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Joan Jonas

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April 21, 1996 | Susan Morgan, Susan Morgan is an art writer based in Los Angeles
In a West Hollywood frame shop, the artist Joan Jonas balances on a footstool to survey a group of black and white photographs. As Reese Vogel, a master photographic printer based in Pasadena, unwraps the pictures and arranges them on an enormous work table, Jonas peers with apprehensive amazement at the images. Jonas speaks hesitantly, with disarming humor.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 1996 | Susan Morgan, Susan Morgan is an art writer based in Los Angeles
In a West Hollywood frame shop, the artist Joan Jonas balances on a footstool to survey a group of black and white photographs. As Reese Vogel, a master photographic printer based in Pasadena, unwraps the pictures and arranges them on an enormous work table, Jonas peers with apprehensive amazement at the images. Jonas speaks hesitantly, with disarming humor.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 1996
The Museum of Contemporary Art will present a performance art workshop with artist Joan Jonas on Saturday from 1 to 4 p.m. at MOCA's Temporary Contemporary facility at 152 N. Central Ave. The workshop will focus on Jonas' work, which is currently on view at MOCA TC's "1965-1975: Reconsidering the Object of Art." The workshop is free and open to participants 18 and older. Reservations are required to: (213) 621-1757.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 2007 | Christopher Knight
JONATHAN BUTTALL RICH BRITISH BOY He's been dead for slightly more than 200 years, but Jonathan Buttall (1752-1805) has a face more famous today than when he was alive. Thanks for that go to incomparable British portraitist Thomas Gainsborough and extravagant American art collector Henry Huntington, who bought the dazzling "Blue Boy" with much fanfare from the second Duke of Westminster in 1921 and brought the painting to Southern California.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2012 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
In 1969 and 1970, sculptor Michael Heizer displaced 240,000 tons of rock in the Nevada desert, cutting two enormous trenches, each one 50 feet deep and 30 feet wide and together spanning 1,500 feet, at the eastern edge of Mormon Mesa. In 1970, artist Robert Smithson marshaled heavy equipment to deposit rocks and rubble along a 1,500-foot-long path, starting at the shoreline of a remote section of Great Salt Lake, Utah, and spiraling out into the water. In 1977, Walter De Maria harnessed the potential energy of a distant patch of high desert in Western New Mexico by installing 400 stainless steel poles - effectively lightning rods, each one about 20 feet tall - in a grid pattern that measures one mile by one kilometer.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2006 | Tyler Green, Special to The Times
IN the late 1980s, Pamela Kramlich saw a work of video art by Peter Fischli and David Weiss titled "The Way Things Go." The 30-minute piece shows a perpetual-motion machine built by the artists: A car propelled by a kind of firecracker bumps into a bowling ball, which hits a piece of cardboard, which somehow leads to the ignition of a flammable substance in a saucepot -- and on and on. Kramlich loved it.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 1996 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Like other preeminent performance and video artists of her pioneering generation, Joan Jonas has experimented with various ways of presenting works, trying to find a form that does not require her constant physical presence yet still packs more punch than conventional videos. A rare and uneven exhibition of new works at Rosamund Felsen Gallery displays some recent attempts to transfer the raw intimacy of an ongoing performance to the static space of an art gallery.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 1986 | JOSINE IANCO-STARRELS
"Art Nouveau Jewelry by Rene Lalique" brings 47 pendants, necklaces, combs, tiaras, chest ornaments, bracelets and brooches plus 21 related drawings from the Calouste Gulbenkian Museum in Lisbon to the County Museum of Art, Thursday through Aug. 18. In addition, 10 Lalique pieces from American collections and 14 drawings from the Lalique family collection in Paris are on loan to the exhibition.
NEWS
December 31, 1992 | CATHY CURTIS, Cathy Curtis covers art for The Times Orange County Edition.
Elegant geometric paintings by Wassily Kandinsky in the same gallery as films of dancing geometric shapes, shot by Oscar Fischinger (who collaborated on "Fantasia")? Not every small museum has the resources to show such works side by side. But that's the kind of eclectic collection that the Long Beach Museum of Art owns, and the current exhibit, "Choice Encounters," (through Feb. 14) wisely takes full advantage of it.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 2009
Creature features return Several classic horror titles are stepping out of the crypt. "Creature From the Black Lagoon," the remake of the 1950s camp classic about a mythic monster who terrorizes scientists, and "The Brood," David Cronenberg's 1979 science-fiction/horror film about a woman who telepathically instructs her children to act out violently, are both landing new directors. Carl Rinsch, the hot commercials director who recently signed on to direct the samurai adventure "47 Ronin," is now in talks to direct Universal's "Black Lagoon," updating the story of the Gill-man and the Amazonian havoc he wreaks.
BUSINESS
March 18, 2004 | James F. Peltz, Times Staff Writer
Farmers & Merchants Bank of Long Beach is a community bank founded nearly a century ago by C.J. Walker that is still "in the hands of the Walker family," its website proudly points out. To some members of the Walker clan, that's just the problem. A dissident branch of Walker heirs who are F&M Bank shareholders -- led by Marcus Walker, one of C.J.'s great-grandsons -- is challenging the management of the closely held bank headed by his uncle, Chief Executive and President Kenneth G. Walker.
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