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Joan Of Arcadia Television Program

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BUSINESS
May 19, 2005 | Meg James, Times Staff Writer
Providing clear evidence that viewers under 50 are most important to TV networks, CBS on Wednesday announced that it had canceled four shows -- including one critics' favorite -- whose audiences are among the oldest in network television. "They called us the geezer network," CBS Chairman and Viacom Inc. Co-President Leslie Moonves told more than 2,000 advertising buyers and their clients gathered in Carnegie Hall.
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BUSINESS
May 19, 2005 | Meg James, Times Staff Writer
Providing clear evidence that viewers under 50 are most important to TV networks, CBS on Wednesday announced that it had canceled four shows -- including one critics' favorite -- whose audiences are among the oldest in network television. "They called us the geezer network," CBS Chairman and Viacom Inc. Co-President Leslie Moonves told more than 2,000 advertising buyers and their clients gathered in Carnegie Hall.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2003 | Ralph Cohen
Television networks are desperate for successful sitcoms this season, which seem to be in short supply. So it stands to reason they would copy CBS' highly touted "Joan of Arcadia." In the new series, God appears to a high school student, Joan, in a variety of forms, such as a TV newsman or a local teenager, and each time has a cryptic message that alters Joan's life. Not to be outdone, the other networks are developing their own sitcoms with otherworldly communications.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2003 | Ralph Cohen
Television networks are desperate for successful sitcoms this season, which seem to be in short supply. So it stands to reason they would copy CBS' highly touted "Joan of Arcadia." In the new series, God appears to a high school student, Joan, in a variety of forms, such as a TV newsman or a local teenager, and each time has a cryptic message that alters Joan's life. Not to be outdone, the other networks are developing their own sitcoms with otherworldly communications.
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