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Joan Crawford

ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2005 | Daryl H. Miller, Times Staff Writer
Bedecked in sculpted wig and butterfly-painted lips, John Epperson becomes an entrancing creation known as Lypsinka. Sharp as a tack and glamorous as can be, she is simply irresistible. Yet -- owing to the fact that much of her conversation is edited together from melodramatic films -- she is also emotionally flammable. Wanting to have it all yet finding the deck stacked against her, she is a woman perpetually on the verge of a nervous breakdown.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 2004 | Emanuel Levy, Special to The Times
Younger or older, women are proving to be a force in American films these days in unprecedented ways, showing they can lead and carry a film on their own terms. Indeed, for the first time in 60 years, women are on top -- or at least above the title -- with Hollywood planning and structuring high-profile movies for them. For example, Rob Marshall's exhilarating 2002 film version of "Chicago" won notice not only for being the first musical to have won the best picture Oscar since 1968's "Oliver!"
NEWS
July 28, 2002 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During a career that spanned 45 years, Joan Crawford played the role of the glamorous movie star to perfection. Her adopted daughter Christina Crawford, who penned the memoir "Mommie Dearest," says her mother focused all of her attentions on being a movie star. "She wasn't educated, but she was smart," says Crawford. "Whatever you put your focus on is what you do well."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 2001
Perhaps I'm one of those zealots referred to in the June 25 article "Siding With Gentrification in Old Towne." The city of Orange made a mistake initially in the handling of Lemar Lundquist's application for re-siding his 1902 home. Officials have gone out of their way to correct this error and are, in fact, expending funds that they probably aren't required to in order to correct this error. Old Towne Orange is the largest historic district in the state. The city has building codes to help preserve and maintain the historic district.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 1997
Thank you so much for your editorial comments Aug. 3, "Old Towne Gets New Hope." Old Towne Orange is a very special place, and this has not been by chance. There are many groups and individuals dedicated not only to the preservation but also the success of Old Towne. Leason Pomeroy heads a group of architects and illustrators called the Design Collaborative that developed a Downtown Vision Plan. Their efforts began over five years ago and they are now just on the brink of materializing.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 1997
The Silent Film Guild presents "Spring Fever," a 1927 romantic comedy starring William Haines and Joan Crawford and directed by Edward Sedgwick. It will be shown tonight only at 7:30 at the Music Hall, 9036 Wilshire Blvd., Beverly Hills. It will be preceded by a short, "Day Dreams," with Elsa Lanchester and Charles Laughton, and a Fleischer Brothers cartoon, "Koko's Earth Control." There will be live organ accompaniment. Information: (213) 389-2148.
NEWS
May 28, 1995 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During the Golden Age of Hollywood, Claire Trevor Bren earned her place in movie history by playing women with tarnished reputations. She was the worn streetwalker in "Dead End" with Humphrey Bogart, the frontier prostitute in "Stagecoach" with John Wayne and gangster Edward G. Robinson's alcoholic moll in "Key Largo," for which she won the 1948 Oscar for best supporting actress. But for Bren, stepmother of billionaire Irvine Co. Chairman Donald L. Bren, the role of actress was secondary.
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