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Joan Weiss

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A judge has set today as the deadline for the house occupied by industrialist Armand Hammer at the time of his death to be turned over to the Los Angeles woman who inherited it when Hammer's wife, Frances, died last year. The transaction is occurring only after a confrontation over the attempted removal of belongings from Hammer's luxury Westwood home Dec. 10, hours after he died. Bitter controversy, which seemed to surround Hammer in the last years of his life, has followed him in death.
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BUSINESS
August 3, 1994 | PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a surprisingly swift resolution to a bitter and prolonged family legal dispute over oil millions and valuable artworks, a Los Angeles County Superior Court judge Tuesday threw out a $400-million claim by the niece of Armand Hammer's late wife that sought half the late oil tycoon's estate, including art now housed in the UCLA-managed museum that bears his name.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 1991 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Less than two months after the death of Armand Hammer and less than two weeks after the closing of the first exhibition at the Armand Hammer Museum of Art and Cultural Center in Westwood, the museum is mired in uncertainty--over its direction and even its next show. The late chief executive of Occidental Petroleum Corp. planned the museum that bears his name as a monument to himself, a home for his art collection and a glitzy cultural attraction. The museum opened Nov.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1994 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
The UCLA/Armand Hammer Museum of Art and Cultural Center plans to sell one of its most valuable assets, an illustrated scientific manuscript by Italian Renaissance master Leonardo da Vinci. Surpassed in value only by the art museum's "Hospital at St.-Remy" by Vincent van Gogh, the Leonardo notebook is expected to sell for as much as $10 million, according Christie's, the New York auction house that will sell it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1994 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
The UCLA/Armand Hammer Museum of Art and Cultural Center plans to sell one of its most valuable assets, an illustrated scientific manuscript by Italian Renaissance master Leonardo da Vinci. Surpassed in value only by the art museum's "Hospital at St.-Remy" by Vincent van Gogh, the Leonardo notebook is expected to sell for as much as $10 million, according Christie's, the New York auction house that will sell it.
BUSINESS
August 3, 1994 | PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a surprisingly swift resolution to a bitter and prolonged family legal dispute over oil millions and valuable artworks, a Los Angeles County Superior Court judge Tuesday threw out a $400-million claim by the niece of Armand Hammer's late wife that sought half the late oil tycoon's estate, including art now housed in the UCLA-managed museum that bears his name.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 1991 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The late industrialist Armand Hammer engaged in a longtime extramarital affair with the woman who is now chief fund-raiser at the Westwood museum that bears his name, according to newly filed documents in a bitter lawsuit over legal title to Hammer's art collection. In 1974, the court documents state, Hammer even had the woman named curator of art of Occidental Petroleum Corp., which Hammer headed from 1957 until his death at the age of 92 last Dec.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 1998 | LIZ SEYMOUR
Joan Weiss Hollenbeck, a writer and community college educator, died of acute leukemia at her Laguna Beach home Saturday. She was 69. She taught English, creative writing and other subjects at Coastline Community College, Saddleback College and Irvine Valley College. She also is the author of eight books, including five for children. Hollenbeck graduated from Cal Poly Pomona and Cal State L.A.
BOOKS
November 15, 1992
Many thanks for giving Germaine Greer's "The Change" (Oct. 18) front-page status. As instructor of "Women's Writings--a World Perspective" for an Orange County Community College, I've had more difficulty finding books by older women than by black, Hispanic, Asian and Arabic women combined. Now please give top billing to the Betty Friedan book on aging which will be published soon. Hers is a valued voice among women as well. Women over 50 refuse to become invisible, as our mothers did. JOAN TALMAGE WEISS, LAGUNA BEACH
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1994
Oilman Armand Hammer's wife was coerced into leaving her niece hundreds of millions of dollars in communal property in a rewritten will, a judge has ruled. Superior Court Judge Henry W. Shatford ruled that the bequest to Joan Weiss "was the product of threats, pressure and coercion and would not be enforced by the court," said Daniel Petrocelli, a lawyer for Hammer's estate and the Armand Hammer Foundation. The order, announced Tuesday, was signed Dec. 6.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 1991 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Less than two months after the death of Armand Hammer and less than two weeks after the closing of the first exhibition at the Armand Hammer Museum of Art and Cultural Center in Westwood, the museum is mired in uncertainty--over its direction and even its next show. The late chief executive of Occidental Petroleum Corp. planned the museum that bears his name as a monument to himself, a home for his art collection and a glitzy cultural attraction. The museum opened Nov.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 1991 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The late industrialist Armand Hammer engaged in a longtime extramarital affair with the woman who is now chief fund-raiser at the Westwood museum that bears his name, according to newly filed documents in a bitter lawsuit over legal title to Hammer's art collection. In 1974, the court documents state, Hammer even had the woman named curator of art of Occidental Petroleum Corp., which Hammer headed from 1957 until his death at the age of 92 last Dec.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A judge has set today as the deadline for the house occupied by industrialist Armand Hammer at the time of his death to be turned over to the Los Angeles woman who inherited it when Hammer's wife, Frances, died last year. The transaction is occurring only after a confrontation over the attempted removal of belongings from Hammer's luxury Westwood home Dec. 10, hours after he died. Bitter controversy, which seemed to surround Hammer in the last years of his life, has followed him in death.
OPINION
December 29, 1996
The death of Carl Sagan is the loss of a national treasure (Dec. 21). Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS) cuts across all socioeconomic levels. Hundreds of us are transfusion-dependent, consider bone marrow biopsy and live with chronic fatigue. We ask that more federal money be allotted for research into the treatment and management of MDS. Most of us go to a hema- tologist/oncologist who tells us, "We just don't know much about this disease." The rarity of MDS should not diminish its importance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1994
We simply won't accept the B+ rating on the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station ("NRC Gives San Onofre an A-/B+ Rating," Aug 9). We want an immediate investigation to determine how Southern California Edison can bring its plant up to an A rating. We can't remedy fires and earthquakes, but surely we can take action on this potential threat to our safety. JOAN WEISS HOLLENBECK Laguna Beach Re: "Early San Onofre Closure Endorsed," (July 8): Laguna Beach, on a 3-2 vote by the council, has endorsed the early closure of the San Onofre nuclear plant.
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