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WORLD
November 18, 2013 | By David Zucchino
KABUL, Afghanistan - This country has a president and parliament responsible for critical decisions on national security. But President Hamid Karzai, to the consternation of many who consider it a waste of time and money, has convened a traditional tribal gathering to discuss a security deal with the United States. A loya jirga , or grand council, opens here Thursday and is likely to paralyze the Afghan capital for five days as about 2,700 delegates from around the country gather to eat, drink and argue inside a tent protected by tight security.
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OPINION
December 3, 2013 | By Sarah Chayes
He's done it again. Afghan President Hamid Karzai has startled and dismayed the world. After an arduous diplomatic process to define the terms of a future international presence in Afghanistan, he balked at the last second, like a white-eyed horse in front of a jump. Karzai was on board when the language of the Security and Defense Cooperation Agreement with U.S. negotiators was finalized on Nov. 19. Less than a week later, a gathering of Afghan elders, officials and community leaders (known as a loya jirga )
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WORLD
November 24, 2013 | By David Zucchino
KABUL, Afghanistan - In a face-to-face rebuke to Afghan President Hamid Karzai, a grand council of Afghan dignitaries voted Sunday to recommend approval of a proposed 10-year security accord with the United States by the end of the year, agreeing to an American-imposed deadline. The white-bearded chairman of the advisory council, or loya jirga , told Karzai that he miscalculated by threatening a signing delay until spring. Chairman Sibghatullah Mojaddedi lectured Karzai, warning that if he delays signing, "I'll resign and leave the country.
WORLD
November 25, 2013 | By David Zucchino
KABUL, Afghanistan - From presidential candidates to grocers and spice merchants, many Afghans threw up their hands in frustration and exasperation with their elected president on Monday. They had watched Hamid Karzai on TV the day before, and many were baffled by what they saw. Karzai had brusquely rejected the recommendations of a special grand council he had personally convened to vote on whether Afghanistan should sign a security agreement with the United States. After the council, or loya jirga , enthusiastically endorsed the pact, Karzai refused to sign and launched an angry diatribe against the United States.
WORLD
November 25, 2013 | By David Zucchino
KABUL, Afghanistan - From presidential candidates to grocers and spice merchants, many Afghans threw up their hands in frustration and exasperation with their elected president on Monday. They had watched Hamid Karzai on TV the day before, and many were baffled by what they saw. Karzai had brusquely rejected the recommendations of a special grand council he had personally convened to vote on whether Afghanistan should sign a security agreement with the United States. After the council, or loya jirga , enthusiastically endorsed the pact, Karzai refused to sign and launched an angry diatribe against the United States.
WORLD
November 16, 2013 | By David Zucchino and Hashmat Baktash, This post has been updated. See below
KABUL, Afghanistan -- A suicide bomber detonated a Toyota sedan Saturday next to an Afghan army vehicle protecting the site of an upcoming national assembly expected to consider a security pact with the United States. At least six people were killed and 22 wounded. The explosion tore into the armored military vehicle on a street outside a university campus, where a five-day gathering of prominent Afghans, known as a loya jirga, is to open Thursday. The assailant was killed in addition to six Afghan civilians and security force members, said Sediq Sediqqi, a spokesman for the Afghan Ministry of Interior.
OPINION
December 3, 2013 | By Sarah Chayes
He's done it again. Afghan President Hamid Karzai has startled and dismayed the world. After an arduous diplomatic process to define the terms of a future international presence in Afghanistan, he balked at the last second, like a white-eyed horse in front of a jump. Karzai was on board when the language of the Security and Defense Cooperation Agreement with U.S. negotiators was finalized on Nov. 19. Less than a week later, a gathering of Afghan elders, officials and community leaders (known as a loya jirga )
WORLD
November 22, 2013 | By David Zucchino
KABUL, Afghanistan -- Afghanistan on Friday brushed aside an end-of-the-year U.S. deadline for signing a 10-year security pact between the two nations that would continue U.S. military and reconstruction aid after combat troops withdraw at the end of 2014. The spokesman for President Hamid Karzai, who stunned U.S. officials and many Afghans in a speech Thursday by saying the Afghan government would not sign the agreement until next spring, reiterated Friday that his nation wanted to wait.
OPINION
June 9, 2002 | J. ALEXANDER THIER, J. Alexander Thier is a consultant for the International Crisis Group in Kabul and a former United Nations official in Afghanistan.
One morning with Gen. Atiqullah Baryalai in the eastern province of Logar, a few hours south of Kabul, provides more insight into what's going on in Afghanistan than a month of meetings in the capital, with its Land Cruiser traffic jams, international military patrols and Starbucks. "Atiq," as he is called, and those like him stand in direct contrast to the aspirations of the vast majority of Afghan people.
