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Joan Mitchell

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June 12, 2011 | By Suzanne Muchnic, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Joan Mitchell Lady Painter Patricia Albers Alfred A. Knopf: 517 pp., $40 Joan Mitchell didn't suffer fools. The famously cantankerous artist didn't suffer many friends either. If biographer Patricia Albers sizes up her subject accurately, Mitchell's scattershot rage was fallout from a nearly lifelong battle to prove herself to a father "who never let her forget that he needed a son, not a daughter" and to an art world that had little respect for women's work. Mitchell retaliated by calling herself a "lady painter" while emulating the worst behavior of her male colleagues.
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October 9, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
Together, Joan Mitchell and Jasper Johns would seem to be an unlikely pair of inspirations for a new body of paintings, but there they are hovering in the background of 10 lovely recent works by Mark Dutcher. Two kinds of nominal handwriting -- gestural abstraction and a recognizable vocabulary of painted signs -- slip and slide across the surfaces of his canvases, as if perpetually merging and fading away. Most of Dutcher's paintings at Coagula Curatorial are of a size (4 ½ feet tall)
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NEWS
October 31, 1992
Joan Mitchell, 66, prize-winning American abstract artist greatly influenced by Monet. A native of Chicago, Miss Mitchell settled in France in 1969, living in Paris and the town of Vetheuil, where the Impressionist master Claude Monet had done much of his work. Her large canvasses, which have been exhibited at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, combined expressionism with sensuous forms and colors. She received France's National Grand Prize for Painting in 1969.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2011 | By Suzanne Muchnic, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Joan Mitchell Lady Painter Patricia Albers Alfred A. Knopf: 517 pp., $40 Joan Mitchell didn't suffer fools. The famously cantankerous artist didn't suffer many friends either. If biographer Patricia Albers sizes up her subject accurately, Mitchell's scattershot rage was fallout from a nearly lifelong battle to prove herself to a father "who never let her forget that he needed a son, not a daughter" and to an art world that had little respect for women's work. Mitchell retaliated by calling herself a "lady painter" while emulating the worst behavior of her male colleagues.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 1994
Being known as the "second generation" has a rather depressing sound, as if you were incapable of doing much but imitating your forebears. But the second-generation Abstract Expressionists, as they are known, are a worthy group in their own right. Although these painters didn't make the initial breakthroughs, their personal discoveries enriched the vocabulary of abstraction. And while the first generation was overwhelmingly male, the second wave included several women.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 1988
I can't say it was a pleasure to have my own memories of encounters with Madame Mitchell revived by William Wilson's article on Joan Mitchell, but he was right on ("Abstracting an Abstract Expressionist," June 19). Fortunately, her capacity for leaving interviewers totally unstrung is exceeded by her ability to turn out those glorious paintings year after year. MERLE SCHIPPER Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
Together, Joan Mitchell and Jasper Johns would seem to be an unlikely pair of inspirations for a new body of paintings, but there they are hovering in the background of 10 lovely recent works by Mark Dutcher. Two kinds of nominal handwriting -- gestural abstraction and a recognizable vocabulary of painted signs -- slip and slide across the surfaces of his canvases, as if perpetually merging and fading away. Most of Dutcher's paintings at Coagula Curatorial are of a size (4 ½ feet tall)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 1988 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Times Art Writer
"I am not a member of the make ugly school," Joan Mitchell told an interviewer way back in 1956, when she began to win notice in New York as an Abstract Expressionist painter. Not then. Not now. Probably not ever, as we see in a 37-year retrospective of her paintings at the La Jolla Museum of Contemporary Art (to Jan. 29).
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 2004 | Suzanne Muchnic
Ken Tyler, an American print publisher who has worked with leading contemporary artists since the 1960s, has donated 460 prints to the Tate Gallery in London. The gift of works by 28 artists, including David Hockney, James Rosenquist, Joan Mitchell and Michael Heizer, is the largest donation of prints ever received by the gallery and the final installment in a series of gifts from Tyler's collection to museums around the world. Tyler, who began printmaking in Chicago, co-founded Gemini G.E.L.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 1988 | MARLENA DONOHUE
An up-close and personal show of some half a dozen paintings by Joan Mitchell spans 30 years and reminds us that, at its best, Abstract Expressionism is timeless and energetic. What's most touted about the New York school is its shoot-from-the-hip bravura; what needs to be stressed is that the folks who did the style justice possessed and exercised an instinctive sense of formal harmony and compositional and chromatic balance.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 1994
Being known as the "second generation" has a rather depressing sound, as if you were incapable of doing much but imitating your forebears. But the second-generation Abstract Expressionists, as they are known, are a worthy group in their own right. Although these painters didn't make the initial breakthroughs, their personal discoveries enriched the vocabulary of abstraction. And while the first generation was overwhelmingly male, the second wave included several women.
NEWS
October 31, 1992
Joan Mitchell, 66, prize-winning American abstract artist greatly influenced by Monet. A native of Chicago, Miss Mitchell settled in France in 1969, living in Paris and the town of Vetheuil, where the Impressionist master Claude Monet had done much of his work. Her large canvasses, which have been exhibited at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, combined expressionism with sensuous forms and colors. She received France's National Grand Prize for Painting in 1969.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 1988 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Times Art Writer
"I am not a member of the make ugly school," Joan Mitchell told an interviewer way back in 1956, when she began to win notice in New York as an Abstract Expressionist painter. Not then. Not now. Probably not ever, as we see in a 37-year retrospective of her paintings at the La Jolla Museum of Contemporary Art (to Jan. 29).
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 1988
I can't say it was a pleasure to have my own memories of encounters with Madame Mitchell revived by William Wilson's article on Joan Mitchell, but he was right on ("Abstracting an Abstract Expressionist," June 19). Fortunately, her capacity for leaving interviewers totally unstrung is exceeded by her ability to turn out those glorious paintings year after year. MERLE SCHIPPER Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 1987 | MARLENA DONOHUE
Over the years, Red Grooms has used his special brand of vernacular caricature to poke sophisticated fun at the rich and famous of arts and letters. Recently, an East Coast show featured pencil drawings of famous New York School personalities, including a look at the fabled Cedar Bar hang-out, complete with Jackson Pollock and Willem de Kooning locked in mortal combat and Clement Greenberg shaking a polemic figure at a staid Harold Rosenberg. A current show offers L.A.
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