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Jo Franklin Trout

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 1989
The long arm of the Israeli censor, having succeeded in blocking from commercial network news the images of the Palestinian uprising against Israeli occupation, is now reaching out in an attempt to kill "Days of Rage: The Young Palestinians," a documentary by Jo Franklin-Trout (Howard Rosenberg's April 22 column, "PBS Backs Away From Palestinian Documentary"). The disgrace is that PBS seems to be acquiescing in such an outrage and is making feeble excuses for not showing the documentary.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 1989 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Rarely has a television program been as bitterly savaged before it aired. Yet rarely has there been a program with a topic as volatile as this one. The rage directed at Jo Franklin-Trout and her heavily tilted, but still-valuable and intensely powerful documentary about the Palestinian uprising in the Israeli-occupied West Bank and Gaza Strip has almost obscured the program itself.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 1989
Regarding " 'Rage' Documentary Puts PBS in Its Own Mideast Standoff," Howard Rosenberg's July 12 column about "Days of Rage": If PBS and public television stations were, as Rosenberg suggested, so afraid of controversy that might offend funding sources and potential donors, why would KCET and most PBS stations have carried a 45-minute Jim Lehrer interview with PLO Chairman Yasser Arafat or a half-hour conversation with King Hussein of Jordan earlier...
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 1989 | DIANE HAITHMAN, Times Staff Writer
The producer of a highly controversial pro-Palestinian documentary slated to air next week found herself embroiled in still more controversy this week when conflicting reports of her involvement with an organization supported by Arabs began to surface. Jo Franklin-Trout, producer of "Days of Rage: The Young Palestinians," scheduled for broadcast Wednesday at 9 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 1989 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
"Total astonishment." That was her reaction, Jo Franklin-Trout said, upon learning this week that her sure-to-be-controversial documentary, "Days of Rage: The Young Palestinians," had again been postponed by PBS. Showing the uprising in the Israeli-occupied West Bank and Gaza Strip from a strong Palestinian perspective (the Israeli government's view is excluded), her 90-minute program was completed for PBS almost eight months ago and has already aired abroad. But not on PBS. "It was originally scheduled for December, then rescheduled for January, then rescheduled several other times," Franklin-Trout said from her Washington office.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 1989 | DIANE HAITHMAN, Times Staff Writer
The producer of a highly controversial pro-Palestinian documentary slated to air next week found herself embroiled in still more controversy this week when conflicting reports of her involvement with an organization supported by Arabs began to surface. Jo Franklin-Trout, producer of "Days of Rage: The Young Palestinians," scheduled for broadcast Wednesday at 9 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 1989 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Rarely has a television program been as bitterly savaged before it aired. Yet rarely has there been a program with a topic as volatile as this one. The rage directed at Jo Franklin-Trout and her heavily tilted, but still-valuable and intensely powerful documentary about the Palestinian uprising in the Israeli-occupied West Bank and Gaza Strip has almost obscured the program itself.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 1989 | SHAUNA SNOW, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Public TV stations won't be scared away from the documentary "Days of Rage: The Young Palestinians," despite claims that it is biased in favor of the Palestinians and may have been covertly funded by an Arab group, says Public Broadcasting System spokeswoman Mary Jane McKinven. She said 25 of the 26 major-market public stations will carry the 90-minute documentary Wednesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 1989 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
We get letters. . . . You noted that PBS was reluctant to broadcast Jo Franklin Trout's documentary, "Days of Rage," without a panel discussion to balance the presentation with an Israeli perspective. However, CBS apparently did not feel any compunction about its "West 57th" segment titled "The Palestinians: Dirty Business." The message the media send with this behavior is that the Palestinian perspective cannot be presented alone. Whereas it is acceptable to bash Palestinians, Israel cannot be criticized without the opportunity to reply.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 1989 | RONALD L. SOBLE, Times Staff Writer
The newly opened Loews Santa Monica Beach Hotel has joined several Los Angeles synagogues which have decided not to be the site of the first private preview in this country of the controversial documentary, "Days of Rage: The Young Palestinians." Joel Gayman, a Los Angeles publicist who was attempting to arrange the showing of the documentary made for the Public Broadcasting Service, said he "is saddened by the lack of commitment" on the part of the city's Jewish community and the area's newest hotel to grapple with the film's thorny issues.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 1989
Regarding " 'Rage' Documentary Puts PBS in Its Own Mideast Standoff," Howard Rosenberg's July 12 column about "Days of Rage": If PBS and public television stations were, as Rosenberg suggested, so afraid of controversy that might offend funding sources and potential donors, why would KCET and most PBS stations have carried a 45-minute Jim Lehrer interview with PLO Chairman Yasser Arafat or a half-hour conversation with King Hussein of Jordan earlier...
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 1989
The long arm of the Israeli censor, having succeeded in blocking from commercial network news the images of the Palestinian uprising against Israeli occupation, is now reaching out in an attempt to kill "Days of Rage: The Young Palestinians," a documentary by Jo Franklin-Trout (Howard Rosenberg's April 22 column, "PBS Backs Away From Palestinian Documentary"). The disgrace is that PBS seems to be acquiescing in such an outrage and is making feeble excuses for not showing the documentary.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 1989 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
"Total astonishment." That was her reaction, Jo Franklin-Trout said, upon learning this week that her sure-to-be-controversial documentary, "Days of Rage: The Young Palestinians," had again been postponed by PBS. Showing the uprising in the Israeli-occupied West Bank and Gaza Strip from a strong Palestinian perspective (the Israeli government's view is excluded), her 90-minute program was completed for PBS almost eight months ago and has already aired abroad. But not on PBS. "It was originally scheduled for December, then rescheduled for January, then rescheduled several other times," Franklin-Trout said from her Washington office.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 1986 | NANCY MILLS
When the Challenger space shuttle blew up in January, Jo Franklin-Trout was in the midst of editing her four-part documentary series "The Great Space Race" that begins airing next Wednesday on PBS. "We made an insert in the program," Franklin-Trout says about dealing with the impact of the disaster, "but it didn't change anything. "What's happening with the U.S. space program is only part of the picture.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 1990 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Cards on the table. What was merely a suspicion now is supported by evidence: PBS has a pro-Jewish double standard when it comes to the intifada, the Palestinian rebellion against Israeli occupation of the West Bank and Gaza Strip. The evidence is "A Search for Solid Ground: The Intifada Through Israeli Eyes," at 10 tonight on Channels 28, 50 and 15.
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