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Joan Snyder

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May 16, 1991 | JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joan Snyder is packing up 29 years' worth of memories at CBS News. Reporter's spiral notebooks, old photos (a dark-haired Snyder on assignment in a 1960s miniskirt), letters from viewers on stories that affected their lives--it all spills out of drawers into cardboard boxes in an oddly quiet corridor of offices at CBS' "Sunday Morning." "This whole place feels quiet," said Snyder, who has worked as a producer for "Sunday Morning" since 1987.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 1991 | JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joan Snyder is packing up 29 years' worth of memories at CBS News. Reporter's spiral notebooks, old photos (a dark-haired Snyder on assignment in a 1960s miniskirt), letters from viewers on stories that affected their lives--it all spills out of drawers into cardboard boxes in an oddly quiet corridor of offices at CBS' "Sunday Morning." "This whole place feels quiet," said Snyder, who has worked as a producer for "Sunday Morning" since 1987.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 1989 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Times Art Writer
It's tempting to say that two exhibitions, "Abstract Options" at the University Art Museum, UC Santa Barbara, and "Joan Snyder Collects Joan Snyder" at the Contemporary Arts Forum, jointly declare the revival of abstract painting. But the notion doesn't hold much water. For one thing, you need more than a temporary disappearance to have a revival. Abstraction didn't die when Neo-Expressionism arrived; it only surrendered the limelight and it has maintained a loyal following.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 1989 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Times Art Writer
It's tempting to say that two exhibitions, "Abstract Options" at the University Art Museum, UC Santa Barbara, and "Joan Snyder Collects Joan Snyder" at the Contemporary Arts Forum, jointly declare the revival of abstract painting. But the notion doesn't hold much water. For one thing, you need more than a temporary disappearance to have a revival. Abstraction didn't die when Neo-Expressionism arrived; it only surrendered the limelight and it has maintained a loyal following.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1997 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Every year, the Buenaventura Gallery mounts a juried competition, filling its walls with work by members of the hosting organization, the Buenaventura Art Assn. In a sense, the show is an extension of business as usual in the gallery, which normally showcases one artist in the back and a melange in the rest of the gallery. This year's show is a happy jumble, with highlights including Gerd Koch's dramatic "Soul of Egypt" and Carlisle Cooper's prismatic "Two Acrobats."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 1986 | KRISTINE McKENNA
Having relocated to an elegant new gallery and undergone a slight change of management, the former Simard Halm Gallery declares its intentions with "Painterly Abstraction: Eight New York Artists," a conservative inaugural exhibition. A catalogue essay by co-curators Will Halm and Charles Kessler informs us that abstraction has been in the shadow of figurative painting for the last decade but is about to return to the fore as the public has had its fill of Neo-Ex figurative imagery.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 1989 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC
Historic periods, issues and ideas, artists, collections. The usual suspects are lined up for a 1989 preview of art exhibitions. When you get down to particulars, however, this year's list has a distinct character, heavily influenced by celebrations of photography's 150th birthday and examinations of Latino art. Historic Periods: Museums across the country will note the fact that on Jan.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1990 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
The Santa Barbara Contemporary Arts Forum has a new home, and it's in a shopping mall. The city's premier showcase for contemporary art has only moved a half block, but the change is dramatic. No longer squirreled away behind a storefront on De la Guerra--as it has been since 1981--the forum now has a second-floor vantage point in Paseo Nuevo, a brand-new commercial development on State Street. Visitors will get their first look at the forum's snazzy new digs on Saturday, 5 to 8 p.m.
NEWS
June 7, 1987 | MARY ESCH, Associated Press
Ken Kleinpeter is an animal-welfare activist mainly concerned about baby bulls that eventually wind up on somebody's dinner plate, perhaps laced with Marsala, mushrooms and a touch of tarragon. He is not against eating veal, just the way the animals are treated before they are slaughtered. Until a few years ago, Kleinpeter, 33, was a guitar teacher and aspiring songwriter in New York City. But he grew up on a farm in Louisiana, milking cows by hand, and longed to return to the bucolic life.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 2007 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
A UC Riverside biologist who studies spider silk to make natural product-based materials such as biodegradable fishing lines and sutures is among the 24 winners of this year's MacArthur "genius" awards. A Caltech scientist trying to understand how interactions between proteins and genes control the activity of cells, and another who folds DNA into complex shapes that could eventually be used in electronic circuits were also among the six California scientists who received the awards.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 1997 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Looking at the Alice Neel show at the UC Santa Barbara Art Museum, the viewer can't help but get the impression that the artist was a people person, in the deepest sense. Born in 1900, Neel grew up with the century and had to realize that her interest in people wasn't always in sync with art-worldly fashion, as abstraction and conceptualism shifted attention away from the figure.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 1998 | Steve Appleford, Steve Appleford is an occasional contributor to Calendar
Even the revolution had its lighter moments. For documentary photographer Larry Fink, a committed '60s radical bent on exposing the ills of society through scenes of blunt tragicomedy, that meant less time in the streets and more time with the debutantes. More nights at fancy parties and the disco inferno of Studio 54. There were gallery soirees and backwoods baptisms captured in black-and-white images that revealed a strange empathy beneath the often harsh lights and shadows of Fink's flash.
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