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Joan Plowright

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December 1, 2005 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
Veteran British actress Joan Plowright may have waited more than half a century for a starring role in a feature film, but that didn't stop her from turning down the juicy lead -- twice -- in the drama "Mrs. Palfrey at the Claremont." "I know those film hours, and 14 hours a day is not much good for me anymore," explained Plowright, 76. "So I had to say 'We wouldn't do a proper job. We would be so tired by the end of the day.'
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NEWS
December 1, 2005 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
Veteran British actress Joan Plowright may have waited more than half a century for a starring role in a feature film, but that didn't stop her from turning down the juicy lead -- twice -- in the drama "Mrs. Palfrey at the Claremont." "I know those film hours, and 14 hours a day is not much good for me anymore," explained Plowright, 76. "So I had to say 'We wouldn't do a proper job. We would be so tired by the end of the day.'
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 1993 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Joan Plowright and Laurence Olivier met in the cast of "The Entertainer" at London's Royal Court Theatre in 1956. They re-created their roles in the film version released in 1960. (Far from Shakespeare, it may nevertheless be Olivier's finest screen performance.) They were married in Connecticut in 1961, while starring on Broadway, he in "Becket" and she in "A Taste of Honey," for which she won a Tony.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 1996 | VALERIE GROVE, THE TIMES OF LONDON
Joan Plowright has reached the stage at which she might be expected to do grand dame roles, which she has turned down in recent years. Instead, she is being Francoise Gilot's grandmother in "Surviving Picasso" and the nanny in Disney's "101 Dalmatians," playing midwife to Pongo's 15 puppies. Such roles are not to be scorned: "When you get such interesting and amusing film roles," she says, "it doesn't seem dreadfully exciting to be in the 257th revival of [the 19th century play] 'The Rivals.'
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 1996 | VALERIE GROVE, THE TIMES OF LONDON
Joan Plowright has reached the stage at which she might be expected to do grand dame roles, which she has turned down in recent years. Instead, she is being Francoise Gilot's grandmother in "Surviving Picasso" and the nanny in Disney's "101 Dalmatians," playing midwife to Pongo's 15 puppies. Such roles are not to be scorned: "When you get such interesting and amusing film roles," she says, "it doesn't seem dreadfully exciting to be in the 257th revival of [the 19th century play] 'The Rivals.'
NEWS
May 1, 1994 | SUSAN KING
Renowned British actress Joan Plowright has a lot in common with Dorothy Kilgore, the character she plays in the new "Hallmark Hall of Fame" drama "A Place for Annie." They're both strong-willed widows whose children have left the nest. And both seem to be warm, friendly and good-hearted. Plowright, who was married for nearly 30 years to legendary British actor Lord Laurence Olivier, has been working almost nonstop in features and TV movies since his death in 1989.
NEWS
July 28, 1996 | Kevin Thomas
Richard Frankrin's 1995 film of Hannie Rayson's play is a classic intimate drama of reunion, as three sisters--widower Hillary (Caroline Gillmer), Manhattan-based Pippa (Tara Morice) and longtime London resident Meg (Caroline Goodall)--gather at their family home in the seaside resort of Sorrento. Joan Plowright (pictured) is a nearby neighbor (Cinemax early Friday at 4:30 a.m.).
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 1992 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Now Playing in Palm Springs: The third annual Palm Springs Film Festival will get under way Wednesday with the North American premiere of "Enchanted April," a British film starring Miranda Richardson and Joan Plowright. Veteran actor James Stewart will be honored with an achievement award at a black-tie gala on Saturday, and the closing-night screenings Jan. 15 will be "Toto Le Heros" (Belgium) and "Kafka" (U.S.A.), starring Jeremy Irons.
NEWS
May 1, 1994 | SUSAN KING
Renowned British actress Joan Plowright has a lot in common with Dorothy Kilgore, the character she plays in the new "Hallmark Hall of Fame" drama "A Place for Annie." They're both strong-willed widows whose children have left the nest. And both seem to be warm, friendly and good-hearted. Plowright, who was married for nearly 30 years to legendary British actor Lord Laurence Olivier, has been working almost nonstop in features and TV movies since his death in 1989.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 1993 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Joan Plowright and Laurence Olivier met in the cast of "The Entertainer" at London's Royal Court Theatre in 1956. They re-created their roles in the film version released in 1960. (Far from Shakespeare, it may nevertheless be Olivier's finest screen performance.) They were married in Connecticut in 1961, while starring on Broadway, he in "Becket" and she in "A Taste of Honey," for which she won a Tony.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 1985 | From Reuters
Britain's National Theatre has postponed its revival of John Osborne's "The Entertainer" after he refused to lift his objection to actress Joan Plowright playing the female lead. The theater said it would replace the 1957 play with Bernard Shaw's "Mrs. Warren's Profession," scheduled to preview Oct. 4, and starring Plowright. The playwright said he had no personal animosity toward Plowright, the wife of Sir Laurence Olivier, but was offended at not being consulted.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 2003 | From Associated Press
Actress Joan Plowright, wife of the late Laurence Olivier, is being designated a British dame, the female equivalent of a knight, on the annual New Year's honors list announced by the Queen in London today. Guitarist Eric Clapton and the Kinks' Ray Davies are receiving royal honors, becoming commanders of the Order of the British Empire. The same award is going to "Billy Elliot" director Stephen Daldry and cartoonist Ronald Searle, 83. Meanwhile, the Sunday Times published a list of 300 well-known people -- including singer David Bowie, comedian John Cleese and actors Albert Finney and Kenneth Branagh -- who had declined honors since 1945.
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