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Joan Crawford

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Everyone knows (or should) Carole Lombard in "To Be or Not to Be," but what did she do before? Similarly, what did "Mildred Pierce's" Joan Crawford do in the years after? Two new DVD sets from the TCM Vault Collection answer those questions. "Carole Lombard in the Thirties" presents three of the comedies in which the actress had smaller roles: "Brief Moment," "Lady by Choice" and "No More Orchids. " Similarly, "Joan Crawford in the Fifties" presents four of the juicy melodramas she starred in: "Queen Bee," "Harriet Craig," "The Story of Esther Costello" and "Autumn Leaves.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 2014 | By Rebecca Trounson
Bob Thomas, a Los Angeles-based reporter and columnist who covered entertainment for the Associated Press for more than six decades, writing compelling, human and often humorous stories about Hollywood's glittering and glamorous, has died. He was 92. Thomas, who also wrote biographies of many of the stars and studio chiefs of Hollywood's Golden Age, including Joan Crawford, Fred Astaire, William Holden and Walt Disney, died Friday of age-related causes at his home in Encino, his daughter Nancy said.
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NEWS
November 20, 1988 | BURT A. FOLKART, Times Staff Writer
Dore Freeman, who accumulated what is believed to be the greatest collection of memorabilia of any single film star--20,000 still photos of Joan Crawford, 3,000 personal snapshots, remnants of her wardrobe and even her Social Security card--died Tuesday of the complications of a stroke. The veteran Metro Goldwyn Mayer publicist and photographer was 76 and was at work as a consultant for the Turner Entertainment Co., which purchased the MGM film library.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2013 | By Susan King
Singer-actress Ann Blyth loves her fans. So much so that Blyth's been personally answering her fan mail for nearly 70 years. "I get mail from all around the world," noted Blyth, who turns 85 on Friday. "I am so thankful to read their sweet notes and letters. " Though the fans write to her about her glorious soprano in movie musicals such as 1955's "Kismet," her deft comedic timing in farces like 1949's "Mr. Peabody and the Mermaid" and her credible dramatic turns in films such as 1952's "One Minute to Zero," there is one movie that dominates the letters - the 1945 film noir classic "Mildred Pierce.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1992 | KEVIN THOMAS
"Pretty Ladies" (1925), which screens today at the Silent Movie, would be totally forgotten had it not marked the screen debut of Joan Crawford. Directed by Monta Bell from a story by Adela Rogers St. John, it's a minor backstage drama centering on the lonely star comedian of a Ziegfeld Follies-type revue (an ever-wistful ZaSu Pitts), who falls for an aspiring songwriter (Tom Moore) only to have him vamped by a glamorous soubrette (Lilyan Tashman).
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 1992 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
You might call Neil Tucker's "Joan and the Zulus" at the Cast Theatre an attempt at mythic comedy. It marries no less than two goddesses: Joan Crawford of the silver screen and Ulanga of the Zulu tribes (or so we are told). In addition, "Joan and the Zulus" takes place in real and in mythic time. It also has real if bizarre people in it, and supernatural presences. And it capitalizes on such major American pop icons as Pepsi-Cola, a company of which Crawford was a vice president.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2013 | By Susan King
Singer-actress Ann Blyth loves her fans. So much so that Blyth's been personally answering her fan mail for nearly 70 years. "I get mail from all around the world," noted Blyth, who turns 85 on Friday. "I am so thankful to read their sweet notes and letters. " Though the fans write to her about her glorious soprano in movie musicals such as 1955's "Kismet," her deft comedic timing in farces like 1949's "Mr. Peabody and the Mermaid" and her credible dramatic turns in films such as 1952's "One Minute to Zero," there is one movie that dominates the letters - the 1945 film noir classic "Mildred Pierce.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 1992 | ROBERT KOEHLER, Robert Koehler writes regularly about theater for Westside/Valley Calendar.
"Africa was, in a sense, my baptism in Pepsi, and I have a great affection for that continent." --Joan Crawford As a playwright with a taste for the oddly comic, Neil Tucker likes to think that if a situation isn't immediately funny, he can make it that way. Even when the situation is catastrophic--such as the '70s oil embargo or the 1987 Whittier earthquake--Tucker has twisted the material into comedy in such plays as "Oil!" and "Aftershock: The Movie."
