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ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 1999 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Home Vision released three French films on video this week, ranging from a world classic to kitschy camp. Carl Dreyer's astonishing silent "The Passion of Joan of Arc" ($30), produced in 1928, is one of the greatest films ever made--a riveting, tragic retelling of the famed French martyr based on documentation from her original trial. Masterfully photographed by Rudolf Mate, who later directed films in Hollywood, the film features vivid, near-surreal close-ups of Joan and her inquisitors.
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NEWS
October 31, 2013 | By Amy Hubbard
Happy Halloween! The holiday this year brings an interactive Google Doodle that spotlights a cauldron-stirring witch. Click through to play games like whack-a-mole with bony skeleton hands reaching out of the ground. The green, warty old crone is in the "Macbeth" mode, but "the notion of that character of a witch goes back to the Old Testament," said Stacy Tilney, director of communications at Massachusetts' Salem Witch Museum. "We point to Joan of Arc, called a sorceress," Tilney said in an interview Thursday with the Los Angeles Times.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 1996
"Joan of Arc in History and Film," a conference sponsored by the UCLA Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies and the Florence Gould Foundation of New York, will be held through Saturday at UCLA's Melnitz Theater and its faculty center. The event will include Jacques Rivette's "Joan the Maid: The Battles" (1994) which screens today at 7 p.m., and its second part, "Joan the Maid: The Prisons," screens Saturday at 2 p.m., followed by a panel discussion at 5 p.m. Today two sessions at 9:30 a.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2012 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
"The Undefeated," a documentary about former Alaskan governor and vice-presidential candidate Sarah Palin drawn from her memoir, "Going Rogue: An American Life," seems to have been made as a piece of political promotion for the 2012 presidential race. But before "The Undefeated" premiered in a tiny number of theaters, Palin announced that she would not run. The film did not do well, either financially or critically. Now it has found a secondary purpose — running on Reelz Channel as an answer to the much-touted HBO film "Game Change.
SCIENCE
February 18, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
A team of scientists hopes to crack one of the layers of mystery surrounding 15th century French heroine Joan of Arc: Could a rib and other fragments recovered after she was burned at the stake be hers? Eighteen experts plan a battery of tests on the few remains reportedly recovered from the pyre where the 19-year-old was burned alive for heresy -- including a rib bone and some skin.
BOOKS
May 24, 1987
Re: Janice Mall's review of Andrea Dworkin's "Intercourse" (The Book Review, May 3): Radical feminist Mary Daly has said that "one of the most dispiriting experiences imaginable is to encounter in a woman an apparent inability to experience moral outrage at the atrocities perpetrated against her sex." Andrea Dworkin's book is about the atrocities done to women through the practice of intercourse, yet Janice Mall wishes the book were about the violence among men. (Good heavens, they might hurt themselves!
OPINION
January 4, 2012 | By Nancy Goldstone
On Jan. 6, people around the world will come together to celebrate the 600th anniversary of the birth of St. Joan of Arc, the brave peasant girl from the French countryside who in 1429 lifted the English siege of Orléans, walloped the enemy army and led her king to be crowned at Reims. French President Nicolas Sarkozy plans a special visit to the village of Domremy, her birthplace. There will be a parade at 6 o'clock in New Orleans, a French pilgrimage retracing the route that led to Joan's martyrdom at the stake in Rouen, prestigious classical music concerts and ceremonial viewings of Carl Theodor Dryer's silent-screen masterpiece, "The Passion of Joan of Arc. " And how typical of the magic of Joan's story that she should have been born on so important a Christian holiday, the Feast of the Epiphany, celebrating Christ's baptism and the coming of the Magi.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2008 | KENNETH TURAN
With only a week left before the crush of fall films begins in earnest, this might be a good time to take a step back and immerse yourself in one of cinema's classics. Carl Dreyer's 1928 "The Passion of Joan of Arc," with Maria Falconetti in the title role in a rare screen appearance, is one of the acknowledged masterworks of the late silent period. See it one time only with a modern electronic score played live by Klive and Nigel Humberstone, collectively known as In the Nursery.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 1994 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The American Cinematheque's formidable but richly rewarding "Cahiers du Cinema Selects Recent French Films" opens Friday at 7 p.m.
