Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJoan B Johnson
IN THE NEWS

Joan B Johnson

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
October 4, 1989 | From Associated Press
George E. and Joan B. Johnson started one of the nation's largest black-owned companies together with $250 in 1954, but the family ties that bound the company and the couple have come undone. Johnson signed the company chairmanship and the bulk of its shares over to her this week in their divorce settlement. Johnson Products Co. makes hair care and cosmetic products under such brand names as Gentle-Treatment, Ultra Sheen and Classy Curl.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
October 4, 1989 | From Associated Press
George E. and Joan B. Johnson started one of the nation's largest black-owned companies together with $250 in 1954, but the family ties that bound the company and the couple have come undone. Johnson signed the company chairmanship and the bulk of its shares over to her this week in their divorce settlement. Johnson Products Co. makes hair care and cosmetic products under such brand names as Gentle-Treatment, Ultra Sheen and Classy Curl.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
June 26, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Johnson Withdraws Buyout Offer: The family that controls Johnson Products Co., the second-largest maker of black hair-care items, said it has dropped plans to take the company private in a $20.6-million buyout. The Chicago-based firm late last month offered $17.25 for each of Johnson Products 1.2 million outstanding shares. The shares represent 39% of Johnson's stock, with the remaining 61% owned by Chairwoman Joan B. Johnson, who founded the company with her former husband 37 years ago.
NEWS
August 4, 2000 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was easy for Republican leaders to put women and minorities onstage for the television audience during this week's national convention. Now comes the hard part: giving the party a more diverse face where it really counts, on Capitol Hill. The numbers are telling. Of 277 Republicans in the House and Senate, only 20 are women. Four are Latino, one African American and one Native American. None is Asian American. GOP strategists say they hope this year to make a few gains.
NEWS
September 5, 2000 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As fresh faces in two unexpectedly competitive House races, Joan B. Johnson of New York and Regina Montoya Coggins of Texas have raised hopes of scoring dual gains for diversity in a Congress still ruled mostly by white men. Johnson would be the first black Republican woman elected to Congress. Montoya Coggins, a Democrat, would be the first Latina sent to Congress from Texas.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|