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Joan Baez

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2002 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Folk singer Joan Baez delivered a surprise serenade to two activists who have spent months perched in redwoods owned by Pacific Lumber Co. near of Eureka. Baez was in the area for shows at Humboldt State University in Arcata. "What's up? Air a little thin up there?" Baez shouted to the protesters, who were more than 150 feet above the ground. She then began singing, "Ain't going to let nobody push me around / Gonna build a brand new world."
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2009 | ROBERT LLOYD, TELEVISION CRITIC
Her future boyfriend and sometime musical partner Bob Dylan was still in high school in Minnesota when Joan Baez first played Club 47 in Cambridge, Mass., in 1958 at age 17. We see her there, and then, in "Joan Baez: How Sweet the Sound," airing tonight on PBS as part of the series "American Masters" -- a teenager with long, dark hair; a Spanish guitar; and a mature mezzo-soprano voice. The next year, she appeared at the Newport Folk Festival and became famous. She made records that went gold.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 1996 | KAY HWANGBO
Folk music will be served up with the cappuccinos at the Encino Marketplace Starbucks this morning, when 1960s legend Joan Baez performs for the early-morning coffee crowd. Baez, scheduled to begin her set at 8:30 a.m., will sing songs from her latest album, "Ring Them Bells." At 7:30 a.m., fellow folk singer Dar Williams will kick off the informal show, which is open to the public. Williams will be the opening act for Baez at a performance at the Wiltern Theater tonight.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2009 | Associated Press
Joan Baez was just 18 when she performed at the first Newport Folk Festival, a self-described neurotic and high-maintenance teenager who remembers trembling in her sandals as she waited her turn on stage. She sang in her signature soprano that night, and her career quickly took off; she released an album on a major record label, landed on Time magazine's cover and made repeat appearances at the festival alongside on-off romantic partner Bob Dylan. "I didn't faint; I sang, and that was the beginning of a very long career," Baez says about her 1959 festival appearance.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 1991 | JIM WASHBURN
On the Amnesty International tours and other cause-related events, Joan Baez has often been trotted out like the hallowed ghost of protest past, the bona fide conscience of a whole generation, instead of a flesh and blood person. And the scale of those shows seemed to encourage her to fill the large settings with volume and histrionics that overwhelmed rather than revealed the lyric content of her songs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 2007 | Valerie J. Nelson, Times Staff Writer
Albert V. Baez, a physicist who did pioneering work with X-rays and who was the father of folk singers Joan Baez and the late Mimi Farina, has died. He was 94. Baez, who also worked to improve science education worldwide, died of natural causes Tuesday in an elder-care facility in Redwood City, Calif., his family announced. "In all aspects of his life, he combined personal and professional roles as scientist, environmentalist, teacher and humanitarian," the Baez family said in a statement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Dave Carter, 49, a respected songwriter in the folk music scene, died of an apparent heart attack July 19 in Hadley, Mass. Carter had just returned from a run when he was stricken and died a short time later. He was scheduled to perform Saturday with his longtime musical partner Tracy Grammer at the Green River Festival in Greenfield, Mass. Born in Oxnard, Carter was raised in Texas and Oklahoma. His mother was a fundamentalist evangelist and his father a mathematician.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 1986 | STEVE HOCHMAN
Joan Baez demonstrated Wednesday at the Universal Amphitheatre just what it is that has carried her from the Greenwich Village coffee houses of 25 years ago through Woodstock to the recent Amnesty International concerts: perspective. The key to this was found not in her message songs--like many of her ilk, she tends toward smug political correctness--but in the often self-deprecating sense of humor revealed through some funny, surprising selections and a string of witty asides.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 1992 | CHRIS WILLMAN
Conspicuously absent from the Bob Dylan tribute in New York last weekend were some significant figures in his career--notably, Joan Baez. At the Troubadour on Tuesday, Baez offered the locals her own belated Bobby homage by opening with "Don't Think Twice, It's All Right" and singing the last verse with her approximation of the patented Dylan vocal sneer.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 1988 | PHILIP WARBURG, Warburg is a free-lance journalist based in Jerusalem. and
An Israeli newspaper recently published a cartoon showing Ronald Reagan, with garland and guitar, flashing a 'V' sign and running toward Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir. The caption quoted a shocked Shamir as saying, "Oh please! I still haven't recovered from Joan Baez!" The prime minister had no contact with the American folk singer and political activist during her recent weeklong visit to Israel and the Occupied Territories.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2009 | Randy Lewis
If all the stars had aligned for her, Joan Baez would have come away from this year's Grammy Awards with the first recording academy trophy of her long and distinguished career. She was nominated for her critically lauded album "Day After Tomorrow," a sparsely produced collection of pointed and illuminating songs by contemporary writers including Steve Earle (who produced it), Patty Griffin, Tom Waits, Elvis Costello and Eliza Gilkyson.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 2007 | Valerie J. Nelson, Times Staff Writer
Albert V. Baez, a physicist who did pioneering work with X-rays and who was the father of folk singers Joan Baez and the late Mimi Farina, has died. He was 94. Baez, who also worked to improve science education worldwide, died of natural causes Tuesday in an elder-care facility in Redwood City, Calif., his family announced. "In all aspects of his life, he combined personal and professional roles as scientist, environmentalist, teacher and humanitarian," the Baez family said in a statement.
