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Joan Hotchkis

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 1996 | CATHY CURTIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"There had been deep stuff in me that had been brewing all my life, stuff I wasn't even aware of because it'd been covered up by a little-girl view of my parents," says Joan Hotchkis, whose one-woman show, "Elements of Flesh, or Screwing Saved My Ass" opens at the Huntington Beach Art Center on Saturday.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 1996 | CATHY CURTIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"There had been deep stuff in me that had been brewing all my life, stuff I wasn't even aware of because it'd been covered up by a little-girl view of my parents," says Joan Hotchkis, whose one-woman show, "Elements of Flesh, or Screwing Saved My Ass" opens at the Huntington Beach Art Center on Saturday.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 1996 | DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Highways, the Santa Monica performing arts center that is haven for avant-garde, gay and minority artists, has a long-standing tradition of really getting on the nerves of the conservative right. Witness last summer's flap over the brochure for the venue's Ecce Lesbo/Ecce Homo Summer Festival, which featured photos of partially unclothed performance artists as well as humorous, sexually explicit descriptions.
NEWS
August 11, 1996 | MARY LOU LOPER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Hotchkis goes through life at a breakneck pace. He's Mr. Energy--car racing, skiing, riding, traveling nonstop. His contemporaries look on in awe and envy. And his 65th birthday was surely the birthday of the year (the decade?), moving every sedentary type off his duff. Ladies were poetically advised to wear pastel or white. Black ties were excluded. Instead: blue blazers and white suits for men.
NEWS
August 11, 1996 | MARY LOU LOPER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Hotchkis goes through life at a breakneck pace. He's Mr. Energy--car racing, skiing, riding, traveling nonstop. His contemporaries look on in awe and envy. And his 65th birthday was surely the birthday of the year (the decade?), moving every sedentary type off his duff. Ladies were poetically advised to wear pastel or white. Black ties were excluded. Instead: blue blazers and white suits for men.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 1996 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY
"Remembering the men, I give up on names and turn to body parts." The first line of Joan Hotchkis' solo show "Elements of Flesh" at Highways emphasizes the aptness of the piece's subtitle--"Screwing Saved My Ass." According to Hotchkis, a lissome 68-year-old who looks half her age, older people are actively discouraged from remaining sexually vital by disapproving family members--and society in general.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 1990 | JANICE ARKATOV
"I was brought up to be a different kind of woman than I turned out to be," explained actress Joan Hotchkis, whose solo performance work "Tearsheets: Letters I Didn't Send Home," opens this weekend at Highways in Santa Monica. "To do this piece, I had to break down some very strong taboos: that women should stay in their place, be inconspicuous, silent. So for me, it's like coming out--on the page and on the stage."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 1991 | JOHN GODFREY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
At the beginning of her one-woman show, Joan Hotchkis sings a few lilting bars from the Western ditty "Home on the Range." "Oh, give me a home where the buffalo roam/Where the deer and the antelope play/Where seldom is heard a discouraging word--" She stops abruptly. "That's a lie," Hotchkis says, staring hard at the audience, all music gone from her voice. "I heard a lot of discouraging words."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 1992 | ROBERT EPSTEIN
Joan Hotchkis is like a baserunner turning for home but then making the terrible discovery that she has missed a base. Gone wide at one corner. So she stops, turns and heads back, retracing the wild journey, getting through the confusion and the chase the right way this time. We'll leave the final call to some mythical umpire since the sixtysomething actress-writer and now producer is still out there running, shaking off the tag, going over old territories in new ways.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 1996 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY
"Remembering the men, I give up on names and turn to body parts." The first line of Joan Hotchkis' solo show "Elements of Flesh" at Highways emphasizes the aptness of the piece's subtitle--"Screwing Saved My Ass." According to Hotchkis, a lissome 68-year-old who looks half her age, older people are actively discouraged from remaining sexually vital by disapproving family members--and society in general.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 1996 | DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Highways, the Santa Monica performing arts center that is haven for avant-garde, gay and minority artists, has a long-standing tradition of really getting on the nerves of the conservative right. Witness last summer's flap over the brochure for the venue's Ecce Lesbo/Ecce Homo Summer Festival, which featured photos of partially unclothed performance artists as well as humorous, sexually explicit descriptions.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 1992 | ROBERT EPSTEIN
Joan Hotchkis is like a baserunner turning for home but then making the terrible discovery that she has missed a base. Gone wide at one corner. So she stops, turns and heads back, retracing the wild journey, getting through the confusion and the chase the right way this time. We'll leave the final call to some mythical umpire since the sixtysomething actress-writer and now producer is still out there running, shaking off the tag, going over old territories in new ways.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 1991 | JOHN GODFREY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
At the beginning of her one-woman show, Joan Hotchkis sings a few lilting bars from the Western ditty "Home on the Range." "Oh, give me a home where the buffalo roam/Where the deer and the antelope play/Where seldom is heard a discouraging word--" She stops abruptly. "That's a lie," Hotchkis says, staring hard at the audience, all music gone from her voice. "I heard a lot of discouraging words."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 1990 | JANICE ARKATOV
"I was brought up to be a different kind of woman than I turned out to be," explained actress Joan Hotchkis, whose solo performance work "Tearsheets: Letters I Didn't Send Home," opens this weekend at Highways in Santa Monica. "To do this piece, I had to break down some very strong taboos: that women should stay in their place, be inconspicuous, silent. So for me, it's like coming out--on the page and on the stage."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 2002
In Reed Johnson's excellent report on nudity in L.A. theater ("Bare Truths of Character," April 21), he neglected to mention one of the more effective and controversial uses of the naked body on the local stage. I'm referring to Joan Hotchkis' "Elements of Flesh," a solo performance on aging and sexuality that played at Highways and throughout the Southland in 1996-97. The sight of the elegant Hotchkis tastefully posed with bare buttocks and a coy smile, daring to be sexy at 68 years of age, flipped people out. The show generated hate mail, newspapers refused to print the production's ads, and even the beyond-liberal audiences of Highways called to complain and cancel their memberships.
NEWS
February 8, 1990 | MARY LOU LOPER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Carolina Herrera yellow, Carolina Herrera polka dots, Carolina Herrera checks, Carolina Herrera perfumes. Glamorous Carolina Herrera herself. Members of the Blue Ribbon at the Music Center flocked into The Founders Tuesday for a tribute to the couturiere and to see her spring collection, thanks to Neiman Marcus/Beverly Hills and its vice president John Martens. Co-chairwomen Joni Smith and Dorie Pinola sat together at the end of the fashion ramp, beaming that all was going so well.
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