Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJoanie Sommers
IN THE NEWS

Joanie Sommers

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 1986 | ZAN STEWART
Joanie Sommers would be the first to admit that her on-again, off-again singing career hasn't been all smooth sailing. "It's been a long struggle," the perky, still-squeaky-clean-voiced songstress said, "but I'm getting there. It's just taken me a while." Sommers, who had a pop hit with "Johnny Get Angry" in 1963, is singing pretty much full-time now, and she couldn't be happier. "I've worked more in the last two years than I had in the previous 15 years," she said, "and I love it.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 2001
Jazz and pop vocalist Joanie Sommers will mark the CD reissues of her four Warner Bros. albums of the 1960s by resuming her career with an engagement at the Hollywood Roosevelt Cinegrill Aug. 14-18. She will be accompanied nightly at 8 p.m. by a jazz trio led by pianist Ed Vodicka, with Jim Hughart on bass and Mark Stevens on drums. Sommers' show will be recorded live for a new album. The Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel is at 7000 Hollywood Blvd. For more information, call (323) 466-7000.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 1992 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Joanie get angry? Not a chance. Ask singer Joanie Sommers about k.d. lang'srecent, satiric cover of Sommers' 1962 hit "Johnny Get Angry," and she'll tell you it's wonderful. "I'd love to meet her someday," the youthfully voiced Sommers said recently in a phone interview from her Los Angeles home. "She's definitely doing it differently." Before she scored a Top 10 pop hit in 1962 with "Johnny Get Angry," Sommers was singing jazz. Her first album for Warner Bros.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 1993 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Joanie Sommers turned back the clock when she performed Saturday at Maxwell's last weekend of jazz. The singer, who defined an entire generation with her vivacious delivery of "For Those Who Think Young" on behalf of Pepsi-Cola, was here to apply her trademark exuberance to the old standards. It was as if time had been suspended.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 2001
Jazz and pop vocalist Joanie Sommers will mark the CD reissues of her four Warner Bros. albums of the 1960s by resuming her career with an engagement at the Hollywood Roosevelt Cinegrill Aug. 14-18. She will be accompanied nightly at 8 p.m. by a jazz trio led by pianist Ed Vodicka, with Jim Hughart on bass and Mark Stevens on drums. Sommers' show will be recorded live for a new album. The Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel is at 7000 Hollywood Blvd. For more information, call (323) 466-7000.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 1988 | LEONARD FEATHER
Joanie Sommers has been a perennial presence on the Southland scene since the 1960s, and an occasional visitor for several years to the Vine St. Bar & Grill, where she opened Thursday and closes tonight. Some of her early successes were scored in the lucrative world of jingles, as she reminded us in a medley--composed mainly of plugs for Pepsi-Cola--placed somewhat irrelevantly near the end of her performance.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 1992 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Joanie Sommers is one of those artists who has such a good time on stage, you can't help but join in the fun and bask in her glow. Making her first Orange County appearance in several years Friday at Maxwell's, Sommers displayed her natural affection for music and performing in putting on a seven-tune opening set that had a number of exhilarating, and moving, moments.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 1993 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Joanie Sommers turned back the clock when she performed Saturday at Maxwell's last weekend of jazz. The singer, who defined an entire generation with her vivacious delivery of "For Those Who Think Young" on behalf of Pepsi-Cola, was here to apply her trademark exuberance to the old standards. It was as if time had been suspended.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 2000
Nearly two dozen top Southland jazz musicians will come together on Friday to play at a memorial service for pianist Joe Massimino, who died May 24 of complications from stomach cancer. Singers Julius LaRosa, Stephanie Haynes, Dewey Ernie, Micki Rhyne and Joanie Sommers; pianists Tom Ranier and Mark Massey, bassists Luther Hughes and Jack Prather, drummers Paul Kreibich and Dave Tull and guitarist Ron Eschete are among Massimino's friends and collaborators scheduled to play at the 10 a.m.
NEWS
June 8, 1995 | TODD EVERETT
Bruce Belland's first radio appearance was at the age of 4. His father was a radio preacher in Chicago "and would reward me with a stick of gum if I sang 'God Bless America.' " During the '50s, Belland and his singing group, the Four Preps, were a popular recording act, with hits including "26 Miles" and "Big Man." They also appeared frequently on the popular "Ozzie and Harriet" TV show as friends of (and occasional backup singers for) Rick Nelson. On Sunday at 3 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 1992 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Joanie Sommers is one of those artists who has such a good time on stage, you can't help but join in the fun and bask in her glow. Making her first Orange County appearance in several years Friday at Maxwell's, Sommers displayed her natural affection for music and performing in putting on a seven-tune opening set that had a number of exhilarating, and moving, moments.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 1992 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Joanie get angry? Not a chance. Ask singer Joanie Sommers about k.d. lang'srecent, satiric cover of Sommers' 1962 hit "Johnny Get Angry," and she'll tell you it's wonderful. "I'd love to meet her someday," the youthfully voiced Sommers said recently in a phone interview from her Los Angeles home. "She's definitely doing it differently." Before she scored a Top 10 pop hit in 1962 with "Johnny Get Angry," Sommers was singing jazz. Her first album for Warner Bros.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 1988 | LEONARD FEATHER
Joanie Sommers has been a perennial presence on the Southland scene since the 1960s, and an occasional visitor for several years to the Vine St. Bar & Grill, where she opened Thursday and closes tonight. Some of her early successes were scored in the lucrative world of jingles, as she reminded us in a medley--composed mainly of plugs for Pepsi-Cola--placed somewhat irrelevantly near the end of her performance.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 1986 | ZAN STEWART
Joanie Sommers would be the first to admit that her on-again, off-again singing career hasn't been all smooth sailing. "It's been a long struggle," the perky, still-squeaky-clean-voiced songstress said, "but I'm getting there. It's just taken me a while." Sommers, who had a pop hit with "Johnny Get Angry" in 1963, is singing pretty much full-time now, and she couldn't be happier. "I've worked more in the last two years than I had in the previous 15 years," she said, "and I love it.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 1999 | DON HECKMAN
The concert celebrating Frankie Laine's 86th birthday on Sunday was a tribute to a veteran pop artist who until very recently has sustained an active singing career. But Laine's participation in the event at the Hollywood Park Casino was minimal. Plagued for months by what he described as a sore throat, he managed to sing only a couple of tunes: "On the Sunny Side of the Street" and "Your Cheatin' Heart."
NEWS
June 12, 1994 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Continueing to mine memorable comedic moments in TV and film for its Home Video Comedy Classics, MCA/Universal has added The Jack Benny Program and Francis the Talking Mule to its collection. Each video in the Jack Benny set (six videos at $15 apiece) contains two episodes of his acclaimed TV series, which aired on CBS from 1950 to 1964.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|