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Jingoism

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NEWS
August 6, 2012 | By Lisa Dillman
LONDON -- Morrissey, the former frontman for the Smiths, is a little cross these days. What else is new? Veteran observers of the often-controversial singer are well accustomed to his rants on politics and various music-industry feuds, including one truly bizarre riff on Elton John. Come to think it, he might be well-positioned as a talk-show host, well equipped at repackaging rage. Right now, Morrissey is a man with a serious thorn in his side: the Olympics. The Guardian newspaper managed to to get a copy of a recent angry letter from the singer, addressed to his fan club: "I am unable to watch the Olympics due to the blustering jingoism that drenches the event.
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NEWS
August 6, 2012 | By Lisa Dillman
LONDON -- Morrissey, the former frontman for the Smiths, is a little cross these days. What else is new? Veteran observers of the often-controversial singer are well accustomed to his rants on politics and various music-industry feuds, including one truly bizarre riff on Elton John. Come to think it, he might be well-positioned as a talk-show host, well equipped at repackaging rage. Right now, Morrissey is a man with a serious thorn in his side: the Olympics. The Guardian newspaper managed to to get a copy of a recent angry letter from the singer, addressed to his fan club: "I am unable to watch the Olympics due to the blustering jingoism that drenches the event.
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OPINION
November 9, 2010 | Jonah Goldberg
Last year, when asked if he believed in American exceptionalism, President Obama responded, "I believe in American exceptionalism, just as I suspect that the Brits believe in British exceptionalism and the Greeks believe in Greek exceptionalism. " This reminded me of the wonderful scene in Pixar's "The Incredibles," in which the mom says "everyone's special" and her son replies, "Which is another way of saying no one is. " But at least the president made room for the sentiment that America is a special place, even if he chalked it up to a kind of benign provincialism.
OPINION
November 9, 2010 | Jonah Goldberg
Last year, when asked if he believed in American exceptionalism, President Obama responded, "I believe in American exceptionalism, just as I suspect that the Brits believe in British exceptionalism and the Greeks believe in Greek exceptionalism. " This reminded me of the wonderful scene in Pixar's "The Incredibles," in which the mom says "everyone's special" and her son replies, "Which is another way of saying no one is. " But at least the president made room for the sentiment that America is a special place, even if he chalked it up to a kind of benign provincialism.
OPINION
June 17, 2004
I see more and more letters to The Times (June 14) referring to "neoconservatives" or (better) "neocons," such as Deputy Defense Secretary Paul Wolfowitz. Let's stop beating around the bush. Instead, call them jingoists. The dictionary defines jingoism as "extreme chauvinism or nationalism marked especially by a belligerent foreign policy." Jim Devine Torrance
OPINION
January 23, 2008
Re "O, say, will you sing?" Opinion, Jan. 17 Timothy Garton Ash seeks to elevate our drinking-song-turned-national-anthem into the equivalent of a stirring hymn, such as "La Marseillaise." In addition to jingoism, Ash apparently suffers from tone deafness -- the range of "The Star-Spangled Banner" makes it nearly impossible to sing well. Amazingly, Ash churned out a dozen paragraphs on national anthems without mentioning one of the most beautiful songs in the world. The best (and perhaps only)
NEWS
February 22, 1991
"If war brings out the best in some--selflessness and sacrifice--it also brings out the worst. A crowd at a sporting event is particularly susceptible to the sort of stupid and cruel hysteria that hounded an Italian basketball player, Marco Lokar, from this country. Lokar chose not to wear an American-flag patch on his Seton Hall uniform. In a recent game, Lokar was jeered each time he touched the ball. When an arena full of people shouts 'U.S.A., U.S.A.
OPINION
March 3, 1991
The jingoistic sentiments expressed by many Americans aptly reinforce what I've long suspected--this is the age of smart bombs and stupid people. WILLIAM O. DECLERCQ, Rancho Palos Verdes
SPORTS
September 28, 1999 | JANET STOBART and RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Americans may remember it as one of the great moments in golf, but the U.S. victory over Europe on Sunday in the Ryder Cup was portrayed Monday on this side of the Atlantic as an orgy of jingoism and poor sportsmanship. "Joy of Ugly Victory Brings Out the Ugly American," said the Guardian, one of Britain's most sober newspapers. The tabloid Daily Mirror declared the "United Slobs of America" the winners of the three-day competition in Brookline, Mass.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 1991 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Patriotism is usually the last refuge of the country singer desperate for easy applause. If the lovelorn ballads aren't hitting the crowd in the heart and the stomping numbers aren't getting them in the gut, well, fly the flag a little and you'll get a salute in return. Johnny Cash flew the flag Saturday night at the Celebrity Theatre. The Stars and Stripes were literally hoisted beside the rotating stage while Cash intoned a patriotic poem called "Ragged Old Flag."