NEWS
February 2, 2006
The "Hot Ticket" regarding Wayne Shorter's upcoming concert could certainly have been written entirely on this marvelous artist, but the writer decided to go off-subject and tossed in a dig at John Coltrane ["An Explorer of Sound," Jan. 26]. Besides being mean-spirited, that statement's flat-out ignorance should disqualify this writer from any sort of coverage on the subject of jazz. In a similar vein, August Brown takes a cheap shot at Joan Baez in his article that should have stuck to its subject, Chava Alberstein ["A Still-Fresh Vocal Observer, Jan. 26]
NATIONAL
August 22, 2005 | From Times Wire Services
Folk singer Joan Baez joined war protesters near President Bush's ranch Sunday to meet with military families who want troops pulled out of Iraq. "You know, in the first march I went on against the war in Vietnam, there were 10 of us," Baez said as she met with a group of women whose sons were heading to Iraq or had died there. "This is huge." About 500 people gathered to hear Baez play a free concert on a 1-acre lot offered by a landowner who opposes the war.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2002 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Folk singer Joan Baez delivered a surprise serenade to two activists who have spent months perched in redwoods owned by Pacific Lumber Co. near of Eureka. Baez was in the area for shows at Humboldt State University in Arcata. "What's up? Air a little thin up there?" Baez shouted to the protesters, who were more than 150 feet above the ground. She then began singing, "Ain't going to let nobody push me around / Gonna build a brand new world."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Dave Carter, 49, a respected songwriter in the folk music scene, died of an apparent heart attack July 19 in Hadley, Mass. Carter had just returned from a run when he was stricken and died a short time later. He was scheduled to perform Saturday with his longtime musical partner Tracy Grammer at the Green River Festival in Greenfield, Mass. Born in Oxnard, Carter was raised in Texas and Oklahoma. His mother was a fundamentalist evangelist and his father a mathematician.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 1993 | Buddy Seigal, San Diego free-lance writer
In a long and controversial career, singer Joan Baez has been noted as much for her social activism as for her music. So it came as no real surprise when she announced last week her intention to play a series of concerts in war-torn Sarajevo. Baez, 52, has marched with Martin Luther King, battled the Internal Revenue Service, led anti-war demonstrations internationally, been jailed for civil disobedience and founded the Resource Center for Nonviolence.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2009 | ROBERT LLOYD, TELEVISION CRITIC
Her future boyfriend and sometime musical partner Bob Dylan was still in high school in Minnesota when Joan Baez first played Club 47 in Cambridge, Mass., in 1958 at age 17. We see her there, and then, in "Joan Baez: How Sweet the Sound," airing tonight on PBS as part of the series "American Masters" -- a teenager with long, dark hair; a Spanish guitar; and a mature mezzo-soprano voice. The next year, she appeared at the Newport Folk Festival and became famous. She made records that went gold.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2002 | ROGER CATLIN, HARTFORD COURANT
Joan Baez is striking a familiar pose--helping introduce her audiences to new voices, just as she did 40 years ago, when the queen of the folk world boosted the career of a young Bob Dylan. "It's an adventure," says Baez, 61, who, after similar tours with Dar Williams and Eliza Carthy, is joined on a current tour of East Coast venues by newcomers Dave Carter and Tracy Grammar. Richard Shindell, who has toured with Baez before, rounds out the ensemble.
BOOKS
May 20, 2001 | GREIL MARCUS, Greil Marcus is the author of numerous books, including "Invisible Republic: Bob Dylan's Basement Tapes" and, most recently, "Double Trouble: Bill Clinton and Elvis Presley in a Land of No Alternatives."
Richard Farina died in a motorcycle accident near Carmel on April 30, 1966, just following a party celebrating the publication of his first novel, "Been Down So Long It Looks Like Up to Me." A musician, songwriter, singer, and fabulist as well as a novelist, he seduced many people in life, and many in death. David Hajdu, author of the well-received biography of Billy Strayhorn, the Duke Ellington collaborator, is one of the latter.
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