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Joan Irvine Smith

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 1991
Thank you for publicly recognizing the generosity of Joan Irvine Smith (editorial, May 7). Her huge donation to UC Irvine and magnificent aid to various environmental organizations will make the world a better place. ANN ALPER Pacific Palisades
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2009 | Paloma Esquivel
There is a point, at the eastern edge of San Juan Capistrano, where Orange County's seemingly boundless labyrinth of tile-roofed homes, ranch-style boxes and multimillion-dollar estates gives way to a largely unspoiled expanse of rivers, canyons and trees. Here, with one border snuggled against the city's last neighborhoods and another ushering in the Santa Ana Mountains, is The Oaks, the 20-acre home of Joan Irvine Smith, her horses and her oak trees.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 1994 | LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joan Irvine Smith has settled her dispute with a Fallbrook art dealer she had accused of withholding more than $4 million in California Impressionist paintings he bought with her money, her lawyer said Wednesday. Russell Allen, lawyer for the 61-year-old granddaughter of the Irvine Co. founder, said the terms of her settlement with art dealer Michael Johnson are confidential. Smith filed the lawsuit a year ago in Orange County Superior Court, alleging breach of contract, among other complaints.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 2004 | Jeff Gottlieb, Times Staff Writer
When Orange County heiress and equestrian Joan Irvine Smith saw Christopher Reeve on TV in 1995, she was impressed not only by the actor but also by the fact that he didn't blame his horse for the injury that paralyzed him earlier that year. Smith wrote to Reeve, offering to donate $1 million to establish a spinal-cord research center at UC Irvine if he would donate his name. Not knowing Smith or UCI, Reeve did what celebrities do with so much of their mail: He threw it into his kook file.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 1992 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Real-estate heiress Joan Irvine Smith, who was possibly the year's biggest buyer of Southern California Impressionist paintings in the country, will open a temporary museum in an office tower here on Jan. 15 to exhibit the works she owns and others, a museum official said Wednesday. The Irvine Museum, to be located at 18881 Von Karman Ave.
NEWS
December 30, 1986 | ANN CONWAY, Times Society Writer
Ask Joan Irvine Smith how she wants to be identified, and she gives you body language--a silent, braid-tossing shrug. Heiress? Horsewoman? Businesswoman? The first two are are met with head-shaking silence. The third brings a cool-eyed "maybe." You remember that she admires, perhaps even identifies with, actress Katharine Hepburn. "A Katharine Hepburn-esque businesswoman?" Her iridescent pink, lipsticked mouth breaks into a wide smile. "There ya go," she says, laughing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1991
What would you get if you crossed J.R. Ewing with John Beresford Tipton, the philanthropic hero of that old TV show "The Millionaire"? Maybe Joan Irvine Smith? Smith, the Irvine family heiress, has fought a long "Dallas"-like legal battle with Irvine Co. chairman Donald L. Bren over the value of her stake in the company. But that's finally coming to a close, and Smith is deciding what to do with the $252.6-million check she will receive later this year.
BUSINESS
January 12, 1986 | LESLIE BERKMAN, Times Staff Writer
As a girl, Joan Irvine Smith rode horses over the rolling rangelands of the Irvine Ranch that was then her grandfather's place. At 52, the granddaughter of the founder of the Irvine Co., Orange County's mammoth land development firm, once more is riding horseback in the county--but this time at a stable she operates as a business on acreage outside the Irvine Ranch in San Juan Capistrano.
NEWS
February 13, 1988 | DARLENE SORDILLO, Times Staff Writer and Darlene Sordillo, an author of two books on horse training and competition, covers equestrian events for The Times. Her column appears every Saturday
"Come on, let me show you my place," says the horsewoman, her long, ash-blonde hair pulled back in a ponytail. She hops into her Mercedes and drives it like a buckboard across her 22-acre horse farm in San Juan Capistrano. Joan Irvine Smith, owner of the Oaks riding stable, was worlds away from the pressures of her business life. Relaxed and reflective, she walks through the cement aisles of her hunter-jumper barn and "talks horses" with an equestrian visitor.
NEWS
May 6, 1991 | ANN CONWAY
Joan Irvine Smith has a proposition for Donald L. Bren. If the billionaire pays her the money the Irvine Co. owes her before her Oaks Classic begins on May 31, Smith will increase its $50,000 grand prix to $100,000. "Where's my check?" Smith wondered last week at the Oaks, her tree-studded ranch in San Juan Capistrano. "The Irvine Co. has said the millions they owe me is nothing, that Donald can get it as easy as using a MasterCard charge."
