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Joan Tower

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April 25, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
New York musician Joan Tower was named Tuesday as 1990 recipient of the $150,000 Grawemeyer Award for Original Music Composition by the University of Louisville. Tower, a 52-year-old music professor at Bard College in Annandale-on-Hudson, N.Y., is the first woman and native-born American chosen for the 6-year-old prize named for retired industrialist Charles Grawemeyer, the university said. Previous winners have been from Britain, Germany, Cambodia and Romania.
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January 18, 2003 | Chris Pasles, Times Staff Writer
The Tokyo String Quartet came to the Southland on Wednesday with a new first violinist and a new work. The first bit of news can cause undue concern. A quartet is a complicated ensemble that consists at different moments of various solos, duos and trios, as well as being a single group that may shift emphasis among its players. One misstep causes a tremor; a shift in personnel is an earthquake.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 1995
Joan Tower is a member of an exceptionally small number of female composers whose works get played--and played a lot--by major orchestras. Comparatively speaking, that is. The compositional world is still dominated by men, alive and dead. But Tower is helping to widen the field. Born in New Rochelle, N.Y., in 1938, Tower grew up in Bolivia, Chile and Peru, as her father, a geologist and mining engineer, worked for eight years in these countries.
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October 1, 2000 | JOHN HENKEN, John Henken is a regular contributor to Calendar
Contrary to some expectations, the media/technology explosion has not created cultural hegemony for any particular musical style. Music from just about any time and any place is available anywhere--anywhere, that is, with Internet access and CDs. And therein lies a rub: Diversity poses at least as many problems as monoculture for young composers. The more the choices, the tougher the decisions. "Composers need to find their own way," says Joan Tower.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2000 | JOHN HENKEN, John Henken is a regular contributor to Calendar
Contrary to some expectations, the media/technology explosion has not created cultural hegemony for any particular musical style. Music from just about any time and any place is available anywhere--anywhere, that is, with Internet access and CDs. And therein lies a rub: Diversity poses at least as many problems as monoculture for young composers. The more the choices, the tougher the decisions. "Composers need to find their own way," says Joan Tower.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2003 | Chris Pasles, Times Staff Writer
The Tokyo String Quartet came to the Southland on Wednesday with a new first violinist and a new work. The first bit of news can cause undue concern. A quartet is a complicated ensemble that consists at different moments of various solos, duos and trios, as well as being a single group that may shift emphasis among its players. One misstep causes a tremor; a shift in personnel is an earthquake.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 1997 | John Henken
The common heritage of these striking pieces is quite apparent in their shapes and dimensions and in their remarkable combinations of orchestral color and solo verve. Yet so is the distinctive character of each--the intense Violin Concerto, lyrical Flute Concerto, dramatic Piano Concerto and mysterious Clarinet Concerto.
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November 2, 1988 | JOHN VOLAND, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
New York composer Christopher Rouse has taken the top honors in the 11th annual Kennedy Center Friedheim Awards, winning $5,000 for his Symphony No. 1, commissioned for the Baltimore Symphony orchestra and first performed in Baltimore last January. Ninety-six orchestral works had been submitted for the 1988 competition; a three-member jury made its final rankings on the four entries after hearing them in performance.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 1993
The opening concert of the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra's 1993-94 season features the world premiere of John Harbison's "Gli accordi piu usati/The most often used chords," Oct. 22 at Royce Hall and Oct. 23-24 at Ambassador Auditorium. Repertory for the 25th-anniversary season also includes world premieres from Joan Tower and Stephen Scott, and the U.S. premiere of Arvo Part's "Introductory Prayers."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 1997 | John Henken
The common heritage of these striking pieces is quite apparent in their shapes and dimensions and in their remarkable combinations of orchestral color and solo verve. Yet so is the distinctive character of each--the intense Violin Concerto, lyrical Flute Concerto, dramatic Piano Concerto and mysterious Clarinet Concerto.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 1995
Joan Tower is a member of an exceptionally small number of female composers whose works get played--and played a lot--by major orchestras. Comparatively speaking, that is. The compositional world is still dominated by men, alive and dead. But Tower is helping to widen the field. Born in New Rochelle, N.Y., in 1938, Tower grew up in Bolivia, Chile and Peru, as her father, a geologist and mining engineer, worked for eight years in these countries.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
New York musician Joan Tower was named Tuesday as 1990 recipient of the $150,000 Grawemeyer Award for Original Music Composition by the University of Louisville. Tower, a 52-year-old music professor at Bard College in Annandale-on-Hudson, N.Y., is the first woman and native-born American chosen for the 6-year-old prize named for retired industrialist Charles Grawemeyer, the university said. Previous winners have been from Britain, Germany, Cambodia and Romania.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 2000 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES MUSIC WRITER
Dramatic and brilliant writing combined with intense performances created a remarkably heated atmosphere at the first concert of the season by the Thornton Contemporary Music Ensemble in bright, welcoming Alfred Newman Recital Hall at USC, Tuesday night.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 1996 | SUSAN BLISS
Although only one of the works on the program was written in the 19th century, Romantic ethos flourished at the Terrace Theater on Saturday. Music Director JoAnn Falletta led the Long Beach Symphony in works, by Kodaly, Joan Tower and Tchaikovsky, that explore emotion-filled effect, and require split-second mood shifts and virtuosic command.
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