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ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2003 | Steve Carney, Special to The Times
Hoping he can bring the same success to the entire network as he has to its popular "Marketplace" program, Minnesota Public Radio this week promoted one of the show's creators to nurture new series and help the company capitalize on its West Coast properties, including KPCC-FM (89.3). As the new vice president of programming, "Marketplace" executive producer J.J.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2003 | Steve Carney, Special to The Times
Hoping he can bring the same success to the entire network as he has to its popular "Marketplace" program, Minnesota Public Radio this week promoted one of the show's creators to nurture new series and help the company capitalize on its West Coast properties, including KPCC-FM (89.3). As the new vice president of programming, "Marketplace" executive producer J.J.
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BUSINESS
June 25, 2005 | From Associated Press
Public radio show "Marketplace" dropped a San Diego-based financial advisor as a commentator after concluding that he lifted language from online magazine Slate. Gabriel Wisdom had been providing commentaries for the nationally distributed program since 2003. His last appearance on June 13 mentioned the economic theories of author Michael Panzner. Executive producer J.J.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2004 | Greg Braxton, Times Staff Writer
Sandra Tsing Loh's commentaries on KCRW-FM (89.9) bear little resemblance to the overtly outrageous routines that led to Bubba the Love Sponge's firing last week. But after she uttered a four-letter obscenity on the air Sunday, Loh joined the Florida shock jock in the ranks of radio personalities who have had their shows yanked off the air.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 2008 | Deborah Netburn, Times Staff Writer
It's somewhere past 6 p.m. in the middle of the gas-guzzling commute home from work, and certain Southland residents with certain types of radio presets are used to passing this time pleasantly enough with "All Things Considered" on KPCC-FM (89.3). Except today (and for the last couple of weeks), people are not so interested in the first woman who ran for president in 1872 or this week's installment of "This I Believe." They want the juicy stuff -- news about Fed Chairman Ben S.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 1999 | KEVIN BAXTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Business, like nuclear physics and brain surgery, was long considered a subject beyond the grasp of common folk. And many are the vested interests that wanted to keep it that way. As long as John Q. Public was unable to tell a hedge fund from a hedgerow, armies of well-paid financial advisors were guaranteed employment.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 1997 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Several weeks after Michael Jackson's demotion from weekdays to weekends on KABC-AM (790), people were still calling in to vent. "He was the only person I listened to in the morning," said Andrea Sher of Studio City. "I have nothing against Ronn Owens but he should have been put in another spot. Now I'm listening to music."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2011 | JAMES RAINEY
The voice coming out of the radio sounded folksy and a bit worn-out, speaking words so honest they almost made you feel embarrassed to be listening in. But all Don Holzschuh, a trucker from Iowa, did was tell the truth: The bills could pile up so high, sometimes it was hard to make it on his income of about $50,000 a year. When interviewer Kai Ryssdal suggested the recession had been over for a couple of years, Holzschuh snorted out a short chuckle. "I'm one nostril above the water," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2001 | SEAN MITCHELL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Is Los Angeles the public radio capital of the nation? And if not, will it be one day? Anyone who seeks out local and national public (that is, noncommercial) radio programs such as "This American Life," "A Prairie Home Companion" and "Le Show") realizes that we have five major public stations on the FM dial in Southern California. Most big cities have only one or two. (New York has four.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 1998 | KEVIN BAXTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rudy Maxa is a witty, quick-talking fellow with a pleasant, round face, a gentle disposition and a slightly balding pate. And frequent-flier mileage to die for. After all, they don't call him "The Savvy Traveler" for nothing. "I could not pay for another airline ticket," he says with a smile, "for a long time." Which is a good thing, since airline travel is a big part of Maxa's life.
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