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Jo Harvey Allen

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September 29, 1991 | KRISTINE McKENNA, Kristine McKenna writes about the arts for The Times
Surprising things just seem to happen to performer Jo Harvey Allen. Take this recent incident, for instance: "There I was at the gynecologist's having a routine exam," she says, speaking in her honeyed Texas drawl, "flat on my back with my legs in the air, when in walked three masked bandits with loaded guns come to rob the doctor's office! Me and the doctor froze and got dead quiet, and we heard them in the next room saying, 'Don't scream, we want all your money.'
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December 10, 2005 | Daryl H. Miller, Times Staff Writer
Late at night, a teenage boy shoots hoops in his West Texas backyard. The perils of his advanced era -- the 1950s -- are swirling through his mind, communists, atomic bombs and flying saucers colliding with such everyday fears as losing his parents. He makes a basket. The backboard erupts in a mushroom cloud. Yet the air is filled with music -- a gentle country lullaby.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 1989
Actress and writer Jo Harvey Allen will discuss her experiences making "True Stories" prior to a screening of the David Byrne film comedy at 7:30 tonight at the La Jolla Museum of Contemporary Art. Also featuring John Goodman, Spaulding Gray and Swoozie Kurtz, "True Stories" is an off-the-wall, satirical travelogue set in a small, modern-day Texas town. Harvey, who plays the role of "the Lying Woman" in the 1986 movie, will present her one-woman show "As It Is in Texas" at 8 p.m. Saturday at the museum.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 1991 | KRISTINE McKENNA, Kristine McKenna writes about the arts for The Times
Surprising things just seem to happen to performer Jo Harvey Allen. Take this recent incident, for instance: "There I was at the gynecologist's having a routine exam," she says, speaking in her honeyed Texas drawl, "flat on my back with my legs in the air, when in walked three masked bandits with loaded guns come to rob the doctor's office! Me and the doctor froze and got dead quiet, and we heard them in the next room saying, 'Don't scream, we want all your money.'
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2005 | Daryl H. Miller, Times Staff Writer
Late at night, a teenage boy shoots hoops in his West Texas backyard. The perils of his advanced era -- the 1950s -- are swirling through his mind, communists, atomic bombs and flying saucers colliding with such everyday fears as losing his parents. He makes a basket. The backboard erupts in a mushroom cloud. Yet the air is filled with music -- a gentle country lullaby.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 1991 | JOHN HENKEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Pioneer," a delirious sort of postmodern vaudeville from the Paul Dresher Ensemble, pulled into Royce Hall Friday evening for its local premiere. The surprise was how powerfully focused on psychological frontiers this exorcism of colonialism proved to be. Columbus, Cortes, President McKinley and Admiral Peary troop through and sing a song or deliver a gag. The staging is garish and giddy, the music loud and multi-referential and most of the acting ritually over-the-top.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 1996 | KRISTINE McKENNA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Unbeknownst to most Angelenos, a sculpture by artist-musician Terry Allen was commissioned by Sony Studios and installed on the exterior of the Fred Astaire building on Culver Boulevard in February.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 1988 | LEWIS SEGAL, Times Dance Writer
San Francisco-based modern-dance choreographer Margaret Jenkins currently specializes in high-profile multimedia projects that subordinate dance expression to text, score or design. Indeed, throughout her three-part program at UCLA's Royce Hall Friday, she functioned mostly as an illustrator, reiterating in movement the ideas defined by her collaborators.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 1986 | SHEILA BENSON, Times Film Critic
Virgil, Tex., flat, cement-hard, shimmeringly uglybeautiful, holds the same fascination for David Byrne, who made it up, as Nashville did for Robert Altman or Grover's Corners for Thornton Wilder or the Emerald City of Oz for L. Frank Baum. Or Hollywood for Nathanael West. Joyous, daft and hauntingly original, "True Stories" (Friday at the Plaza in Westwood), is Byrne's magical mystery tour of Texas: an introduction to the imaginary town of Virgil and its faintly surreal folks.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 1985 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON
The Los Angeles Theatre Center, the most ambitious new theater project in the city, has completed its opening roster of plays and directors. Sept. 19, the English language translation of Chekhov's "The Three Sisters" opens at Theatre One. Michael Frayne ("Noises Off") is translator. Stein Winge, the artistic director of the experimental wing of the National Theatre of Norway, directs. Sept. 26, Sam Shepard's "Fool For Love" has its Los Angeles premiere at Theatre Two.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 1989
Actress and writer Jo Harvey Allen will discuss her experiences making "True Stories" prior to a screening of the David Byrne film comedy at 7:30 tonight at the La Jolla Museum of Contemporary Art. Also featuring John Goodman, Spaulding Gray and Swoozie Kurtz, "True Stories" is an off-the-wall, satirical travelogue set in a small, modern-day Texas town. Harvey, who plays the role of "the Lying Woman" in the 1986 movie, will present her one-woman show "As It Is in Texas" at 8 p.m. Saturday at the museum.
NEWS
August 11, 1994
"Chippy," which premiered this year in Philadelphia, is a theatrical production based on the diaries of a prostitute who worked the Texas Panhandle in the 1930s. "Songs From Chippy" is one of the best albums of the year in country music, or any other genre. It brings together one of the most accomplished fraternities of singer-songwriters in the United States, the Austin, Texas, old-buddy network centered around Joe Ely and Butch Hancock.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 1986 | ROBERT McDONALD
They sing and talk and make music. They even look as if they're dancing. Mostly they look like trees. They're works of art to experience, not just to look at. They're components of a tripartite sculpture titled simply "Trees" by multi-talented artist Terry Allen. It is the newest addition to the Stuart Sculpture Collection on the UC San Diego campus. It will be formally dedicated today. The forms are real.
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