OPINION
August 16, 2003
In "Who'd Want This Job?" (Commentary, Aug. 11), Charles E. Cook Jr. puts the blame for much of California's fiscal crisis where it squarely belongs -- on the shoulders of its citizens. Too many of us forgot that our government is a representative democracy. We wandered into the risky operations of a direct democracy. Using the initiative process, we disempowered our elected representatives, directly installed some of the state's most important financial measures and now, through the recall process, are trying to extricate the state from the crisis we helped to create.
MAGAZINE
June 9, 2002 | RICHARD E. CHEVERTON AND LAURA SAARI
It was a coming out, of sorts, although few of the 600 people crowded into the Corona del Mar elementary school auditorium sensed it on that fateful evening in mid-January 2001. To the seasoned (and probably cynical) observer, it was just another public hearing on yet another Orange County development plan. The "not-in-my-backyard" folks would protest; the environmentalists would squawk; then the public servants would depart and, soon thereafter, the bulldozers would rumble again.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 2001 | DARYL STRICKLAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After four generations of ownership, the reclusive Irvine family is selling one of the largest remaining parcels on Southern California's coast: a pristine, two-acre bluff-top site in Laguna Beach. The asking price for this oceanfront gem: an apparently unprecedented $40 million. If sold at or near that amount--and it is a big if in this shaky economy--the deal would set a record for residential land in Southern California, possibly anywhere in the country, brokers say.
NEWS
March 14, 2001 | DARYL STRICKLAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After four generations of ownership, the reclusive Irvine family is selling one of the largest remaining parcels on Southern California's coast--a pristine, two-acre, bluff-top site in Laguna Beach. The asking price for this oceanfront gem: an unprecedented $40 million. If the property is sold at or near that amount--and that is a big "if" in this shaky economy--it would set a record for residential land in Southern California, possibly anywhere in the country, according to brokers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2001 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two days after Christmas, as Laura Davick was rushing out the door of her rustic cottage at Crystal Cove State Park for an appointment, the phone rang. The voice at the other end said it was Joan Irvine Smith. Davick, an activist bent on stopping a $35-million resort in the park, thought one of her friends was pulling a prank. But she decided to play along.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1998
Philanthropist and heiress Joan Irvine Smith has been ordered to pay $86,000 to a caretaker who filed an age discrimination suit after he was fired from her Virginia estate. Floyd Litten, now 83, worked on Smith's estate in Fauquier County, Va., from 1972 to 1995. The order came in a ruling by the Virginia Supreme Court, affirming a lower court decision. Smith is the granddaughter of James Irvine II, founder of the Irvine Co., one of the biggest landowners in Southern California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1991 | TOM McQUEENEY and LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
For the first time since multimillionaire Joan Irvine Smith offered to help pay for local water projects, officials from four public water agencies met Monday night to discuss possible uses of her largess. The discussion was held less than a month after Smith asked the water districts to draft "wish lists" of projects that would increase Orange County's water independence by using previously unusable water.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 1991 | KRISTINA LINDGREN and LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
UC Irvine officials reacted with delight Wednesday to multimillionaire Joan Irvine Smith's plans to give the university a substantial chunk of the more than $250 million she expects to net from her long battle with the Irvine Co. Smith told The Times that she expects to donate millions of dollars to UCI for water quality studies, endowed chairs in engineering and a proposed law school, and for atmospheric ozone research and medical research facilities planned for the campus.
NEWS
June 6, 1998 | SCOTT MARTELLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A dead champion show horse and a rare parasite add up to murder in the eyes of Orange County philanthropist and breeder Joan Irvine Smith, who has posted a $10,000 reward for information on the death six weeks ago of her prized stallion South Pacific. The possible motive? Jealousy, Smith believes, over the success of her breeding program, centered on the $1.5-million horse who sired at least 14 top performers in show-jump competitions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1998 | SCOTT MARTELLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A dead champion show horse and a rare parasite add up to murder in the eyes of Orange County philanthropist and breeder Joan Irvine Smith, who has posted a $10,000 reward for information on the death seven weeks ago of her prized stallion, South Pacific. The possible motive? Jealousy over the success of Smith's breeding program, centered on the $1.5-million horse that has sired at least 14 top performers in show-jump competitions.
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