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Jo Ann Parks

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December 1, 1991 | DAVID FERRELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the days after a pre-dawn fire destroyed their home, killing their three small children, Jo Ann and Ronald Parks received a huge outpouring of support. Friends and well-wishers--many from their own blue-collar community in Bell--sent cards, flowers and, most of all, cash. The tally of donations reached nearly $35,000. But even as sympathizers were opening their hearts, arson and homicide detectives were quietly opening a case.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1993 | CONSELLA A. LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 26-year-old woman was found guilty Tuesday of killing her three small children in their Bell home by setting two fires in 1989. "Fire was the weapon of choice to execute her children," said Los Angeles County Deputy Dist. Atty. Dinko Bozanich. Jo Ann Parks faces the death penalty or a life sentence without the possibility of parole for committing the multiple murders. The Norwalk Superior Court jury took about two days to reach its decision after a six-week trial.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1993 | CONSELLA A. LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 26-year-old woman was found guilty Tuesday of killing her three small children in their Bell home by setting two fires in 1989. "Fire was the weapon of choice to execute her children," said Los Angeles County Deputy Dist. Atty. Dinko Bozanich. Jo Ann Parks faces the death penalty or a life sentence without the possibility of parole for committing the multiple murders. The Norwalk Superior Court jury took about two days to reach its decision after a six-week trial.
NEWS
December 1, 1991 | DAVID FERRELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the days after a pre-dawn fire destroyed their home, killing their three small children, Jo Ann and Ronald Parks received a huge outpouring of support. Friends and well-wishers--many from their own blue-collar community in Bell--sent cards, flowers and, most of all, cash. The tally of donations reached nearly $35,000. But even as sympathizers were opening their hearts, arson and homicide detectives were quietly opening a case.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 1989 | JOHN JOHNSON, Times Staff Writer
Three small children died early Sunday in a fire that destroyed a house in Bell. Jo Ann Parks, their mother, escaped through a window with burns on her face and hands after trying unsuccessfully to reach the bedrooms where the children were trapped. Authorities identified the victims as Jessica Amber Parks, 1, and her sister RoAnn, 2, who were found in one bedroom. Ronald Edward Parks III, 4, was found in the closet of a second bedroom. The fire erupted at 12:25 a.m. Maria del Flores, who lived nearby, said it sounded "like a bomb" going off in the neighborhood on Sherman Way. Reports indicated that it was the screams of the children that awakened Jo Ann Parks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 1989 | JAMES M. GOMEZ and RICK HOLGUIN, Times Staff Writers
The fenced-in back yard, shaded by tall eucalyptus trees, was a world away from the temporary homes that Ronald and JoAnn Parks and their three children had lived in since January. When they moved into the garage apartment in the 6900 block of Sherman Way in Bell less than two weeks ago, they told neighbors that they were ready to settle down after a string of troubles that began a year ago. But on Monday, the toy tractor, the lawn chairs and the tricycle--symbols of a new life in the suburban city for the young family--were left near the eucalyptus trees, blackened by a weekend fire that killed all three children.
NEWS
March 14, 1991 | BEVERLY BEYETTE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The scene onstage: "Charles Henderson," a Xerox manager, is explaining to "Gloria Reed," a young black engineer, his decision to name another employee--a white man like himself--to a project to which she had hoped to be assigned. And, oh yes, one other thing: Gloria is going to be sharing a work space with a clerical worker, who also happens to be a black woman. Was this art imitating life? If so, the Xerox Corp. wants to make some changes.
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