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Joan Chen

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June 23, 1999 | SCARLET CHENG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"It doesn't require anything to be a director!" actress-turned-director Joan Chen says with a laugh, her eyes curled into half-moons of merriment. She has not only directed her first feature, "Xiu Xiu: The Sent Down Girl," but has quickly leveraged it into her next. "It requires a lot of skillful b.s." Then she grows serious. "It does require something if you want to be a good director.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2013 | By Heller McAlpin
By the time Anchee Min made it to America in 1984, she was "considered a 'cooked seed' - no chance to sprout. " As she explains in her new memoir, "I was 27 years old and life had ended for me in China. I was Madame Mao's trash, which meant I wasn't worth spit. " Min's unforgettable first book, "Red Azalea" (published in 1994), chronicled the hardships of her childhood during China's Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution. In the simple, straightforward declarative sentences of someone new to the language, she wrote about how her teacher parents - considered "bourgeois sympathizers" requiring reeducation - were sent to work in factories, and how she, at 17, was sent to a farm labor camp.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 1990 | SUSAN KING
Joan Chen discovered a whole new side to her personality when she cut off her long hair for her latest movie, the futuristic action-thriller "The Blood of Heroes." "I always had long hair," says the 28-year-old native of Shanghai. "I surprised myself when I cut it. I became more sophisticated. Because you don't have to fuss about your hair anymore, it makes you a simpler person in the morning--you just wash your hair. There's nothing else you can do."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 1999 | SCARLET CHENG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"It doesn't require anything to be a director!" actress-turned-director Joan Chen says with a laugh, her eyes curled into half-moons of merriment. She has not only directed her first feature, "Xiu Xiu: The Sent Down Girl," but has quickly leveraged it into her next. "It requires a lot of skillful b.s." Then she grows serious. "It does require something if you want to be a good director.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2013 | By Heller McAlpin
By the time Anchee Min made it to America in 1984, she was "considered a 'cooked seed' - no chance to sprout. " As she explains in her new memoir, "I was 27 years old and life had ended for me in China. I was Madame Mao's trash, which meant I wasn't worth spit. " Min's unforgettable first book, "Red Azalea" (published in 1994), chronicled the hardships of her childhood during China's Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution. In the simple, straightforward declarative sentences of someone new to the language, she wrote about how her teacher parents - considered "bourgeois sympathizers" requiring reeducation - were sent to work in factories, and how she, at 17, was sent to a farm labor camp.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 1989 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, Times Staff Writer
Why wasn't her father answering his phone at 3 o'clock in the morning in Shanghai? And what about her 82-year-old maternal grandmother, who lives with him? Wouldn't she answer, even if her father, a doctor, was at the hospital? And how was her grandmother coping in a city where markets are closed and the buses are not running? A world away from China, on a hillside in Laurel Canyon, actress Joan Chen, suddenly looking very pale, was frightened. "I'm very worried about my family there," she said.
NEWS
September 25, 1994
The Multicultural Motion Picture Awards organization held its second annual Diversity Awards program Tuesday at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Beverly Hills. Award recipients were cited for bringing a distinctive cultural perspective to the screen. Singer and actress Diahann Carroll received the MMPA's Lifetime Achievement Award. Other awards went to Rosie Perez, Louis Gossett Jr., Joan Chen, Marlee Matlin, Andy Garcia, Sonia Braga, Wes Studi, Oliver Stone and Bill Duke.
NEWS
August 5, 1990
Director David Lynch may not have revolutionized prime-time TV serials with this series opener, but he made a dark and stylish splash. His hip soap opera suggests all kinds of nasty, dangerous things squiggling under a cold, gleaming surface. In form, it's a murder mystery: a golden girl murdered in an average Northwestern city, its evil secrets scraped up by an FBI agent. In mood, it's unique--as if an atonal modernist had taken a TV ad jingle and turned it into a cold, creepy sonata.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 1986
LEFT ARTICLE: Tomales Bay, Marin County, Calif., "Wildfire," a 1940s-like romantic drama with Linda Fiorentino and Steven Bauer, directed by Zalman King. RIGHT: Peking, the Forbidden City, "The Last Emperor," a historical drama with Peter O'Toole, Joan Chen and John Lone, directed by Bernardo Bertolucci. CENTER RIGHT: London, "Hearts of Fire," a drama with music about rock 'n' roll stardom, with Bob Dylan, Rupert Everett and singer Fiona, directed by Richard Marquand.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Tony Leung Chiu-wai won the best actor award Monday at the second Asian Film Awards in Hong Kong for his performance in the Ang Lee spy thriller "Lust, Caution." The big winner, however, was "Secret Sunshine," the South Korean story of a widow's mental breakdown, which captured awards as best movie, best director for Lee Chang-dong and best actress for Jeon Do-yeon. The role earlier earned Jeon acting honors at the Cannes Film Festival. Best supporting actress went to veteran Joan Chen for "The Sun Also Rises," and China's Sun Hong-lei won best supporting actor for "Mongol."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 1990 | SUSAN KING
Joan Chen discovered a whole new side to her personality when she cut off her long hair for her latest movie, the futuristic action-thriller "The Blood of Heroes." "I always had long hair," says the 28-year-old native of Shanghai. "I surprised myself when I cut it. I became more sophisticated. Because you don't have to fuss about your hair anymore, it makes you a simpler person in the morning--you just wash your hair. There's nothing else you can do."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 1989 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, Times Staff Writer
Why wasn't her father answering his phone at 3 o'clock in the morning in Shanghai? And what about her 82-year-old maternal grandmother, who lives with him? Wouldn't she answer, even if her father, a doctor, was at the hospital? And how was her grandmother coping in a city where markets are closed and the buses are not running? A world away from China, on a hillside in Laurel Canyon, actress Joan Chen, suddenly looking very pale, was frightened. "I'm very worried about my family there," she said.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 1991 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Doughnut and Coffee Break: What was Joselyn (Joan Chen) doing inside the knob of a bed-stand drawer? And why was the dwarf dancing on her death bed? "Twin Peaks" fans will have to wait a while to find out. ABC put the series on hiatus following Saturday's broadcast, along with the show that precedes it, "Under Cover." Both have been getting clobbered in the ratings; they tied for 85th the previous week among 94 prime-time programs.
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