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NEWS
June 10, 1989 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Rebels attacked the country's most important hydroelectric plant with mortar fire, blacking out the northern provincial capital of Jinotega and surrounding towns for several hours, government radio said Friday. The Central America plant, north of Jinotega, was damaged in the Thursday night attack, and an undetermined number of people were wounded, a Voice of Nicaragua broadcast said. Sources in Jinotega, 100 miles north of Managua, said that the Contras also blew up electrical poles along the road between the city and the plant.
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NEWS
June 10, 1989 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Rebels attacked the country's most important hydroelectric plant with mortar fire, blacking out the northern provincial capital of Jinotega and surrounding towns for several hours, government radio said Friday. The Central America plant, north of Jinotega, was damaged in the Thursday night attack, and an undetermined number of people were wounded, a Voice of Nicaragua broadcast said. Sources in Jinotega, 100 miles north of Managua, said that the Contras also blew up electrical poles along the road between the city and the plant.
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NEWS
August 27, 1985 | DAN WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
Confident of their ability to wage war on a regular basis inside Nicaragua, leaders of U.S.-backed rebels are proposing to attract civilian support with farm and health-aid programs in the battle zones. They have also reiterated a vow to stop their troops from carrying out on-the-spot executions of captured military and civilian officials of the government.
NEWS
May 29, 1986 | LYNN SMITH, Times Staff Writer
When Dorothy Callison and Mary Alice Clagett bring out the slides of their vacation, their friends should not expect to see pictures of an RV in the piney woods, secluded Hawaiian beaches or Gothic churches in Europe. This year, they decided to visit a war. Callison, an Irvine resident and an administrator at the Fullerton Arboretum, and Clagett, a nurse from Los Alamitos, returned Saturday from two weeks in Nicaragua with Witness for Peace, a controversial, war-zone watch group.
NEWS
March 27, 1985 | DAN WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
Felicia Herrera, wife of a small-time cattleman, was not especially gratified to hear that the Sandinista government was going to build a new metal-roofed plank home for her. "Soldiers of the government forced us to leave our house and then they burned it," she said. "How can I be grateful to them?" Herrera considers herself a victim of a stepped-up drive against rightist guerrillas who operate in the rugged northern mountain regions.
NEWS
May 29, 1986 | LYNN SMITH, Times Staff Writer
When Dorothy Callison and Mary Alice Clagett bring out the slides of their vacation, their friends should not expect to see pictures of an RV in the piney woods, secluded Hawaiian beaches or Gothic churches in Europe. This year, they decided to visit a war. Callison, an Irvine resident and an administrator at the Fullerton Arboretum, and Clagett, a nurse from Los Alamitos, returned Saturday from two weeks in Nicaragua with Witness for Peace, a controversial, war-zone watch group.
NEWS
April 29, 1987
U.S.-backed contras killed a 27-year-old American in an attack on a hamlet in the northern province of Jinotega, Nicaraguan radio reported. The state-run Voice of Nicaragua identified the victim as Benjamin Ernest Linder of Portland, Ore., a mechanical engineer in Nicaragua since 1985. It said he had been working with a rural-development program in Camaleona, the hamlet that was attacked. No other details were immediately available.
NEWS
December 29, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
A land mine placed by contras exploded under a government truck, killing two volunteer coffee pickers in war-torn Jinotega province, rebel radio reports and a witness said Sunday. The reports were later confirmed by the government newspaper Barricada. The incident occurred near a state coffee plantation Saturday not far from the Honduran border and 75 miles north of Managua, the contras' broadcast said.
NEWS
July 14, 1985
U.S.-backed Nicaraguan rebels claimed that they killed or wounded 312 Sandinista troops in fighting during the first week of July. The rebel Nicaraguan Democratic Force said that from July 1 to July 8, its contra fighters clashed with Nicaraguan troops 12 times in Jinotega province, 5 in Esteli and 4 in Segovia. The three northern provinces all border Honduras. It also reported 11 clashes elsewhere.
NEWS
January 4, 1989 | From Reuters
Contras killed three civilians, including a 3-year-old girl, and wounded three others in northern Nicaragua in their first attack of 1989, the Defense Ministry said Tuesday. The attack occurred Monday on the settlement of La Maranosa in northern Jinotega province, it said. An uneasy truce has been in effect since March, 1988, between Sandinista troops and the U.S.-backed Contras, but each side accuses the other of repeated violations.
NEWS
August 27, 1985 | DAN WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
Confident of their ability to wage war on a regular basis inside Nicaragua, leaders of U.S.-backed rebels are proposing to attract civilian support with farm and health-aid programs in the battle zones. They have also reiterated a vow to stop their troops from carrying out on-the-spot executions of captured military and civilian officials of the government.
NEWS
March 27, 1985 | DAN WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
Felicia Herrera, wife of a small-time cattleman, was not especially gratified to hear that the Sandinista government was going to build a new metal-roofed plank home for her. "Soldiers of the government forced us to leave our house and then they burned it," she said. "How can I be grateful to them?" Herrera considers herself a victim of a stepped-up drive against rightist guerrillas who operate in the rugged northern mountain regions.
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