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Joan Argleben

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 1989 | ALLISON SAMUELS, Times Staff Writer
Joan Argleben spends her mornings attending summer classes to complete her junior year of high school. She does as much studying as possible while in class, because when she goes home she must care for her 5-week-old baby girl. The high school student realized early that it would be difficult to both care for a child and complete her education. So when she learned of her pregnancy last September, she and her family, who live in Cypress, immediately began preparing for the baby's adoption.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1991 | CATHERINE GEWERTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a bittersweet defeat for an Aleut tribe, the California Supreme Court has refused to review a Santa Ana court ruling that gives the tribe the right to intervene in the adoption of a part-Aleut toddler but makes its victory nearly impossible. The move by the state's highest court leaves intact a June lower-court ruling that is viewed as a victory for the child's mother, Jodi Argleben, 20, of Cypress.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1990 | CATHERINE GEWERTZ
Trying to avoid a clash with a Canadian court, an Orange County Superior Court judge on Monday agreed that a part-Aleut baby should stay with her prospective adoptive parents in Canada until a legal dispute over her future can be decided. Judge Robert J. Polis had ruled earlier that 7-month-old Rebecca Argleben should stay with the couple in Vancouver, Canada, until Jan. 29.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 1991 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lawyers for an Aleut Indian tribe asked an appeals court Wednesday to allow the tribe a say in who should adopt a 21-month-old child born to an unwed Cypress mother. The mother, 20-year-old Jodi Argleben, wants her daughter, Rebecca, to be adopted by a Vancouver, Canada, couple. The Aleuts want the baby to be placed with an Indian family in Argleben's native Akhiok Village on Kodiak Island in Alaska.
NEWS
February 22, 1990 | CATHERINE GEWERTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a surprise victory for a part-Aleut mother, a Santa Ana judge reversed himself Wednesday and decided that the teen-ager's native Indian tribe has no right to dictate who will adopt her 8-month-old baby. The ruling by Orange County Superior Court Judge Robert J. Polis gave Jodi Argleben, 19, of Cypress, the right to choose who will rear her daughter, Rebecca. Argleben already has selected a couple in Vancouver, Canada, and smuggled the baby into their care in September.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1990 | DIANNE KLEIN
Jodi Argleben, 19 years old this month, was born to an Aleut Indian woman and a Russian man in the tribal village of Akhiok, on Alaska's Kodiak Island. This heritage is very important to many people--strangers to Jodi Argleben--in the United States and Canada and maybe even in other places too. These people say that Jodi's baby, 7-month-old Rebecca, who is one-quarter Aleut, belongs with the tribe. The Indians have bestowed tribal membership on her in absentia.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 1990 | CATHERINE GEWERTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A part-Aleutian Indian baby who is the object of an international tug of war will remain with a Canadian couple until the battle over her fate is resolved, a judge decided Wednesday. Under terms of an order by Superior Court Judge Robert J. Polis, 7-month-old Rebecca Argleben of Cypress will stay with a Vancouver couple pending another hearing in Santa Ana on Jan. 19. The baby has lived with the couple since Sept.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1989 | CATHERINE GEWERTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Attorneys on the East and West coasts and in Canada geared up Wednesday for an international legal struggle over an Orange County baby born to an Aleut teen-ager. The baby's mother, Jodi Argleben of Cypress, has gone into hiding and has apparently taken 5-month-old Rebecca to a family in Vancouver, Canada, for adoption, rather than give her up to the Aleut tribe, a branch of the Eskimos.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 1989 | CATHERINE GEWERTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alaska's Aleut Indian tribe has asked a judge to order the arrest of an Aleut woman from Cypress if she refuses to let a tribal family raise her baby. In court documents made public Monday the Akhiok Tribal Council asks Orange County Superior Court Judge Robert J. Polis to declare that Jodi Argleben 18, violated the law when she fled the country with 5-month-old Rebecca and gave the infant to a Canadian couple for adoption.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 1991 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Aleut Indian tribe heads for the 4th District Court of Appeal this week to argue that a 20-month-old girl with Indian blood should be placed with the Alaskan tribe. The baby's mother, Jodi Argleben, wants to give her daughter, Rebecca, to a Canadian couple for adoption. Argleben has vowed to appeal the case to the Supreme Court if necessary and said she will raise the child herself rather than see her sent to the Akhiok village on Kodiak Island.
