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Jiri Frel

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 2006 | Ralph Frammolino, Times Staff Writer
Jiri Frel, a Czechoslovakian refugee whose eccentricities and professional controversies marked his tenure as the J. Paul Getty Museum's first antiquities curator, has died. He was 82. Frel was buried Thursday in the Pere Lachaise cemetery in Paris, according to family friends and Getty officials. Family members could not be reached for details on his death but friends said he had been in failing health for some time.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 2006 | Ralph Frammolino, Times Staff Writer
Jiri Frel, a Czechoslovakian refugee whose eccentricities and professional controversies marked his tenure as the J. Paul Getty Museum's first antiquities curator, has died. He was 82. Frel was buried Thursday in the Pere Lachaise cemetery in Paris, according to family friends and Getty officials. Family members could not be reached for details on his death but friends said he had been in failing health for some time.
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NEWS
February 14, 1987 | WILLIAM WILSON, Times Art Critic
The J. Paul Getty Museum revealed Friday that Jiri Frel, its respected curator of antiquities, was relieved of his duties in 1984 and resigned in 1986 after it was established that he had accepted donations of works to the museum "in serious violation of the museum's policies and rules." The tardy admission by the museum came after an investigative report Friday in the London Times headlined "Huge Tax Fraud Uncovered at Getty Museum."
NEWS
April 12, 1987 | CLAIRE SPIEGEL and ROBERT A. JONES, Times Staff Writers
In the basement of the J. Paul Getty museum in Malibu, there is a huge collection of antiquities that the public never sees. Thousands of Greek vases, terra-cotta figures, and bas reliefs fill shelf after shelf in the holding rooms. Some of the objects are beautiful; some are merely mundane. They have rested in quiet here for years, available only to the museum staff and occasional visiting scholars. Most large museums have similar groups of objects.
NEWS
April 12, 1987 | CLAIRE SPIEGEL and ROBERT A. JONES, Times Staff Writers
In the basement of the J. Paul Getty museum in Malibu, there is a huge collection of antiquities that the public never sees. Thousands of Greek vases, terra-cotta figures, and bas reliefs fill shelf after shelf in the holding rooms. Some of the objects are beautiful; some are merely mundane. They have rested in quiet here for years, available only to the museum staff and occasional visiting scholars. Most large museums have similar groups of objects.
NEWS
January 26, 2006 | Christopher Reynolds
Building it down to code Robert Langdon Jr., designer of the Getty Villa, died in 2004. But long before he did, he told The Times in a 1981 interview that the villa had been his toughest project. Construction required 33 permits, he said, and the long reflecting pool in the outer peristyle area had to be dug "exactly 17 7/8 inches deep. If it had been one-eighth of an inch deeper, it would have required a chain-link fence around it and a lifeguard."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2011 | By Wendy Smith, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Chasing Aphrodite: The Hunt for Looted Antiquities at the World's Richest Museum Jason Felch and Ralph Frammolino Houghton Mifflin Harcourt: 375 pp., $28 What on earth were they thinking? That's the question that comes repeatedly to mind while reading this scathing account of the Getty Museum's ethically dubious activities in the antiquities market over the course of more than a quarter-century. Expanding on their Los Angeles Times series, which made them finalists for the 2006 Pulitzer Prize for investigative reporting, Jason Felch and Ralph Frammolino show Getty staff members time and again engaging in transactions so obviously risky (as well as wrong)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 2009 | Suzanne Muchnic
Thomas Hoving, a controversial fixture of the art world who turned New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art into a hot spot during his decade as its director, helping to pioneer the blockbuster exhibitions that have transformed once-staid institutions into popular destinations, died Thursday at his New York City home. He was 78. FOR THE RECORD: Thomas Hoving obituary: In Friday's Section A, the obituary of Metropolitan Museum of Art Director Thomas Hoving said "investment banker Robert Lehman gave the museum $7 million to re-create his New York apartment, including his art collection, inside the museum.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 2012 | By Jason Felch, Los Angeles Times
When Robert E. Hecht Jr. arrived at the loading platform of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York in the fall of 1972, he was carrying a large wooden box and was escorted by an armed guard. Inside the box was perhaps the finest Greek vase to survive antiquity, a masterpiece that would soon be making headlines around the world. The Met had agreed to pay a record $1 million for the ancient work. Hecht said it had been in the private collection of a certain Lebanese gentleman.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 2005 | Jason Felch, Times Staff Writer
The J. Paul Getty Museum returned three ancient artifacts to the Italian government this week, marking the end of a legal battle over allegedly looted art that could serve as a test case for future claims by Italy against the Getty and other American museums. The Getty agreed to turn over a large vase, known as a krater, painted more than 2,300 years ago by the Greek painter Asteas, after settling a claim filed by the U.S. attorney's office in Los Angeles on behalf of the Italian government.
NEWS
February 14, 1987 | WILLIAM WILSON, Times Art Critic
The J. Paul Getty Museum revealed Friday that Jiri Frel, its respected curator of antiquities, was relieved of his duties in 1984 and resigned in 1986 after it was established that he had accepted donations of works to the museum "in serious violation of the museum's policies and rules." The tardy admission by the museum came after an investigative report Friday in the London Times headlined "Huge Tax Fraud Uncovered at Getty Museum."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 1997 | Suzanne Muchnic
One Friday afternoon in January 1980, Stephen D. Rountree faced a decision. Preparing to leave his administrative position at Occidental College, he had to choose between two job offers: vice president of Scripps College, a prestigious women's school in Claremont, and deputy director of the J. Paul Getty Museum. "Scripps was something I really knew and understood. I could get a nice little house in Claremont and be very comfortable," Rountree said.
OPINION
April 19, 1987 | Morris Philipson, Morris Philipson is the director of the University of Chicago Press and author of the new novel, "Somebody Else's Life" (Harper & Row)
Once upon a time--about 50 years ago--when there were fewer rich people and fewer poor people because there were fewer people, a portly Muslim sultan worth his weight in diamonds was the old Aga Khan. By now two generations have grown up too late to see the newsreel footage of that religious leader (who lived most of the time in France and never missed an important horse race in England) being celebrated by his Third World followers.
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