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Joan Lescot

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 1997 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
F. Andrew Leslie's stage adaptation of "The Lilies of the Field," a novel by William E. Barrett, looks like a stage adaptation of a novel, with its short, linear scenes and its adherence to the novel form. But it nevertheless can make for an affecting evening of theater. Modern miracles fascinate, and surely the relationship between veteran Homer Smith and a group of East German nuns, as they try to forge a life in a southwestern valley wasteland, is something of a miracle.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 1997 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
F. Andrew Leslie's stage adaptation of "The Lilies of the Field," a novel by William E. Barrett, looks like a stage adaptation of a novel, with its short, linear scenes and its adherence to the novel form. But it nevertheless can make for an affecting evening of theater. Modern miracles fascinate, and surely the relationship between veteran Homer Smith and a group of East German nuns, as they try to forge a life in a southwestern valley wasteland, is something of a miracle.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 2000 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mario and Joan Lescot, fixtures on the Orange County grass-roots theater scene since 1992, are taking over a Los Angeles stage institution, the Cast Theatre in Hollywood. The Cast, which houses separate 99- and 55-seat theaters, has been recognized as an incubator of new and adventurous work since the 1980s. But its tradition of steady, committed, in-house artistic and business leadership ended in 1999, and the Cast stopped producing its own shows last spring.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 1995 | M.E. WARREN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
You may have had your heart broken by Ken Kesey's unforgettable novel 'One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest" or been blown away by the 1975 film version, which won five major Oscars. Dale Wasserman's stage adaptation, yet another powerful retelling of the tragicomic adventures of R.P. McMurphy and his nuthouse pals, is being brought to vivid, memorable life by the Theatre District in Costa Mesa. If you know "Cuckoo's Nest," and especially if you don't, you don't want to miss it.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 1998 | T.H. McCULLOH
Silent-screen star Lillian Gish once recalled an incident in which a director told her to "act crazy" to portray an insane woman. She objected, realizing that madness is about interior desolation. For the most part, directors Mario and Joan Lescot have kept the acting crazy to a minimum in their revival of Dale Wasserman's "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest" at the Theatre District, but an actor's tendency to embellish can get out of hand.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 1996 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Laddy Sartin's "Catfish Moon," which had its West Coast premiere over the weekend at the Theatre District, is a pleasant, bittersweet little play that might be called a country cousin of Lanford Wilson's slight romantic comedies. The action is set in the rural South on an old abandoned fishing pier that Curley (Steve Howard) has just purchased, though he can't afford it. The lake smells to him like the "fragrance of paradise."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 1993 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The prevalence of blind-casting in theater today sometimes works, and sometimes not. In the case of the West Coast Performing Arts Center's production of the musical version of Dickens' "Oliver," at the Forum Theatre, it doesn't. Perhaps director Mario Lescot thought the youth of the two main characters would cloud the audience's mind. Christine Woods looks right for young Oliver, but her obvious femininity gives an odd flavor to her otherwise able performance.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 1996 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Evenings of one-acts are always a grab bag, even when they're all the work of as esteemed a playwright as Lanford Wilson. The program of Wilson's short plays being staged by Theatre District's satellite group, the BackLot Repertoire, under the direction of Shannon Hunt, is no exception. The one-act, because of its brevity, is much more difficult a form than the more leisurely full-length play.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 1995
In chronological order: * "Alegria," Cirque du Soleil, South Coast Plaza mall, January. The latest extravaganza from the biggest of all big tops featured 10-year-old contortionists from Mongolia, a Russian who danced in the air with a giant spinning cube, and an international troupe of acrobats who used trampolines, bars, and the trapeze to fly through the air with--you guessed it--the greatest of ease. State-of-the-art circus.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 1997 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
David Stevens' "The Sum of Us," now playing at the Theatre District, is a fascinating look into the lives of some very interesting people. Though set in Footscray, an industrial suburb of Melbourne, Australia, it could happen anywhere, and maybe it has. Harry Mitchell (Steve McCammon) is a single parent with a grown son who still lives with him. The son, Jeff (Jay Michael Fraley), is gay and lonely. Harry is lonely, too, since his wife died. Suddenly, Jeff meets Mr.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 1995 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The rough-textured, authentically Manhattan romantic comedy "Light Sensitive," by Jim Geoghan, is one of those plays that can look simplistic without performances of depth to give it a solid base beneath the deceptively bare-bones plot. Tom Hanratty (David Rousseve) was born and raised in Hell's Kitchen. Before he was blinded during a drunken spree with his pal Lou D'Marco (Steve McCammon), Tom was known as the "fastest white cabdriver in New York."
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