NEWS
February 22, 1990 | CATHERINE GEWERTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a surprise victory for a part-Aleut mother, a Santa Ana judge reversed himself Wednesday and decided that the teen-ager's native Indian tribe has no right to dictate who will adopt her 8-month-old baby. The ruling by Orange County Superior Court Judge Robert J. Polis gave Jodi Argleben, 19, of Cypress, the right to choose who will rear her daughter, Rebecca. Argleben already has selected a couple in Vancouver, Canada, and smuggled the baby into their care in September.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1990 | CATHERINE GEWERTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a surprise victory for a part-Aleut teen-age mother, a judge reversed himself Wednesday and decided that the woman's Indian tribe has no right to dictate who will adopt her 8-month-old baby. The ruling by Orange County Superior Court Judge Robert J. Polis gave Jodi Argleben, 19, of Cypress the right to choose who will rear her daughter, Rebecca. Argleben already has selected a couple in Vancouver, Canada, and smuggled the baby into their care in September.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1990 | DIANNE KLEIN
Jodi Argleben, 19 years old this month, was born to an Aleut Indian woman and a Russian man in the tribal village of Akhiok, on Alaska's Kodiak Island. This heritage is very important to many people--strangers to Jodi Argleben--in the United States and Canada and maybe even in other places too. These people say that Jodi's baby, 7-month-old Rebecca, who is one-quarter Aleut, belongs with the tribe. The Indians have bestowed tribal membership on her in absentia.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1990 | CATHERINE GEWERTZ
Trying to avoid a clash with a Canadian court, an Orange County Superior Court judge on Monday agreed that a part-Aleut baby should stay with her prospective adoptive parents in Canada until a legal dispute over her future can be decided. Judge Robert J. Polis had ruled earlier that 7-month-old Rebecca Argleben should stay with the couple in Vancouver, Canada, until Jan. 29.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1991 | CATHERINE GEWERTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a bittersweet defeat for an Aleut tribe, the California Supreme Court has refused to review a Santa Ana court ruling that gives the tribe the right to intervene in the adoption of a part-Aleut toddler but makes its victory nearly impossible. The move by the state's highest court leaves intact a June lower-court ruling that is viewed as a victory for the child's mother, Jodi Argleben, 20, of Cypress.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 1989 | CATHERINE GEWERTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A native Aleut Indian teen-ager who lives in Cypress has gone into hiding, and reportedly has smuggled her 5-month-old daughter to a Canadian family for adoption rather than surrender the child to the Indian tribe. Bertram E. Hirsch, a New York attorney representing the tribe in its fight to place the baby with an Aleut family, said Jodi Argleben, 18, has given little Rebecca to a family in Vancouver, British Columbia, and has gone into hiding to avoid the ensuing tumult.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 1990 | CATHERINE GEWERTZ
A Canadian appeals court judge ruled Friday that the part-Aleut baby of a young Cypress woman will remain with prospective adoptive parents in British Columbia until legal arguments over her fate are resolved. The decision by Justice Patricia Proudfoot of the British Columbia Court of Appeal is similar to a ruling by Orange County Superior Court Judge Robert J. Polis, who is also hearing the case of 7-month-old Rebecca Argleben. But Polis' order applies only through Jan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 1990 | CATHERINE GEWERTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saying he is deeply disturbed that American Indians have the right to "reach into a woman's womb" in child-custody cases, a judge reluctantly ruled Friday that federal law entitles the Aleut tribe to claim a part-Aleut baby whose mother has put the child up for adoption. Orange County Superior Court Judge Robert J.
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