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Jirayr Zorthian

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 2004 | Myrna Oliver, Times Staff Writer
Jirayr "Jerry" Zorthian , eccentric Yale-trained sculptor, painter and craftsman whose rambling Altadena ranch was described variously as "the Eagle Rock dump" and "a living work of art," has died. He was 92. Zorthian, himself known as the last bohemian, a rustic latter-day Toulouse-Lautrec or an ongoing work of performance art, died Jan. 6 at Huntington Memorial Hospital in Pasadena of congestive heart failure.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 2004 | Myrna Oliver, Times Staff Writer
Jirayr "Jerry" Zorthian , eccentric Yale-trained sculptor, painter and craftsman whose rambling Altadena ranch was described variously as "the Eagle Rock dump" and "a living work of art," has died. He was 92. Zorthian, himself known as the last bohemian, a rustic latter-day Toulouse-Lautrec or an ongoing work of performance art, died Jan. 6 at Huntington Memorial Hospital in Pasadena of congestive heart failure.
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NEWS
August 26, 1990 | BERKLEY HUDSON, Times Staff Writer
In an instant, Jirayr Zorthian scampered up a narrow iron ladder on a retaining wall at his Altadena ranch. "Shortcut," he explained as he toured his rambling, dust-covered spread in the foothills of the San Gabriel Mountains. From this vantage point, the painter-sculptor-craftsman-eccentric scanned a landscape heaped with junk: a full-sized telephone booth, heavy-equipment tires, river rocks, rusty metal slats and broken concrete--all grist for the Zorthian artistic mill.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1990 | BERKLEY HUDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an instant, Jirayr Zorthian scampered up a narrow iron ladder on a retaining wall at his Altadena ranch. "Shortcut," he explained, as he toured his rambling, dust-covered spread in the foothills of the San Gabriel Mountains. From this vantage point, the painter-sculptor-craftsman-eccentric scanned a landscape heaped with junk: a full-sized telephone booth, heavy-equipment tires, river rocks, rusty metal slats and broken concrete--all grist for the Zorthian artistic mill.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1990 | BERKLEY HUDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an instant, Jirayr Zorthian scampered up a narrow iron ladder on a retaining wall at his Altadena ranch. "Shortcut," he explained, as he toured his rambling, dust-covered spread in the foothills of the San Gabriel Mountains. From this vantage point, the painter-sculptor-craftsman-eccentric scanned a landscape heaped with junk: a full-sized telephone booth, heavy-equipment tires, river rocks, rusty metal slats and broken concrete--all grist for the Zorthian artistic mill.
NEWS
July 16, 1990 | BETTY GOODWIN
Sauna-like conditions prevailed Friday night at the Mayan nightclub, where some 500 supporters of the Museum of Contemporary Art's MOCA Contemporaries gathered. How hot was it? Robert Howard, a downtown investment banker, arrived in a suit and tie, then changed into a pair of shorts he had in the car trunk. Artist Neil Taylor, whose installation, "As We Sleep," was on view, balanced a glass of beer on the head of his buddy, Spencer Burt.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 1997 | Steve Hochman
First Kathleen Quinlan gets a supporting actress Oscar nomination as the wife of a space-stranded astronaut in "Apollo 13." Now, she and Kurt Russell co-star in "Breakdown" as desert-stranded motorists. But around the Malibu Hills home she shares with husband Bruce Abbot and two sons, Quinlan, 42, is so handy you figure that with proper tools she could have taken care of either predicament. HOMEBODY: "I just finished working for four months in London on 'Event Horizon,' a science-fiction film.
NEWS
June 3, 2001 | Patt Diroll
Jirayr "Jerry" Zorthian's primavera parties have been part of Pasadena's folklore for years. We snagged an invitation to the annual bacchanal held at his Altadena aerie last weekend. We've been told that the format for the event, which he started in 1984, never changes, but this year's bash was special. The irrepressible artist/bon vivant and his wife, Dabney--they've been married for 44 years--were celebrating his 90th birthday, which was actually April 14.
MAGAZINE
December 2, 2001 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
All these years gone, and Richard Feynman is still a force. dead more than a dozen years, but an icon nonetheless. Wander through the Caltech bookstore, and there he is, enshrined in a floor-to-ceiling photograph that takes up much of a wall. The only other prominent images in the store are those of Albert Einstein, and those are just posters.
NEWS
November 14, 2002 | Roy Rivenburg, Times Staff Writer
Picking a queen for Pasadena's wacky Doo Dah Parade is like a cross between the Miss America pageant and "The Gong Show." This year's hopefuls included a Britney Spears impersonator in drag, an inflatable doll, a 62-year-old woman using an oxygen tank and a dachshund whose hind legs had been replaced by a two-wheeled cart. Some of the spectators were also off-kilter.
NEWS
August 26, 1990 | BERKLEY HUDSON, Times Staff Writer
In an instant, Jirayr Zorthian scampered up a narrow iron ladder on a retaining wall at his Altadena ranch. "Shortcut," he explained as he toured his rambling, dust-covered spread in the foothills of the San Gabriel Mountains. From this vantage point, the painter-sculptor-craftsman-eccentric scanned a landscape heaped with junk: a full-sized telephone booth, heavy-equipment tires, river rocks, rusty metal slats and broken concrete--all grist for the Zorthian artistic mill.
NEWS
March 28, 2001 | PATT DIROLL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There's no question that Placido Domingo has been the mainspring of Los Angeles Opera on both sides of the footlights since the company was founded 15 years ago. Last week, Southern California opera lovers made it official with "Placido Domingo and Friends: The Welcome Concert & Gala," a spectacular bienvenidos that he sang in six languages in tribute to his new role as the opera's artistic director.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2001 | JANA J. MONJI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When she was a teenager, Michelle Feynman remembers playing a very Hollywood game--casting the story of her life. She picked Alan Alda to play her father. Alda is doing just that in the world premiere of Peter Parnell's "QED" at the Mark Taper Forum. Michelle's father, Richard Feynman, wasn't an ordinary man--he had worked on the Manhattan Project and was awarded the Nobel Prize for physics in 1965 for his research in quantum electrodynamics, or QED.
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