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ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2004 | Don Shirley
A culture clash seemed possible when the brash Latino comedy trio Culture Clash agreed to collaborate with Frank Loesser of "Guys and Dolls" fame. Actually, the group's partner was Loesser's legacy -- not the songwriter himself, who died in 1969. He left behind an unfinished musical called "Senor Discretion Himself," set in a small Mexican town and based on a short story by Budd Schulberg.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2004 | Don Shirley
A culture clash seemed possible when the brash Latino comedy trio Culture Clash agreed to collaborate with Frank Loesser of "Guys and Dolls" fame. Actually, the group's partner was Loesser's legacy -- not the songwriter himself, who died in 1969. He left behind an unfinished musical called "Senor Discretion Himself," set in a small Mexican town and based on a short story by Budd Schulberg.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 2003 | Blake Green, Newsday
Connoisseurs of that repository known as the Great American Songbook often point to Frank Loesser as one of its most versatile contributors. First lyricist, then both composer and lyricist, Loesser wrote more than 700 songs, working at various points in his life for Tin Pan Alley, Hollywood and Broadway. His songs are always around -- anytime you hear someone banging out "Heart and Soul" on the keyboard, you have Loesser to thank for the words he set to Hoagy Carmichael's music.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 1991 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Can two pianos be better than a full orchestra? That is the question. The answer: Yes. Apparently. It was composer Frank Loesser himself who encouraged the idea of a two-piano score for his "The Most Happy Fella," helping Robert Page to create the one that greets us at the Doolittle Theatre where a revival of this 1956 musical opened Wednesday. Too bad Loesser, who died in the '60s, couldn't see it.
NEWS
September 17, 1986 | MARYLOUISE OATES, Times Staff Writer
Here was a crowd born to the tux. And, as they partied Friday night, their very-black-tie presence put to rest fears that L.A. will experience a graying of the charity circuit. Barely a wrinkle could be seen among the members and supporters of the newly formed Century II group at its first fund-raiser for the 100-year-old Good Samaritan Hospital.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2002 | MIKE BOEHM
If you're going to do a show about gamblers leading the sportin' life in Manhattan in the middle of the 20th century, Maurice Hines says, getting it right means going for racial diversity. In 1950, the all-white original cast of "Guys and Dolls" sent audiences home humming "Luck Be a Lady," "Sue Me," "I've Never Been in Love Before" and other Frank Loesser gems.
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