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Joan Abrahamson

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MAGAZINE
November 3, 1985 | JOHN RILEY
Joan Abrahamson brings creative ideas to people with the power to use them best. Elegant combinations of ideas and people emerge into her consciousness the same way melodies and lyrics do when she writes popular songs, interrelated and almost fully formed. She's equally at home in the White House, where she worked 4 1/2 years for George Bush, and in her studio in Manhattan's Soho, where she paints large, non-representational canvases left-handed and draws smaller, realistic works ambidextrously.
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NEWS
March 8, 1989 | BETTY CUNIBERTI, Times Staff Writer
At a White House luncheon in the grand State Dining Room, a toddler in a highchair couldn't believe what she was seeing. It was not the portrait of Lincoln, the elegant china, the sparkling chandeliers, the bright linen or the enormous mound of fuchsia roses and tulips at the center of the table that impressed her. Nor had speeches by President Bush and the First Lady deterred her from her business of babbling and banging silverware.
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NEWS
March 8, 1989 | BETTY CUNIBERTI, Times Staff Writer
At a White House luncheon in the grand State Dining Room, a toddler in a highchair couldn't believe what she was seeing. It was not the portrait of Lincoln, the elegant china, the sparkling chandeliers, the bright linen or the enormous mound of fuchsia roses and tulips at the center of the table that impressed her. Nor had speeches by President Bush and the First Lady deterred her from her business of babbling and banging silverware.
MAGAZINE
November 3, 1985 | JOHN RILEY
Joan Abrahamson brings creative ideas to people with the power to use them best. Elegant combinations of ideas and people emerge into her consciousness the same way melodies and lyrics do when she writes popular songs, interrelated and almost fully formed. She's equally at home in the White House, where she worked 4 1/2 years for George Bush, and in her studio in Manhattan's Soho, where she paints large, non-representational canvases left-handed and draws smaller, realistic works ambidextrously.
NEWS
March 7, 1989 | SHIRLEY MARLOW
The First Lady hopes her new project will be one for the books. Once again turning her attention to a longtime favorite cause, she announced the formation of the Barbara Bush Foundation for Family Literacy. The volunteer program, headed by Joan Abrahamson of Los Angeles' Jefferson Institute, will raise money and distribute grants to existing literacy programs that involve not only children, but also their parents and grandparents.
NEWS
October 1, 1989 | MARY LOU LOPER, Times Staff Writer
It never rains, but it pours. Last December, the traditional Huntington Christmas party in San Marino was blown out in 100 m.p.h. winds. Marion Jorgensen and the trustees and overseers of the library, art collections and botanical gardens decided instead on a Huntington Autumn Gala: black-tie dining and dancing this Friday.
NEWS
June 18, 1985 | JACK JONES, Times Staff Writer
Two scholars associated with UC San Diego, anthropologist Edwin Hutchins and mathematician Shing-Tung Yau, were among the seven Californians named Monday to receive MacArthur fellowships. Fellows receive the $24,000-to-$60,000-a-year stipends for five years to allow them to pursue their interests as they see fit.
NEWS
September 9, 1989 | MIKE SPENCER, Times Staff Writer and
If H.G. Wells was right and civilization is a race between education and catastrophe, we'd all better jump out and buy some good running shoes. Statistically, catastrophe is a few laps ahead. Just look at the figures. Adult illiteracy running at a 20% rate, school dropouts running between 25% and 70%, depending on the location.
NEWS
December 24, 1989 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Santa Monica College is launching an ambitious design program that will bring students admitted by portfolio into contact with working architects, graphic designers and other artists in an atmosphere the college hopes will rival the world-renowned Bauhaus.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 1990 | DAVID COLKER
Educations in design don't come cheap. Basic tuition for a year at the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena is $15,000. At Otis Art Institute of Parsons School of Design in Los Angeles, it's $9,800. This fall, a new design school at Santa Monica College will buck the high price norm, but its creators say it certainly will not be a discount knockoff.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 1991 | SHAUNA SNOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With hammers pounding and tools ringing in the background, a group of 45 art students are clustered together on some old, mismatched couches. Shivering slightly from the draft wafting through the warehouse they call home, the students are brainstorming about an upcoming fund-raiser, one which they hope will keep their school afloat.
NEWS
June 18, 1985 | JACK JONES, Times Staff Writer
Noted furniture maker Sam Maloof, 69, was in what he called "a state of shock" Monday to be one of seven Californians named as winners of MacArthur Foundation fellowships providing tax-free, five-year stipends--with no strings attached. "I don't know how they even selected me," Maloof said in Alta Loma, where he lives in a seven-acre lemon grove near the foot of the San Gabriel Mountains and makes what many regard as the finest furniture crafted in California. "It's very thrilling.
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