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Jo Anne Van Tilburg

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BOOKS
February 25, 1990
Self-serving speciousness is the flavor of Jo Anne Van Tilburg's criticism of the Jan. 21 review of Thor Heyerdahl's book "Easter Island: The Mystery Solved." She discounts too much the investigations carried on at length by this intrepid Norwegian ethnologist, and then refutes Pavel's theory--which was proven by researchers! Having disposed of any and all other authorities on this fascinating islet, she then points the way toward understanding "scientific literature." Obviously, to unfold the Easter Island mystery one must consult Dr. Jo Anne!
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 1996 | JOHN CANALIS
Archeologist Jo Anne Van Tilburg, whose research has unraveled many of the mysteries surrounding the haunting statues of Easter Island, will lecture on her findings Dec. 8 at Southern California College. Van Tilburg developed the leading theory explaining how pre-Columbian Polynesians were able to carry colossal stones, weighing up to 89 tons, over the small South Pacific island 2,300 miles west of Chile, using devices similar to contemporary rocket-launch gantries.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 1996 | JOHN CANALIS
Archeologist Jo Anne Van Tilburg, whose research has unraveled many of the mysteries surrounding the haunting statues of Easter Island, will lecture on her findings Dec. 8 at Southern California College. Van Tilburg developed the leading theory explaining how pre-Columbian Polynesians were able to carry colossal stones, weighing up to 89 tons, over the small South Pacific island 2,300 miles west of Chile, using devices similar to contemporary rocket-launch gantries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1995 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the end, it took Space Age technology to unravel the secrets of Stone Age technology. That is how Malibu archeologist Jo Anne Van Tilburg apparently has solved a centuries-old puzzle over how primitive Polynesians were able to push and shove mysterious stone statues weighing as much as 89 tons all over rugged Easter Island.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1995 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the end, it took Space Age technology to unravel the secrets of Stone Age technology. That is how Malibu archeologist Jo Anne Van Tilburg apparently has solved a centuries-old puzzle over how primitive Polynesians were able to push and shove mysterious stone statues weighing as much as 89 tons all over rugged Easter Island.
OPINION
March 11, 2009
Re "Power plant and hunters at odds," March 7 The Inyo County Planning Commission permit application by Coso Operating Co. seeking to pump water from an aquifer that is the "lifeblood" of the Little Lake Ranch hunting club is a disaster in the making. Although Little Lake Ranch is private property, the owners are not the only concerned citizens in this matter. Archaeologists and historians are among many stakeholders in the rich past of Little Lake and the fragile ecology of the California desert.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 1996 | JOHN CANALIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Archeologist Jo Anne Van Tilburg, whose research has unraveled many of the mysteries surrounding the haunting statues of Easter Island, will lecture on her findings Dec. 8 at Southern California College. Van Tilburg developed the leading theory explaining how pre-Columbian Polynesians were able to carry colossal stones, weighing up to 89 tons, over the small South Pacific island 2,300 miles west of Chile, using devices similar to contemporary rocket-launch gantries. "She is quite renowned," said Josephine M. Isenberg, publicity chairwoman for the Archaeological Institute of America's Orange County Society, which is sponsoring the event.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 1993 | NONA YATES
Alzheimer's disease, characterized by memory loss and disorientation, strikes an estimated 4 million elderly Americans each year. The Los Angeles chapter of the Alzheimer's Assn. and other organizations will be sponsoring a conference on the disease Thursday and Friday. There will be more than 75 sessions on topics ranging from ethical dilemmas in treatment to the Clinton health care plan. Experts present will include UC Irvine researcher Carl W. Cotman, Msgr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 1985
In the aftermath of the Malibu brush fires, I write to commend the quality of organization, efficiency and good-natured help provided our family by the firefighters of Los Angeles County and neighboring cities. Our home is perched above the coast on Sweetwater Mesa. To the north of us lie about 100 or more acres of virgin brush. Over the years, we have grown to love the unpredictability of the winds that fill the canyons, the sound of coyotes and the soaring flight of hawks. Deer, raccoon and birds of every description are our neighbors.
TRAVEL
December 18, 2011
I enjoyed the article about snowshoeing in the Travel section ["Hey, Waffle Feet, Mom Knows Best" by Sara Lessley, Dec. 11]. Organizations have found that by holding a snowshoeing activity, a nonprofit can organize a successful fundraising event. The participants walk over white flakes rather than walk or run over hard ground. Sue Chehrenegar Los Angeles Pasadena history I am a mystified that Christopher Reynolds failed to mention the Pasadena Museum of History in his close-up on Pasadena ["Marvelous Magnitude," Nov. 27]
BOOKS
February 25, 1990
Self-serving speciousness is the flavor of Jo Anne Van Tilburg's criticism of the Jan. 21 review of Thor Heyerdahl's book "Easter Island: The Mystery Solved." She discounts too much the investigations carried on at length by this intrepid Norwegian ethnologist, and then refutes Pavel's theory--which was proven by researchers! Having disposed of any and all other authorities on this fascinating islet, she then points the way toward understanding "scientific literature." Obviously, to unfold the Easter Island mystery one must consult Dr. Jo Anne!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2002 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Why do Hollywood knuckleheads keep calling Easter Island's famous stone statues "tiki heads"? That question had representatives of the remote Pacific outpost scratching their heads Thursday as they protested what they say is the latest Tinseltown tiki production--an upcoming "Laverne & Shirley" television special. The prime-time one-hour show "Entertainment Tonight Presents: Laverne & Shirley Together Again" will air on ABC on May 7.
NEWS
August 10, 2004 | Keith David Hamm, Special to The Times
Deep in the Topatopa Mountains above Ojai, a red snake slithers across a sandstone outcrop. The reptile hasn't moved from the rock where a Chumash Indian painted it centuries ago. Now a quartet of researchers is working to ensure the snake image never leaves. The Santa Barbara-based Rock Art Documentation Group calls the site Serpent Cave.
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