Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJoan Miro
IN THE NEWS

Joan Miro

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2012 | By David Ng
A painting by Joan Miro sold for $36.9 million at a London auction Tuesday. The Sotheby's sale of Miro's "Peinture (Etoile Bleue)" was an auction record for the late Spanish artist. The sale was part of a larger Sotheby's auction of Impressionist and modernist paintings by artists including Pissarro and Kandinsky. The auction, which brought in a reported $117.7 million, was the first of the London summer auction season. "Peinture (Etoile Bleue)" dates from 1927 and was purchased by its most recent owner in a Paris sale in 2007, according to Sotheby's.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2012 | By David Ng
A painting by Joan Miro sold for $36.9 million at a London auction Tuesday. The Sotheby's sale of Miro's "Peinture (Etoile Bleue)" was an auction record for the late Spanish artist. The sale was part of a larger Sotheby's auction of Impressionist and modernist paintings by artists including Pissarro and Kandinsky. The auction, which brought in a reported $117.7 million, was the first of the London summer auction season. "Peinture (Etoile Bleue)" dates from 1927 and was purchased by its most recent owner in a Paris sale in 2007, according to Sotheby's.
Advertisement
NEWS
February 2, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Police officials in Sweden and Denmark have uncovered what they described as the biggest art swindle in Scandinavia, seizing hundreds of forged etchings attributed to the Spanish artist Joan Miro. Swedish police said four Danish nationals had been arrested, one in Sweden and three in Denmark. The 380 etchings seized in Sweden and 500 others confiscated in Denmark had a market value of $13.5 million.
NEWS
March 9, 2011 | By Susan James, Special to The Times
The Tate Modern Art Museum in London, which opened in 2000 in a onetime power station, will open a major exhibition of the work of Spanish artist Joan MirÃ?³, called the father of Abstract Expressionism, on April 14. The show, featuring more than 150 works, is one of the most extensive shows ever dedicated to this  20th century artist and the first in London in half a century. The exhibition, "The Ladder of Escape,"  features rarely seen pieces that signpost the stages of MirÃ?
TRAVEL
February 9, 1986 | BETTY LOWRY, Lowry is a Wayland, Mass., free-lance writer. and
Picasso never spoke Spanish, only Catalan. He liked to be called "Don Pablo" and preferred the company of his bullfight cronies to the Beautiful People who were his best customers. In 1971 a Madrid art critic was jailed for daring to call Picasso Spain's greatest living artist while, at the same time in Barcelona, plans were under way for a Picasso Museum. Joan Miro wintered in Paris, but spent his summers on the family homestead near Barcelona.
NEWS
March 9, 2011 | By Susan James, Special to The Times
The Tate Modern Art Museum in London, which opened in 2000 in a onetime power station, will open a major exhibition of the work of Spanish artist Joan MirÃ?³, called the father of Abstract Expressionism, on April 14. The show, featuring more than 150 works, is one of the most extensive shows ever dedicated to this  20th century artist and the first in London in half a century. The exhibition, "The Ladder of Escape,"  features rarely seen pieces that signpost the stages of MirÃ?
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 1987 | WILLIAM WILSON, Times Art Critic
With proper care and feeding, the reputation of an established artist can last a lifetime, even if his later works are pretty awful. The acid test for living icons such as Picasso, Calder, Moore and that Olympian lot comes after they die. Fame's buzzards sit hungrily on blasted branches of status waiting for that first big posthumous retrospective. Is the great man going to be immortalized or will the parching clay of time crack and fissure?
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 1993 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Suzanne Muchnic is The Times' art writer
When they converged in San Francisco about 45 years ago, Wolfgang Paalen, Gordon Onslow Ford and Lee Mullican wanted nothing less than to be image makers of cosmic freedom. The purpose of art, they thought, was self-transcending awareness.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 1990 | PENELOPE McMILLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the surface, the thieves seemed sophisticated. They carefully targeted fine art prints created by mainstream contemporary and modern artists, whose pieces command thousands of dollars. Yet the artwork, taken from a number of upscale galleries around Los Angeles, often ended up folded or creased, visibly damaged in the process of being hidden inside clothing during the thefts.
NEWS
October 13, 1991 | Associated Press
Five Surrealist paintings by Paul Klee and Joan Miro have been given to the Art Institute of Chicago by the estate of a local artist and collector. Claire Ziesler, who died last month at the age of 88, was a major collector of Klee's work. She had decided in 1987 that the works would go to the institute upon her death.
NEWS
February 2, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Police officials in Sweden and Denmark have uncovered what they described as the biggest art swindle in Scandinavia, seizing hundreds of forged etchings attributed to the Spanish artist Joan Miro. Swedish police said four Danish nationals had been arrested, one in Sweden and three in Denmark. The 380 etchings seized in Sweden and 500 others confiscated in Denmark had a market value of $13.5 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 1987 | WILLIAM WILSON, Times Art Critic
With proper care and feeding, the reputation of an established artist can last a lifetime, even if his later works are pretty awful. The acid test for living icons such as Picasso, Calder, Moore and that Olympian lot comes after they die. Fame's buzzards sit hungrily on blasted branches of status waiting for that first big posthumous retrospective. Is the great man going to be immortalized or will the parching clay of time crack and fissure?
TRAVEL
February 9, 1986 | BETTY LOWRY, Lowry is a Wayland, Mass., free-lance writer. and
Picasso never spoke Spanish, only Catalan. He liked to be called "Don Pablo" and preferred the company of his bullfight cronies to the Beautiful People who were his best customers. In 1971 a Madrid art critic was jailed for daring to call Picasso Spain's greatest living artist while, at the same time in Barcelona, plans were under way for a Picasso Museum. Joan Miro wintered in Paris, but spent his summers on the family homestead near Barcelona.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 1991 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Klees and Miros to Chicago: Five Surrealist paintings by Paul Klee and Joan Miro have been given to the Art Institute of Chicago by the estate of a local artist and collector. Claire Ziesler, who died last month at age 88, was a major collector of Klee's work. She had decided in 1987 that the works would go to the institute upon her death.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2004 | From Associated Press
Caroline Weiss Law, whose father founded the oil company that later became Exxon Mobil, has willed more than $100 million in endowments and artwork to the Houston Museum of Fine Arts. Law, who died on her 85th birthday Dec. 24, left 52 major contemporary artworks, valued between $60 million and $85 million, and $25 million to establish an endowment at the museum.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|