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Joan Mondale

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NEWS
August 20, 1987 | SARAH BOOTH CONROY, The Washington Post
Fritz and Joan Mondale are going home this week. Home from Washington to Minneapolis. Home from national to state--even local--politics. After 23 years as cornerstones of the capital, they're going way, way beyond the Capital Beltway--for Washingtonians, like going beyond the pale. They're going home at the time of year when all of Congress leaves to water the grass roots. But when Congress reconvenes in September, Mondale will be practicing law in Minneapolis.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 2014
John Cacavas Composer's career was helped by Telly Savalas John Cacavas, 83, a composer, arranger and conductor who parlayed his friendship with actor Telly Savalas into a prolific career scoring music for film and television, including a theme to "Kojak," died Jan. 28 at his home in Beverly Hills, his family announced. He had been in declining health. While working in London in the early 1970s, Cacavas met Savalas. He agreed to produce an album for the actor, who promised to help the composer get into the film business.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 2014
John Cacavas Composer's career was helped by Telly Savalas John Cacavas, 83, a composer, arranger and conductor who parlayed his friendship with actor Telly Savalas into a prolific career scoring music for film and television, including a theme to "Kojak," died Jan. 28 at his home in Beverly Hills, his family announced. He had been in declining health. While working in London in the early 1970s, Cacavas met Savalas. He agreed to produce an album for the actor, who promised to help the composer get into the film business.
NEWS
August 20, 1987 | SARAH BOOTH CONROY, The Washington Post
Fritz and Joan Mondale are going home this week. Home from Washington to Minneapolis. Home from national to state--even local--politics. After 23 years as cornerstones of the capital, they're going way, way beyond the Capital Beltway--for Washingtonians, like going beyond the pale. They're going home at the time of year when all of Congress leaves to water the grass roots. But when Congress reconvenes in September, Mondale will be practicing law in Minneapolis.
NATIONAL
February 2, 2009 | Robin Abcarian
Vice President Joe Biden often joked on the campaign trail about his wife's lofty educational achievements. She had two master's degrees and had already worked for nearly a quarter-century as a college community instructor. But he had a better idea. "Why don't you go out and get a doctorate and make us some real money?" he said he told her. (That was always good for a laugh, especially in university towns.
FOOD
December 26, 1991 | ROSE DOSTI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
DEAR SOS: I've had a delicious Chinese walnut soup for dessert at Harbor Village Restaurant in Monterey Park. I think your readers will love it. If you sample it, you'll agree. --JEANETTE DEAR JEANETTE: Harbor Village restaurant sent us the recipe, which should make for interesting conversation. The soup dessert is served as pudding at the end of a banquet meal in Chinese restaurants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 2011 | Times staff and wire reports
Eleanor Mondale, the vivacious daughter of former Vice President Walter Mondale who was a television entertainment reporter, radio show host and occasional magnet for gossip, died Saturday at her Minnesota home, a family spokeswoman said. She was 51. "Our wonderful daughter … after her long and gutsy battle against cancer, went up to heaven last night," the former vice president said in a statement emailed to friends. Mondale had left her job co-hosting a weekday morning radio show in Minneapolis in 2009 when she announced the return of brain cancer.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 1992 | SHAUNA SNOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Adolfo V. Nodal, general manager of Los Angeles' Cultural Affairs Department, met this week with members of President-elect Bill Clinton's transition team, fueling rumors that Nodal is a candidate to head the National Endowment for the Arts. Nodal was in Little Rock on Wednesday to lead a conference on urban design issues organized by the Clinton team.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 1985 | HILLIARD HARPER, San Diego County Arts Writer
Organ-arily there's not much to pipe about the king of instruments in San Diego County. Now there may be cause for chatter at least, if not long-winded discussions. Our ears pricked up when organist Robert Thompson gave up a comfortable college post he had held for 16 years to come to San Diego. Why would an accomplished musician (and choirmaster) who has concertized regularly throughout the organ country of the great Upper Midwest relinquish his teaching and performing duties at St.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 1992 | DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A decision this week by the acting chairwoman of National Endowment for the Arts to overturn grant recommendations to three gay and lesbian film festivals has spurred threats of a lawsuit against the NEA. The act has also spurred outrage among other arts organizations and individuals involved in the ongoing battle between the NEA and the arts community over content.
NEWS
January 24, 1986 | MARYLOUISE OATES, Times Staff Writer
Danny Kaye put his fingers in his mouth and whistled the intimate, top-drawer crowd to attention. He was allowed, even though it was the elegant Founders Room at the Music Center. Kaye and playwright Neil Simon were honored Wednesday night as $1 million-plus contributors--but the talk was also of baseball. No surprise, among fervent Dodgers' fans like owner Peter O'Malley, Kaye, his close friend Olive Behrendt (who organized the party) and Roz Wyman.
NEWS
March 7, 1985 | BETTY CUNIBERTI, Times Staff Writer
Some men move mountains. Some photograph them. A few have mountains named after them. Ansel Adams did all three, and with unparalleled style. The famous photographer and environmentalist who captured the wonders of Yosemite National Park and other natural splendors for about 70 years spent the last five years of his life poring over 40,000 negatives to choose a museum set of 75 that would represent a broad scope of his best work.
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