OPINION
January 23, 2008
Re "O, say, will you sing?" Opinion, Jan. 17 Timothy Garton Ash seeks to elevate our drinking-song-turned-national-anthem into the equivalent of a stirring hymn, such as "La Marseillaise." In addition to jingoism, Ash apparently suffers from tone deafness -- the range of "The Star-Spangled Banner" makes it nearly impossible to sing well. Amazingly, Ash churned out a dozen paragraphs on national anthems without mentioning one of the most beautiful songs in the world. The best (and perhaps only)
OPINION
June 17, 2004
I see more and more letters to The Times (June 14) referring to "neoconservatives" or (better) "neocons," such as Deputy Defense Secretary Paul Wolfowitz. Let's stop beating around the bush. Instead, call them jingoists. The dictionary defines jingoism as "extreme chauvinism or nationalism marked especially by a belligerent foreign policy." Jim Devine Torrance
NEWS
September 18, 2001 | MARTIN MILLER and GINA PICCALO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Earl Katz marched on Washington to protest the Vietnam War in the 1960s. The 59-year-old philanthropist even raised funds for a Jane Fonda documentary in which more than 100 American war veterans confessed to atrocities in the southeast Asian conflict. On Wednesday, he raised an American flag outside his Marina del Rey home. "I was a patriot then and I'm a patriot now," said Katz. "The flag represents the best of what America can be. It's not a right-wing symbol."
SPORTS
September 28, 1999 | JANET STOBART and RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Americans may remember it as one of the great moments in golf, but the U.S. victory over Europe on Sunday in the Ryder Cup was portrayed Monday on this side of the Atlantic as an orgy of jingoism and poor sportsmanship. "Joy of Ugly Victory Brings Out the Ugly American," said the Guardian, one of Britain's most sober newspapers. The tabloid Daily Mirror declared the "United Slobs of America" the winners of the three-day competition in Brookline, Mass.
OPINION
March 3, 1991
The jingoistic sentiments expressed by many Americans aptly reinforce what I've long suspected--this is the age of smart bombs and stupid people. WILLIAM O. DECLERCQ, Rancho Palos Verdes
NEWS
February 22, 1991
"If war brings out the best in some--selflessness and sacrifice--it also brings out the worst. A crowd at a sporting event is particularly susceptible to the sort of stupid and cruel hysteria that hounded an Italian basketball player, Marco Lokar, from this country. Lokar chose not to wear an American-flag patch on his Seton Hall uniform. In a recent game, Lokar was jeered each time he touched the ball. When an arena full of people shouts 'U.S.A., U.S.A.
NEWS
September 18, 2001 | MARTIN MILLER and GINA PICCALO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Earl Katz marched on Washington to protest the Vietnam War in the 1960s. The 59-year-old philanthropist even raised funds for a Jane Fonda documentary in which more than 100 American war veterans confessed to atrocities in the southeast Asian conflict. On Wednesday, he raised an American flag outside his Marina del Rey home. "I was a patriot then and I'm a patriot now," said Katz. "The flag represents the best of what America can be. It's not a right-wing symbol."
OPINION
September 16, 1990 | William J. Small, William J. Small, former president of United Press International and NBC News, is Felix Larkin Professor of Communications at Fordham University's Graduate School of Business Administration
Are America's TV networks being used in the Iraqi crisis? Does their coverage enhance or hinder our understanding of the invasion of Kuwait? Should anchormen be bopping around Baghdad, Amman, Cairo and Riyadh, or should they stay in their New York studios? Most important, is television whipping up American fervor for a military solution to Saddam Hussein? One national newspaper ran a front-page story headlined "TV Faulted as U.S. Cheerleader in Gulf."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 1991 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Patriotism is usually the last refuge of the country singer desperate for easy applause. If the lovelorn ballads aren't hitting the crowd in the heart and the stomping numbers aren't getting them in the gut, well, fly the flag a little and you'll get a salute in return. Johnny Cash flew the flag Saturday night at the Celebrity Theatre. The Stars and Stripes were literally hoisted beside the rotating stage while Cash intoned a patriotic poem called "Ragged Old Flag."
OPINION
September 16, 1990 | William J. Small, William J. Small, former president of United Press International and NBC News, is Felix Larkin Professor of Communications at Fordham University's Graduate School of Business Administration
Are America's TV networks being used in the Iraqi crisis? Does their coverage enhance or hinder our understanding of the invasion of Kuwait? Should anchormen be bopping around Baghdad, Amman, Cairo and Riyadh, or should they stay in their New York studios? Most important, is television whipping up American fervor for a military solution to Saddam Hussein? One national newspaper ran a front-page story headlined "TV Faulted as U.S. Cheerleader in Gulf."
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