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April 22, 1989 | NANCY CHURNIN
In 1954, John Wayne made the movie that may have killed him. Like 91 of the 220 people who worked on "The Conqueror," Wayne developed cancer. Later, 46 of them died from it. The movie set was in St. George, Utah, near an atomic testing range where 11 bombs were detonated the year before. Coincidence? Not according to the San Francisco Mime Troupe, which points a finger at these developments in "Secrets in the Sand." The show played in San Diego Wednesday and then moved to Culver City, where its second and final performance is tonight.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2002 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Any street-corner agitator can spout the old saw about the personal being political. Joan Holden's mission of the moment is to fuse them vividly on stage. Since January, the veteran playwright has struggled to transform Barbara Ehrenreich's "Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting By in America," a political broadside that has been a nonfiction bestseller, into a dramatic personal tale. It opens Thursday at the Mark Taper Forum.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2002 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Any street-corner agitator can spout the old saw about the personal being political. Joan Holden's mission of the moment is to fuse them vividly on stage. Since January, the veteran playwright has struggled to transform Barbara Ehrenreich's "Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting By in America," a political broadside that has been a nonfiction bestseller, into a dramatic personal tale. It opens Thursday at the Mark Taper Forum.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 1989 | NANCY CHURNIN
In 1954, John Wayne made the movie that may have killed him. Like 91 of the 220 people who worked on "The Conqueror," Wayne developed cancer. Later, 46 of them died from it. The movie set was in St. George, Utah, near an atomic testing range where 11 bombs were detonated the year before. Coincidence? Not according to the San Francisco Mime Troupe, which points a finger at these developments in "Secrets in the Sand." The show played in San Diego Wednesday and then moved to Culver City, where its second and final performance is tonight.
NEWS
October 24, 2002 | Sean Mitchell
Theater Nickel and Dimed -- The Mark Taper Forum has done a daring thing: putting on a play that attacks the economic privilege of 90% of the people who will see it. Joan Holden's adaptation of social critic Barbara Ehrenreich's book "Nickel and Dimed," about the working poor, is a heady evening, steering us at Wal-Mart-aisle level through the physical hardship, corporate peonage and other indignities of life at minimum wage.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 1999
Ellen Greene and Estelle Parsons head the cast of "The First Picture Show," the story of one of the last silent-movie directors at age 99, and a niece determined to tell her story. The new musical theater piece features book and lyrics by David Gordon and Ain Gordon, with music by Jeanine Tesori. * "The First Picture Show," Mark Taper Forum, 135 N. Grand Ave. Tuesdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m.; Sundays, 7:30 p.m.; Saturdays and Sundays, 2:30 p.m. Ends Sept. 19. $29 to $40. (213) 628-2772.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2013 | By Philip Brandes
The real-life people depicted in “Nickel and Dimed” at the Hudson Mainstage Theatre aren't this docudrama's target audience - those people couldn't afford even the modest $25 ticket. Rather, Joan Holden's stage adaptation of journalist Barbara Ehrenreich's 2001 bestseller about America's working poor is aimed squarely at educating the more fortunate among us in the realities of trying to get by on the income from low-wage service jobs. In the social experiment depicted in both the book and play, Ehrenreich posed as an unskilled worker in three cities to see if such jobs (paying in the $6 - $7 range at the time)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 1987 | RAY LOYND
The San Francisco Mime Troupe, a Tony-laureled theater collective that long ago gave up mime in favor of highly vocal political comedy, is showing some of the wear of its 28-year history. The 13-member touring troupe blew into Caltech's Beckman Auditorium last weekend for a single performance of its South African-inspired spy/thriller, "The Mozamgola Caper." The production is exuberant, richly musical and flavorfully visual.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 1999 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Artists and musicians inhabit loft space. Neighborhood becomes trendy. Developers drum artists out via rent hikes, so trendoids with dough can move into fabulous renovated live/work lofts no longer dominated by pesky artists. All this, and a $3.90 latte right down the block! Such is the gentrification situation tackled by "City for Sale," the latest from the nation's best-known activist theater collective, the San Francisco Mime Troupe.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 1998 | DARYL H. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bologna General was a county hospital with one of the few remaining emergency rooms in the area, open to all who needed care. But the hospital has just been privatized, and the new for-profit owners have closed the ER, replacing it with a triage hotline: 1-(800) NOT-SICK. The staff has been so downsized that a single nurse cares for an entire ward, manning a computerized Robo-Nurse console that delivers medicines to rows upon rows of patients through a tangle of tubes.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 1986 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
The San Francisco Mime Troupe believes that you can make people think by making them laugh. The Los Angeles Theatre Center believes in speaking out for the excluded. It was time they did a show together. But they could have found something less pious than "Spain '36." Written by the Mime Troupe's Joan Holden, it is a pageant with songs about the brave workers who fought for Spain in '36 against the unholy alliance of church, army and money that was the Fascist cause.
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