Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJo Ann Mapson
IN THE NEWS

Jo Ann Mapson

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 21, 1992 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two Orange County writers--Katherine Vaz of Irvine and Jo-Ann Mapson of Costa Mesa--have parlayed the novels they wrote for their master's theses into publishing contracts. Vaz, a 1991 graduate of the UC Irvine Program in Writing, sold the hardcover and paperback rights to her first novel, "Saudade," to Ballantine Books.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BOOKS
January 4, 2004 | Michael Harris, Michael Harris is a regular contributor to Book Review.
Life goes on, and then it goes on some more. A novel may impose a beginning and an ending on the flow of events, but even a character's death doesn't mean his or her story is over. "Goodbye, Earl" is supposed to be an ending -- the third volume of Jo-Ann Mapson's trilogy about hard-luck women who find sustenance and sisterhood on a 40-acre flower farm on California's Central Coast -- but it's clear, after we turn the last page, that Mapson could go on writing about these people forever.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 2000 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jo-Ann Mapson, the best-selling author of five novels, including "Hank & Chloe" and "The Wilder Sisters," conducted her final Orange County book signing last week--at least it was her last signing as an Orange County resident. Mapson is joining a handful of other notable Orange County authors--T. Jefferson Parker among the most recent--who have pulled up stakes over the past decade and moved out of the county.
BOOKS
January 19, 2003 | Michael Harris, Michael Harris is a regular contributor to Book Review.
People of my gender call novels such as Jo-Ann Mapson's "chick books" because they focus on love, family and relationships rather than on, say, weapons of mass destruction. We tend to dismiss them as soap operas with covers -- as if the plot of the typical guy book (FBI profiler plays cat-and-mouse games with serial killer) dealt with a wider and deeper range of human experience. Of course, the opposite is true.
NEWS
July 12, 1994 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a handful of rave reviews in tow, Jo-Ann Mapson has left on the second leg of a 22-city publicity tour for her new contemporary Western novel "Blue Rodeo." The Costa Mesa author's itinerary during the next two weeks includes stops in Boston and New York followed by sweeps through Georgia, Alabama, Louisiana and Tennessee. On the whole, however, she'd rather be in Costa Mesa. "Writers are hermits," Mapson said before leaving Friday. "Writers like to stay home.
BOOKS
May 6, 1990 | SONJA BOLLE
One of the virtuoso techniques of short-story writing is to make the ordinary seem extraordinary. Jo-Ann Mapson exercises a variation on this technique. The 13 stories in this collection focus on ordinary people in ordinary situations--housewives, hospital patients, college students--and cut recognizable, short-story-size slices from their daily lives.
NEWS
April 28, 1996
In your April 2 story about the spring edition of Manuscripts at Newport Beach Central Library, the program's co-chairs portray their twice-a-year series as "an alternative to the celebrity-oriented monthly Round Table West author luncheons at the Balboa Bay Club." We are always delighted to hear about programs such as the library's, with which we share a common cause to inspire young people to read more, encourage people to write and foster an appreciation to the literary arts. Frankly, the literary arts need all the help they can get today!
NEWS
May 3, 1996 | SARA DAVIDSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jo-Ann Mapson writes about odd couples, people who attain emotional and sexual heights despite all odds. Her couples are as baffling and compelling as the bumble bee, which has tissue-thin wings and a heavy round body and by the laws of aerodynamics should not fly. But it does.
NEWS
July 26, 1996 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Costa Mesa author Jo-Ann Mapson received good news from Hollywood this week. CBS and Warner Television have exercised their movie option on her 1994 novel, "Blue Rodeo," a love story between two middle-age people in a small New Mexico town. Pre-production is underway. Filming will begin Aug. 5 in Tucson, with Ann-Margret starring as Margaret Yearwood, a divorced mother struggling to overcome emotional estrangement from her teenage son, Peter.