WORLD
June 12, 2002 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The last serious presidential challenger to interim leader Hamid Karzai withdrew his candidacy Tuesday, enhancing the impression among many delegates to this nation's grand assembly that the selection had been fixed by foreign advisors and those already in power. Former President Burhanuddin Rabbani's announcement that he was bowing out led to speculation among observers and delegates that he had been promised a prestigious post.
WORLD
November 24, 2013 | By David Zucchino
KABUL, Afghanistan - In a face-to-face rebuke to Afghan President Hamid Karzai, a grand council of Afghan dignitaries voted Sunday to recommend approval of a proposed 10-year security accord with the United States by the end of the year, agreeing to an American-imposed deadline. The white-bearded chairman of the advisory council, or loya jirga , told Karzai that he miscalculated by threatening a signing delay until spring. Chairman Sibghatullah Mojaddedi lectured Karzai, warning that if he delays signing, "I'll resign and leave the country.
WORLD
November 22, 2013 | By David Zucchino
KABUL, Afghanistan -- Afghanistan on Friday brushed aside an end-of-the-year U.S. deadline for signing a 10-year security pact between the two nations that would continue U.S. military and reconstruction aid after combat troops withdraw at the end of 2014. The spokesman for President Hamid Karzai, who stunned U.S. officials and many Afghans in a speech Thursday by saying the Afghan government would not sign the agreement until next spring, reiterated Friday that his nation wanted to wait.
WORLD
November 18, 2013 | By David Zucchino
KABUL, Afghanistan - This country has a president and parliament responsible for critical decisions on national security. But President Hamid Karzai, to the consternation of many who consider it a waste of time and money, has convened a traditional tribal gathering to discuss a security deal with the United States. A loya jirga , or grand council, opens here Thursday and is likely to paralyze the Afghan capital for five days as about 2,700 delegates from around the country gather to eat, drink and argue inside a tent protected by tight security.
WORLD
November 16, 2013 | By David Zucchino and Hashmat Baktash, This post has been updated. See below
KABUL, Afghanistan -- A suicide bomber detonated a Toyota sedan Saturday next to an Afghan army vehicle protecting the site of an upcoming national assembly expected to consider a security pact with the United States. At least six people were killed and 22 wounded. The explosion tore into the armored military vehicle on a street outside a university campus, where a five-day gathering of prominent Afghans, known as a loya jirga, is to open Thursday. The assailant was killed in addition to six Afghan civilians and security force members, said Sediq Sediqqi, a spokesman for the Afghan Ministry of Interior.
WORLD
August 1, 2012 | By Alex Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times
HARIPUR, Pakistan - Suleman Khan demanded justice from the tribal elders. His wife had slept with another man, he said, and he wanted their permission to seek revenge. The elders deliberated for an hour, and then announced their verdict: Punish the man and his family any way you see fit. Within minutes, Khan and his three brothers had broken into the man's house. Only his 45-year-old mother, Shehnaz Bibi, and her teenage son were home. Armed with rifles and canes, they dragged Bibi out of the house and brought her to the village square.
WORLD
November 17, 2011 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times
President Hamid Karzai demanded Wednesday that the U.S.-led NATO force refrain from nighttime raids on Afghan residential compounds, actions that are described by the Western military as a key tactic in the fight against the Taliban and other insurgent groups. The president's call came at the opening of a three-day loya jirga , or grand council, attended by about 2,000 tribal elders, community leaders and dignitaries. The Afghan capital was under virtual lockdown for the start of the gathering, after a flurry of Taliban threats against participants.
WORLD
December 13, 2003 | Paul Watson, Times Staff Writer
The debate over Afghanistan's new constitution is shaping up to be an epic battle between its dark past and some bright, but still elusive, possibilities. The most important argument will decide who holds power: a parliament dominated by hard-line Islamic factions blamed for tearing the country apart, or U.S.-backed President Hamid Karzai, who would answer to all Afghans, said analyst Mohammed Kazem Ahang.
WORLD
May 31, 2010 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times
In the cavernous tent where Afghan President Hamid Karzai is to convene a grand tribal gathering this week, rows of chairs sit empty, waiting for turbaned elders to fill them. A youth orchestra tunes up, ready to rehearse a stirring national song. The broad street that leads to the complex echoes with the din of last-minute roadwork. After repeated delays, Afghanistan's much-touted "national consultative peace jirga ," intended to chart a course for any future political engagement with the insurgent Taliban, finally appears on track to take place.
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