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Joan Quigley

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March 25, 1990 | Sonja Bolle
Latest in the spate of books on the Reagan presidency is the memoir of the woman who determined most of the President's schedule and personal movements during his years in the White House: Nancy Reagan's astrologer. This is the woman to whom, according to former White House Chief of Staff Donald Regan, the country owes "a vote of gratitude"; considering her influence over the Reagans, he implied, we are fortunate that she was interested in "nothing but astrology."
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BOOKS
March 25, 1990 | Sonja Bolle
Latest in the spate of books on the Reagan presidency is the memoir of the woman who determined most of the President's schedule and personal movements during his years in the White House: Nancy Reagan's astrologer. This is the woman to whom, according to former White House Chief of Staff Donald Regan, the country owes "a vote of gratitude"; considering her influence over the Reagans, he implied, we are fortunate that she was interested in "nothing but astrology."
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NEWS
October 24, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Former White House Chief of Staff Donald T. Regan on Monday renewed his feud with Nancy Reagan. He said on television that the former First Lady "has no gratitude to anyone." "I think she takes too much pity on herself," Regan said in an interview on NBC's "Today" program in commenting on the contents of Mrs. Reagan's recently published book, "My Turn." "In yesterday's Los Angeles Times, they had a full spread on this book, and in it they showed 20 people, all of whom Nancy Reagan criticizes."
NEWS
March 18, 1990 | MARK A. STEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joan Quigley cuts a handsome figure as she nibbles on fruit salad in a restaurant at the stately Fairmont Hotel, but if anyone else recognizes her as the person who claims to have put the Teflon in the "Teflon Presidency," they are keeping it to themselves. The other diners are unaware of the celebrity in their midst, the woman who says she made the Great Communicator great and single-handedly made a lovable First Lady out of a Dragon Lady. Perhaps they have forgotten her.
NEWS
May 10, 1988 | NIKKI FINKE, Times Staff Writer
Joan Quigley knew it was going to be a trying week. She saw it in her stars. "I'm an Aries," the San Francisco socialite explains. "There's a major conjunction of Jupiter and Saturn, which is going to be terrible for many people. Accidents. Fires. Troubles. It's just a very difficult time."
NEWS
March 18, 1990 | MARK A. STEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joan Quigley cuts a handsome figure as she nibbles on fruit salad in a restaurant at the stately Fairmont Hotel, but if anyone else recognizes her as the person who claims to have put the Teflon in the "Teflon Presidency," they are keeping it to themselves. The other diners are unaware of the celebrity in their midst, the woman who says she made the Great Communicator great and single-handedly made a lovable First Lady out of a Dragon Lady. Perhaps they have forgotten her.
NEWS
May 9, 1988 | SARA FRITZ, Times Staff Writer
First Lady Nancy Reagan is portrayed in a forthcoming book by former White House Chief of Staff Donald T. Regan as a willful, conniving woman who cleverly manipulates the President and has so little regard for others that she heartlessly demanded CIA Director William J. Casey's resignation before he died of a brain tumor. As excerpted in Time magazine's May 16 issue published today, the book contains the most unflattering account of Mrs.
NEWS
May 11, 1988 | Associated Press
After saying Nancy Reagan had not talked with her astrologer in a couple of months, White House officials were caught off guard today when the stargazer said she had been in touch with the First Lady this week. "I just don't know anything about it," said Elaine Crispen, the press secretary to Mrs. Reagan. "I wasn't aware they had talked. I had no idea."
NEWS
March 14, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Joan Quigley, the astrologer whose advice to First Lady Nancy Reagan reportedly set the President's schedule, said she's finished with the Reagans. "When you're that friendly with someone and they just cut you off . . . it borders on the incredible," Quigley said in an interview in Fame magazine's April issue. The title of Quigley's new book, "What Does Joan Say?"
NEWS
October 24, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Former White House Chief of Staff Donald T. Regan on Monday renewed his feud with Nancy Reagan. He said on television that the former First Lady "has no gratitude to anyone." "I think she takes too much pity on herself," Regan said in an interview on NBC's "Today" program in commenting on the contents of Mrs. Reagan's recently published book, "My Turn." "In yesterday's Los Angeles Times, they had a full spread on this book, and in it they showed 20 people, all of whom Nancy Reagan criticizes."
NEWS
May 10, 1988 | NIKKI FINKE, Times Staff Writer
Joan Quigley knew it was going to be a trying week. She saw it in her stars. "I'm an Aries," the San Francisco socialite explains. "There's a major conjunction of Jupiter and Saturn, which is going to be terrible for many people. Accidents. Fires. Troubles. It's just a very difficult time."
NEWS
May 9, 1988 | SARA FRITZ, Times Staff Writer
First Lady Nancy Reagan is portrayed in a forthcoming book by former White House Chief of Staff Donald T. Regan as a willful, conniving woman who cleverly manipulates the President and has so little regard for others that she heartlessly demanded CIA Director William J. Casey's resignation before he died of a brain tumor. As excerpted in Time magazine's May 16 issue published today, the book contains the most unflattering account of Mrs.
NEWS
May 21, 1988 | Associated Press
White House spokesman Marlin Fitzwater on Friday ridiculed a published report that said the Administration is trying to determine if telephone calls between First Lady Nancy Reagan and her San Francisco astrologer may have been intercepted by Soviet spies. "If the Soviets wanted to monitor White House phone calls to get information on the President, there are thousands of calls a day from White House staff of more significance," Fitzwater said.
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