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Joan Petersilia

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OPINION
October 13, 2007
Re "Parole, the right way," Opinion, Oct. 8 The purpose of prison is to eliminate dangerousness from an individual through lock-up and rehabilitation. If California is intent on releasing dangerous felons, we have definitely failed in that mission. The state should scrutinize inmates to determine levels of dangerousness and, when it finds an inmate to be a low risk, release him. Nedra Lynette Inglewood Joan Petersilia ignores the fact that sex offenders are the least likely to offend again.
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OPINION
October 13, 2007
Re "Parole, the right way," Opinion, Oct. 8 The purpose of prison is to eliminate dangerousness from an individual through lock-up and rehabilitation. If California is intent on releasing dangerous felons, we have definitely failed in that mission. The state should scrutinize inmates to determine levels of dangerousness and, when it finds an inmate to be a low risk, release him. Nedra Lynette Inglewood Joan Petersilia ignores the fact that sex offenders are the least likely to offend again.
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OPINION
December 27, 1992
In response to "Break the Addiction to Punishment," Commentary, Dec. 14: Joan Petersilia and Peter Reuter of RAND Corp. point out that imprisonment for criminal drug offenses is costly and ineffective and recommend that treatment programs be substituted for jail terms. Eliminating jail terms for drug use is a desirable step; after all, drug use by itself harms only the user. Substituting treatment programs, though, is wishful thinking because treatment programs for drug users are not effective for individuals assigned to them by courts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1985
California should not be surprised that a new study shows that felons recently placed on probation are committing more serious crimes than before. The state is asking many of its probation officers to handle tougher cases with fewer resources for supervising them, or even keeping track of them. The study, by the Rand Corp., starts with ways in which the nature of probation has changed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1992 | PENELOPE McMILLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two women, one an African-American, were among the top three members of the executive staff named Wednesday by incoming Los Angeles County Dist. Atty. Gil Garcetti, as he restructured parts of the office to "restore public confidence." Sandra Buttitta, who now heads the sexual crimes/child abuse division, will be chief assistant district attorney and the first woman to hold the No. 2 post.
NEWS
October 11, 1990 | LORETTA SCHERTZ KELLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Pasadena church officials have launched a local chapter of an acclaimed program that brings criminals face to face with their victims to promote restitution and mutual understanding. The Foothill Victim Offender Reconciliation Program last week had its first training sessions for volunteer mediators. Program director Timothy Cooper, 38, an associate pastor of Pasadena Mennonite Church, said the organization expects to begin handling cases this month.
OPINION
February 10, 1985
The two articles about the Rand Corp. study of probation (Times, Feb. 3) are disturbing. The study reports that 65% of the men convicted of felonies and placed on probation were arrested again, with 75% of those arrested charged with serious crimes. Joan Petersilia, director of the study, cautions that misreading the report could bring down an unjustified storm of criticism agaisnt probation. I believe The Times article does precisely what Petersilia warns against. The article quotes the Rand study, "probation appears to be heading toward an impasse, if not a total breakdown," adding this interpretation, "unless substantially more funds for probation--not for building prisons--and a "clear mandate" for probation to make the best use of the resources they have.
SCIENCE
January 11, 2007 | Alan Zarembo, Times Staff Writer
During their first two weeks out of prison, ex-convicts face nearly 13 times greater risk of death than the general population, according to a study of more than 30,000 former inmates published today. The leading cause was overdose of illegal narcotics, the researchers found.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 2009 | Maria L. La Ganga, Maura Dolan and Molly Hennessy-Fiske
Dawn Cordy always knew her neighborhood was an easy place to hide -- a semirural San Francisco suburb where housing is cheap, sheriff's cruisers rarely appear, residents don't snoop and registered sex offenders have found a refuge. It's a small, scruffy, unincorporated island largely surrounded by the hard-knock city of Antioch, a region synonymous with the foreclosure crisis in the Bay Area but now linked to yet another outrage. This is where Phillip Garrido, who was charged last week with rape and kidnapping, allegedly held Jaycee Lee Dugard for 18 years and fathered her two children in a warren of tents and soundproofed outbuildings behind his gray cinder-block house on Walnut Avenue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 2007 | Nancy Vogel, Times Staff Writer
Until California eases prison overcrowding, it can't slow the revolving prison doors that return roughly 70% of freed inmates within a year, national experts reported to the Legislature on Friday.
NEWS
January 31, 1991 | TED ROHRLICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a bleak assessment of a popular, experimental anti-crime program, the RAND Corp. has found that increased supervision alone does not dissuade felony probationers from committing more crimes. The study, released this week by the Santa Monica-based think tank, found that adult probationers who were placed in these programs had arrest, conviction and incarceration rates similar to or higher than those placed on probation with routine supervision.
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