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BUSINESS
March 23, 1992 | ANNE MICHAUD
JM Associates of Irvine teaches 'rainmaking' to legal firms, which are under intense pressure to increase billings. Last year, Leland McKenzie, the fatherly senior partner on television's "L.A. Law," announced that he was going to stop taking so many cases and instead spend his time "rainmaking." In that TV moment, viewers were clued in to an activity that consumes more and more of the workday for real-life lawyers: drumming up new business.
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BUSINESS
August 27, 1998 | Bloomberg News
Cendant Corp. said it reached an agreement with JM to build 30 hotels as part of the company's effort to increase ethnic diversity in its lodging business. Wichita, Kan.-based JM plans to use McAfee Manufacturing Co., also based in Wichita, to build the Howard Johnson, Days Inn and Ramada hotels by mid-2003. The first five hotels would be built in and around Wichita and are expected to open by June 1999. Other details weren't disclosed.
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BUSINESS
August 27, 1998 | Bloomberg News
Cendant Corp. said it reached an agreement with JM to build 30 hotels as part of the company's effort to increase ethnic diversity in its lodging business. Wichita, Kan.-based JM plans to use McAfee Manufacturing Co., also based in Wichita, to build the Howard Johnson, Days Inn and Ramada hotels by mid-2003. The first five hotels would be built in and around Wichita and are expected to open by June 1999. Other details weren't disclosed.
BUSINESS
March 23, 1992 | ANNE MICHAUD
JM Associates of Irvine teaches 'rainmaking' to legal firms, which are under intense pressure to increase billings. Last year, Leland McKenzie, the fatherly senior partner on television's "L.A. Law," announced that he was going to stop taking so many cases and instead spend his time "rainmaking." In that TV moment, viewers were clued in to an activity that consumes more and more of the workday for real-life lawyers: drumming up new business.
BUSINESS
June 17, 2003 | Hanah Cho, Times Staff Writer
Less than six years after emerging from bankruptcy protection, Clothestime Stores Inc., the Anaheim-based discount apparel chain, is being forced back into U.S. Bankruptcy Court. Three Los Angeles-area apparel manufacturers that say they are owed more than $700,000 in missed payments filed an involuntary bankruptcy petition Friday against the retailer, which sells mostly juniors apparel and accessories.
BUSINESS
January 10, 1993 | TED JOHNSON, TOM McQUEENEY and DALLAS JACKSON / Los Angeles Times
David S. Samuels president and chief executive officer, State of the Art Inc., a software company "We are a nationally distributed company. While a significant portion of our revenue happens to come from the California marketplace, we have distribution from coast to coast. The impact we've seen over the past two years (from the recession) has been limited because only a portion of our revenue is locally based. We're well leveraged. . . .
BUSINESS
January 29, 2005 | James F. Peltz, Times Staff Writer
Could Procter & Gamble Co.'s blockbuster plan to buy Gillette Co. ultimately shave consumers' wallets? By merging their production and marketing muscle in a $53-billion transaction confirmed Friday, the manufacturers hope to stifle demands from supermarkets, drugstore chains and mass-merchandisers for lower prices, some analysts said. And that same desire for pricing clout -- as well as the need to beef up in the face of a super-sized rival -- could lead to marriages among other household products firms.
BUSINESS
January 10, 1993 | TOM McQUEENEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Orange County business executives think the county's economic climate caused frostbite in 1992. When asked how their own businesses weathered the year, however, most sounded as if they were protected by massive smudge pots. Seven out of 10 business leaders queried in an informal survey said the county's economy got worse or much worse during 1992. Yet almost the same number said their own firms' financial strength was better--or much better--last year than in 1991. Why the discrepancy?
BUSINESS
June 9, 1998 | BOB HOWARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Developers are scheduled to break ground today on a $40-million industrial project in Valencia, underscoring how the growing Santa Clarita Valley community is on track to eclipse some of its San Fernando Valley neighbors as an industrial center. The new project is Vista Business Park, which will eventually include 730,000 square feet of industrial space on 36 acres in Valencia Commerce Center at the intersection of Interstate 5 and California 126.
BUSINESS
April 4, 2006 | Jerry Hirsch, Times Staff Writer
Warehouse food retailer Smart & Final Inc. is test marketing a new product -- itself. The City of Commerce-based chain said Monday that it planned to hire legal and financial advisors to help it determine "strategic alternatives," Wall Street-speak that usually means selling the company. Analysts say the 250-store chain has been hampered by a majority shareholder that has shown little interest in the business but a sale could position Smart & Final for significant growth.
BUSINESS
February 16, 2005 | Melinda Fulmer, Times Staff Writer
At WinCo, customers bag their own groceries. There are no butchers or bakers. And credit cards aren't accepted. If you're a shopper, you might view those as shortcomings. If you're an employee, you might consider them benefits. WinCo Foods Inc., an employee-owned discount warehouse chain with 47 jumbo-sized supermarkets in five Western states, claims it has figured out how to compete with Wal-Mart Stores Inc. on prices and with nearly all players in the grocery business on wages.
BUSINESS
August 16, 1992 | ANNE MICHAUD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mid-career lawyers are changing jobs more frequently these days, and often the new position is at the helm of their own firm. By the dozens, law partners and senior associates are leaving large, prestigious law firms and creating specialty or "boutique" firms. The reasons are many: for more operational control, to avoid inequitable distribution of income, to select colleagues of their choice and to escape the increasing overtime expected more frequently by large firms.
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