of tomato seeds she hid in a skirt pocket.
BUSINESS
June 30, 2009 | Ronald D. White
Jimmy Williams planted his first seeds when he was 4 years old. Fifty-three years later, he's still playing in the dirt. It might be difficult to find someone with a heritage more deeply connected to growing things than Williams. His stretches back to a great-grandmother who, as a slave about to be shipped to a new owner in South Carolina, decided that the one thing she couldn't do without was the handful of tomato seeds she hid in a skirt pocket.
SPORTS
December 14, 1990 | STEVE HARVEY
Who cares about the debate over the No. 1 college team? For most football fans, the main issue has been settled--mainly, who gets Floyd of Rosedale. It's Minnesota, of course. The trophy originated 55 years ago when the governors of Minnesota and Iowa wagered a real hog on the outcome of the Gopher-Hawkeye game. (As if the game itself isn't big enough.) Then, rather than pass poor Floyd back and forth every year, a bronze likeness of the blue-ribbon pig was created.
SPORTS
September 17, 1988 | JULIE BERGMAN, Special to The Times
Two of the five members of the United States equestrian show jumping squad for the 1988 Olympics are West Coast natives, Anne Kursinski of Pasadena and Lisa Jacquin of Rancho Palos Verdes. That's a bit of an upset, considering the many competitive international show jumping riders that America's East Coast traditionally produces. But Jacquin and Kursinski have one more step to climb before their participation in the events is guaranteed. They have to prove to the U.S.
FOOD
November 12, 2010 | By David Karp
One of the rarest and most sought-after fruits, the Australian finger lime, has started showing up in significant quantities at the Santa Monica farmers market, creating a minor sensation. The fruit's appearance is enough to excite wonder: from the outside it looks like a little gherkin, but when sliced in half, the round, pearlescent juice vesicles ooze out of the fruit, like citrus caviar. The clean, fresh, tart lime-lemon taste is enticing enough, but the texture, crunchy and juicy, like citrus Pop Rocks, is even more prepossessing.
SPORTS
July 15, 1989
Former Calabasas High pitcher Doug Simons threw five no-hit innings in the Orlando Twins' 6-5 win over visiting Huntsville in Southern League play Friday. Simons (2-1) lost his no-hitter in the sixth when Huntsville scored three runs. Jeff Reboulet hit a two-run double in the eighth to account for the margin of victory. Huntsville's Troy Afenir slammed a two-run homer in the ninth, but Jimmy Williams earned his 14th save by retiring Jim Kating. Dave Veres (5-8) took the loss.
NEWS
November 3, 1993 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jimmy A. Williams, legendary riding master at Flintridge Riding Club for nearly four decades who trained horses and riders for the Olympics and other international competition, has died. He was 76. Williams died of respiratory failure Sunday at the Hospital of the Good Samaritan. He had undergone his second heart bypass surgery Oct. 4. A rider from the age of 3, Williams was named Horseman of the Year in 1960 by the American Horse Shows Assn.
NEWS
July 18, 1986 | KAREN LAVIOLA, Laviola is a View intern.
It looks like a movie set. Trees border the drive with miles of white rail fences lining the fields, stables and show rings. The smell and sound of horses hangs in the air. The Flintridge Riding Club sprawls at the base of Flint Canyon, surrounded by the gold, green, charcoal-streaked San Gabriel mountains. Long-haired girls, dressed in riding breeches and boots, lovingly groom the glistening, giant beauties after hours of riding round the ring, training themselves and their horses.
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