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September 4, 1992 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Itchey Foot restaurant is a hospitable venue for the five-woman musical revue "A . . . My Name Is Alice." A production of "Alice" has moved there following a successful run at Theatre 6470 in Hollywood. This spirited but hardly incisive show fits the Itchey Foot better than much of the weightier material that has been seen there.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 1992 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Itchey Foot restaurant is a hospitable venue for the five-woman musical revue "A . . . My Name Is Alice." A production of "Alice" has moved there following a successful run at Theatre 6470 in Hollywood. This spirited but hardly incisive show fits the Itchey Foot better than much of the weightier material that has been seen there.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 1989 | TERRY ATKINSON
Five important films that fared poorly at the Oscars should recoup some losses when they make their video debut this weekend. "Gorillas in the Mist" (MCA, $89.95, PG-13) is the story of Dian Fossey (Sigourney Weaver), who devoted her life to protecting the world's largest primates from the world's most destructive primates--and to changing people's ideas about the former's supposedly ferocious nature. Directed by Michael Apted ("Coal Miner's Daughter"), the film is intelligent, exciting and moving.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 1989 | TERRY ATKINSON
Five important films that fared poorly at the Oscars should recoup some losses when they make their video debut this weekend. "Gorillas in the Mist" (MCA, $89.95, PG-13) is the story of Dian Fossey (Sigourney Weaver), who devoted her life to protecting the world's largest primates from the world's most destructive primates--and to changing people's ideas about the former's supposedly ferocious nature. Directed by Michael Apted ("Coal Miner's Daughter"), the film is intelligent, exciting and moving.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 1988 | NANCY MILLS
Ten years ago, if a knowledgeable film person had been asked to make a list of working women directors in Hollywood, the list would have included Joan Micklin Silver and . . . well, it was a short list. In the 1970s Silver directed such features as "Hester Street," "Between the Lines" and "Head Over Heels" and became, if not quite a legend, at least a symbol of hope for those women on the outside of the male-dominated film business hoping to get in.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2009
Re "In Other Words," by Susan King, Dec. 29: While the feature film versions of F. Scott Fitzgerald's novels and stories are for the most part wanting (though from this vantage point, parts of the Kazan/Pinter "Last Tycoon" work very well), the best regarded film adaptation of a Fitzgerald story is probably "Bernice Bobs Her Hair" (1976), scripted and directed by Joan Micklin Silver for PBS' "The American Short Story." Silver and her young, talented cast really captured the feel and nuance of Fitzgerald's story; Shelley Duvall was outstanding as Bernice.
NEWS
November 11, 1993 | MARIA D. LASO
People who have been romantically pursued or dropped (for no perceivable good reason) will find a lot to relate to in "Chilly Scenes of Winter." The whimsical comedy stars John Heard as Charles Richardson, a guy hung up on his old girlfriend, Laura Connally (Mary Beth Hurt). The problem: After letting Charles pursue her for a while, Laura has moved back in with her husband, whom she had left once before.
NEWS
August 25, 1994 | MARK CHALON SMITH
The culture shock faced by Jewish immigrants in New York's Lower East Side near the turn of the century is at the anxious heart of "Hester Street." Directed by Joan Micklin Silver with a revealing eye for detail, the 1975 movie stars Steven Keats as a tailor eager to leave his Old World Jewish traditions behind as he almost desperately strives for an Americanized make-over.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 1988 | NANCY MILLS
Ten years ago, if a knowledgeable film person had been asked to make a list of working women directors in Hollywood, the list would have included Joan Micklin Silver and . . . well, it was a short list. In the 1970s Silver directed such features as "Hester Street," "Between the Lines" and "Head Over Heels" and became, if not quite a legend, at least a symbol of hope for those women on the outside of the male-dominated film business hoping to get in.
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