NEWS
July 28, 2002 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During a career that spanned 45 years, Joan Crawford played the role of the glamorous movie star to perfection. Her adopted daughter Christina Crawford, who penned the memoir "Mommie Dearest," says her mother focused all of her attentions on being a movie star. "She wasn't educated, but she was smart," says Crawford. "Whatever you put your focus on is what you do well."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2008 | Kevin Thomas, Special to The Times
Joan CRAWFORD was the definitive Hollywood star, with her large expressive eyes, bold sculpted features, perfect posture and seemingly eternal glamour. Born Lucille LeSueur in San Antonio, Texas, on March 23, 1908 -- possibly earlier -- she embodied rags-to-riches stardom more vividly than anyone else and sustained her career for more than 45 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Everyone knows (or should) Carole Lombard in "To Be or Not to Be," but what did she do before? Similarly, what did "Mildred Pierce's" Joan Crawford do in the years after? Two new DVD sets from the TCM Vault Collection answer those questions. "Carole Lombard in the Thirties" presents three of the comedies in which the actress had smaller roles: "Brief Moment," "Lady by Choice" and "No More Orchids. " Similarly, "Joan Crawford in the Fifties" presents four of the juicy melodramas she starred in: "Queen Bee," "Harriet Craig," "The Story of Esther Costello" and "Autumn Leaves.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 2012 | By Jim Brooks, Los Angeles Times
"What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?" Looks like we're about to find out again. And actresses of a certain age everywhere must be quivering in their orthopedics at news of a remake. After all, the 1962 original, a delicious hot mess of black comedy/chiller thriller, earned late-career cred for two of golden Hollywood's declining and long feuding queen bees. Bette Davis camped it up as "Baby Jane" Hudson, a former child star-turned-abusive, frowzy caretaker. Joan Crawford was invalid sister Blanche, a onetime star in her own right, crippled years earlier in a mysterious car wreck.
HOME & GARDEN
November 7, 2009 | LAUREN BEALE
Los Angeles Lakers forward Lamar Odom has listed his Manhattan Beach home for $2,399,000. Custom-built in 2002, the Mediterranean has an open floor plan, formal living and dining rooms, a family room with a hand-carved wet bar, three stone fireplaces, an office and a three-car garage. A round window brings light into the top of the two-story foyer. The house has five bedrooms -- some of which Odom used as closet space -- and five bathrooms in 4,181 square feet. In the resort-like backyard, a stepped terrace off the back of the house leads to a built-in barbecue area, a gas fire pit and a swimming pool and spa. There are views of downtown L.A., the Hollywood sign and the mountains.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 2009 | SUSAN KING
Diane Baker's professional acting career began by her performing a scene from the 1955 James Dean movie "East of Eden." "I did the scene for three studios," says the vivacious 71-year-old. "That's all I ever did. I never went on an audition. I got offered contracts with CBS, Paramount and Fox. My agent came to me and said, 'You got offers from all three. Let's pick the best one.' It turned out to be Fox." Baker, who is celebrating her 50th year as an actress, has appeared in such classic films as "The Diary of Anne Frank," "Marnie" and the Oscar-winning best film "The Silence of the Lambs."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2008 | Kevin Thomas, Special to The Times
Joan CRAWFORD was the definitive Hollywood star, with her large expressive eyes, bold sculpted features, perfect posture and seemingly eternal glamour. Born Lucille LeSueur in San Antonio, Texas, on March 23, 1908 -- possibly earlier -- she embodied rags-to-riches stardom more vividly than anyone else and sustained her career for more than 45 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2008 | Susan King
She may have not liked wire hangers and certainly never received the mother-of-the-year award, but there's no denying that Joan Crawford (pictured) was a top star in Hollywood's golden age. The actress, who would've turned 100 this year, is being feted Monday night at UCLA's James Bridges Theater with speeches and film clips. (www .uclalumni.net) . . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 2012 | By Jim Brooks, Los Angeles Times
"What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?" Looks like we're about to find out again. And actresses of a certain age everywhere must be quivering in their orthopedics at news of a remake. After all, the 1962 original, a delicious hot mess of black comedy/chiller thriller, earned late-career cred for two of golden Hollywood's declining and long feuding queen bees. Bette Davis camped it up as "Baby Jane" Hudson, a former child star-turned-abusive, frowzy caretaker. Joan Crawford was invalid sister Blanche, a onetime star in her own right, crippled years earlier in a mysterious car wreck.
NEWS
February 16, 1995 | MARIA D. LASO
Although divorce and adultery may seem odd subjects for a post-Valentine's Day rental, stick with "The Women" for a range of views on love, most of them quite sensible, and a surprisingly happy ending, with a few tears and plenty of laughs along the way. The 1939 film has fun using the relationships between women (there are no men in the cast) to explore the relationships between men and women.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2007 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
Agiant monster from the deep, making mincemeat of London! Zsa Zsa Gabor in outer space! Joan Crawford bonding with prehistoric man! James Brolin hijacking an airplane! Women in prison! Joan Collins sashaying in the pyramids! Priceless film moments all. Now Warner Home Video is celebrating the trashy, kitschy and the classically corny with its four-volume "Cult Camp Classics," arriving Tuesday on DVD.
NEWS
January 31, 2007 | Carina Chocano, Times Staff Writer
WHEN protagonists grow up, they become antagonists. This is the Hollywood cycle of life. Early generations saw Gloria Swanson and Buster Keaton transformed into bridge-playing ghouls, Bette Davis transformed into Baby Jane, Joan Crawford transformed into Joan Crawford. Once a beloved star hits unlovable middle age, the thinking goes, audiences love to hate them.
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