WORLD
January 7, 2012 | By Devorah Lauter, Los Angeles Times
  Escorted by knights on horseback, a horde of former Joans of Arc paraded this year's Joan through the darkened streets of a city liberated by their namesake nearly six centuries ago. They were headed to Sainte-Croix Cathedral, where, like a martial Rose Queen, she was handed her sword. As the cathedral filled Friday night to celebrate the 600th birthday of a teenage girl who claimed to hear the voice of God, medieval maidens wearing flowing headdresses giggled on cellphones, bagpipe players from Nantes huddled in a corner and the knights in shining armor wandered through the crowd.
WORLD
January 7, 2012 | By Devorah Lauter, Los Angeles Times
  Escorted by knights on horseback, a horde of former Joans of Arc paraded this year's Joan through the darkened streets of a city liberated by their namesake nearly six centuries ago. They were headed to Sainte-Croix Cathedral, where, like a martial Rose Queen, she was handed her sword. As the cathedral filled Friday night to celebrate the 600th birthday of a teenage girl who claimed to hear the voice of God, medieval maidens wearing flowing headdresses giggled on cellphones, bagpipe players from Nantes huddled in a corner and the knights in shining armor wandered through the crowd.
OPINION
January 4, 2012 | By Nancy Goldstone
On Jan. 6, people around the world will come together to celebrate the 600th anniversary of the birth of St. Joan of Arc, the brave peasant girl from the French countryside who in 1429 lifted the English siege of Orléans, walloped the enemy army and led her king to be crowned at Reims. French President Nicolas Sarkozy plans a special visit to the village of Domremy, her birthplace. There will be a parade at 6 o'clock in New Orleans, a French pilgrimage retracing the route that led to Joan's martyrdom at the stake in Rouen, prestigious classical music concerts and ceremonial viewings of Carl Theodor Dryer's silent-screen masterpiece, "The Passion of Joan of Arc. " And how typical of the magic of Joan's story that she should have been born on so important a Christian holiday, the Feast of the Epiphany, celebrating Christ's baptism and the coming of the Magi.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2008 | KENNETH TURAN
With only a week left before the crush of fall films begins in earnest, this might be a good time to take a step back and immerse yourself in one of cinema's classics. Carl Dreyer's 1928 "The Passion of Joan of Arc," with Maria Falconetti in the title role in a rare screen appearance, is one of the acknowledged masterworks of the late silent period. See it one time only with a modern electronic score played live by Klive and Nigel Humberstone, collectively known as In the Nursery.
SCIENCE
April 7, 2007 | From the Associated Press
A rib bone supposedly found at the site where French heroine Joan of Arc was burned at the stake is actually that of an Egyptian mummy, according to researchers who used high-tech science to expose the fake. The bone, a piece of cloth and a cat femur were said to have been recovered after the 19-year-old was burned in 1431 in the town of Rouen. In 1909 -- the year Joan of Arc was beatified -- scientists declared it "highly probable" that the relics were hers.
SCIENCE
February 18, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
A team of scientists hopes to crack one of the layers of mystery surrounding 15th century French heroine Joan of Arc: Could a rib and other fragments recovered after she was burned at the stake be hers? Eighteen experts plan a battery of tests on the few remains reportedly recovered from the pyre where the 19-year-old was burned alive for heresy -- including a rib bone and some skin.
OPINION
May 23, 2005 | Luis Alberto Urrea, Journalist and novelist Luis Alberto Urrea is the author "The Hummingbird's Daughter," a fictionalized life of his cousin Teresita published last week by Little, Brown.
I was there to research a book. The curanderas (healer women) of Cuernavaca had agreed to meet with me and discuss the secrets of their trade. They lived in a modest house, and later in the night they offered me a plastic bowl of green Jell-O. Nothing magical. No one was burning incense, burning candles, sprinkling holy water or chanting mantras. A very noisy, very bad ranchero band was playing in the neighbor's yard to celebrate a barrio wedding.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2003 | Rone Tempest, Times Staff Writer
To some, she was an environmental Joan of Arc, patron saint of the Save the Redwoods movement and tree-sitting bane of the Northern California timber industry. To Berkeley writer Kate Coleman, she was a fascinating cross between nuclear whistle-blower Karen Silkwood and the late anarchist Emma Goldman. Environmental activist Judi Bari died of breast cancer six years ago in a Mendocino County cabin. She was 47.
BOOKS
March 12, 2000 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
Her austerity demands a command of the facts, which Mary Gordon bows to. White doves and butterflies aside, she was a human, a girl, born in 1412 and burned to death in 1431. She had three brothers, was born into a peasant family in France and at 12 began hearing voices. The voices told her that she must crown the dauphin, Charles, king of France. At 17 she told her parents she was going to help a cousin give birth and never returned.
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