NEWS
July 10, 2001 | MICHAEL HARRIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
What could these women possibly have in common? Ness is a 6-foot African American blacksmith whose last boyfriend infected her with HIV. Nance is a Southern belle who couldn't live with a self-centered journalist but can't get him out of her mind. Beryl spent five years in prison for stabbing her abusive husband. (Her kitchen knife didn't kill him, though;he slipped on spilled beer and cracked his head.) Obviously, each woman is disillusioned with the male of the species.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 2000 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jo-Ann Mapson, the best-selling author of five novels, including "Hank & Chloe" and "The Wilder Sisters," conducted her final Orange County book signing last week--at least it was her last signing as an Orange County resident. Mapson is joining a handful of other notable Orange County authors--T. Jefferson Parker among the most recent--who have pulled up stakes over the past decade and moved out of the county.
NEWS
June 10, 1999 | GEORGIA JONES-DAVIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Watch your back, Larry McMurtry. There's another cowpoke in town who, for a good while now, has been steadily fixing to pick up where you left off. Her name's Jo-Ann Mapson and she's getting pretty fast on the draw. Trouble-ridden romance, as hurtful and risky as a green horse, is the subject Mapson has corralled. "The Wilder Sisters," her newest novel, travels along the same fence line as her other books.
NEWS
July 26, 1996 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Costa Mesa author Jo-Ann Mapson received good news from Hollywood this week. CBS and Warner Television have exercised their movie option on her 1994 novel, "Blue Rodeo," a love story between two middle-age people in a small New Mexico town. Pre-production is underway. Filming will begin Aug. 5 in Tucson, with Ann-Margret starring as Margaret Yearwood, a divorced mother struggling to overcome emotional estrangement from her teenage son, Peter.
NEWS
May 20, 1996 | MICHAEL HARRIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Shadow Ranch" is as romantic as any drugstore bustier-buster, but it masks its intentions with tragic events, a comic style, a cast of realistically dysfunctional characters and an acutely detailed Southern California background. Like Jo-Ann Mapson's first two novels, "Hank & Chloe" and "Blue Rodeo," this is a love story for grown-ups, propelled by the attraction between improbable lovers.
NEWS
May 3, 1996 | SARA DAVIDSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jo-Ann Mapson writes about odd couples, people who attain emotional and sexual heights despite all odds. Her couples are as baffling and compelling as the bumble bee, which has tissue-thin wings and a heavy round body and by the laws of aerodynamics should not fly. But it does.
NEWS
March 4, 1993 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The title characters in "Hank & Chloe," Jo-Ann Mapson's gritty and sexy Orange County-set first novel, are an unlikely twosome. Hank is an untenured professor of folklore and mythology at an unnamed Orange County community college (read Orange Coast).
BOOKS
January 19, 2003 | Michael Harris, Michael Harris is a regular contributor to Book Review.
People of my gender call novels such as Jo-Ann Mapson's "chick books" because they focus on love, family and relationships rather than on, say, weapons of mass destruction. We tend to dismiss them as soap operas with covers -- as if the plot of the typical guy book (FBI profiler plays cat-and-mouse games with serial killer) dealt with a wider and deeper range of human experience. Of course, the opposite is true.
NEWS
April 28, 1996
In your April 2 story about the spring edition of Manuscripts at Newport Beach Central Library, the program's co-chairs portray their twice-a-year series as "an alternative to the celebrity-oriented monthly Round Table West author luncheons at the Balboa Bay Club." We are always delighted to hear about programs such as the library's, with which we share a common cause to inspire young people to read more, encourage people to write and foster an appreciation to the literary arts. Frankly, the literary arts need all the help they can get today!
NEWS
July 12, 1994 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a handful of rave reviews in tow, Jo-Ann Mapson has left on the second leg of a 22-city publicity tour for her new contemporary Western novel "Blue Rodeo." The Costa Mesa author's itinerary during the next two weeks includes stops in Boston and New York followed by sweeps through Georgia, Alabama, Louisiana and Tennessee. On the whole, however, she'd rather be in Costa Mesa. "Writers are hermits," Mapson said before leaving Friday. "Writers like to stay home.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|