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Joann Falletta

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2000 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
Eleven seasons ago, JoAnn Falletta, a young woman eager to make a name for herself in a then man's world, brought her ambitions to an orchestra--broke and dispirited--that desperately needed them. Saturday night she bid farewell as music director of the Long Beach Symphony in a program of orchestral showpieces impressively played and before an adoring audience that filled Terrace Theater. Falletta moves up the ladder; she became music director of the Buffalo Philharmonic in the fall.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 2009 | MARK SWED, MUSIC CRITIC
Saturday night the Long Beach Symphony celebrated the beginning of its 75th season. The mayor, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors and the state Assembly and Senate sent proclamations. Champagne and cake were served in the Terrace Theater Lobby. Beethoven's Ninth Symphony was served on stage. Although impressive, the anniversary is slightly deceiving in that the orchestra, which began as a volunteer "recreational ensemble" in 1935 with four concerts a year, did not turn fully professional until 1966 when it began presenting 23 concerts a season.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 1990 | TIMOTHY MANGAN
JoAnn Falletta, music director of the Long Beach Symphony, may be diminutive in stature, but she's a commanding presence on the podium. Saturday night she led her orchestra in a 20th-Century program of Soviet and American music before a sold-out audience at the Terrace Theater. Most impressive was her dramatic and expansive reading of the Symphony No. 5 by Prokofiev, which concluded the program.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 2003 | Donna Perlmutter, Special to The Times
No one is exactly telling JoAnn Falletta, "You've come a long way, baby," as the high-achieving conductor readies for her Hollywood Bowl debut with the Los Angeles Philharmonic on Tuesday and Thursday. In fact, the woman conductor who blazed the trail at the Bowl was Antonia Brico. In 1975, at age 73, she stood on the podium, skirt swaying in the breeze, and gave the downbeat, thereby reaching the apex of her career.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 1989 | DANIEL CARIAGA
In daily Calendar this week, interviews with three other new music directors: Glendale Symphony's Lalo Schifrin, San Diego Symphony's Yoav Talmi and Stewart Robertson at the Inland Empire . "The world of the symphony orchestra has changed," says JoAnn Falletta, incoming music director of the Long Beach Symphony. "Everything is different now, and there is no safe or certain way into the future. We have to figure it out as we go."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 1990 | KENNETH HERMAN
If the conductor's podium is the last "male stronghold" in the realm of music, JoAnn Falletta is storming that privileged bastion single-handedly. Recently appointed as music director of the Long Beach Symphony, Falletta now directs four orchestras and is music adviser to a fifth. "It's an unusual year to do so much," she explained from her hotel room in Tampa, Fla., where she is guest conducting.
NEWS
September 30, 1990 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three years ago, when the Long Beach Symphony's directors failed to renew conductor Murry Sidlin's contract, there was talk of football in the Terrace Theatre. "I see the music director as the quarterback," board president George M. Murchison said, "and we want to improve the team's record. I want to see a better passer in there." Sidlin was livid. He said comparing music to sports is inappropriate and offensive.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 1990 | GRETA BEIGEL
More than 50 years ago, in Europe and the United States, Dutch-born Antonia Brico dared to tread where no woman had ventured before: the field of symphonic conducting. In the late 1950s, pioneer Sarah Caldwell formed the Opera Company of Boston and Margaret Hillis the Chicago Symphony Chorus as one way to sneak into orchestral conducting.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 1998 | JOHN HENKEN
This self-produced recording documents the robust musical health of the orchestral establishment in Long Beach. Recorded last summer to celebrate the opening of the Aquarium of the Pacific, it rounds up the usual European liquid suspects, plus Frank Bridge's substantial Edwardian suite "The Sea."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 1994 | DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Women working with women may be common in many fields, but it's still pretty rare in the world of music, at least at the top. But, slowly, even that is changing.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2001 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
After 11 years as music director of the Long Beach Symphony and this season as its music advisor, JoAnn Falletta said goodbye to the orchestra, and it to her, with Mahler's Second Symphony Saturday night at the Terrace Theater. Was the choice of symphony symbolic? It confronts its listener immediately with the heroic struggle of death, then looks back on life with a nostalgia that is shot through with startling interruptions of psychic suffering.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2001 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES MUSIC WRITER
Closing the concert season in which her successor was picked, former Long Beach Symphony Music Director JoAnn Falletta is returning this month and next to lead the orchestra in its final programs of the year. The last one will be June 16, when Falletta conducts Mahler's Second Symphony. The first took place Saturday night in Terrace Theater at the Long Beach Performing Arts Center, when she presided over a program of works by Barber, Brahms and Bartok.
NEWS
October 23, 2000 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES MUSIC WRITER
The Long Beach Symphony's "Year of the Search" began well Saturday night at the Long Beach Performing Arts Center when Alasdair Neale, first of five candidates for the orchestra's post of music director, ascended the podium. If the next four achieve the brilliant results that Neale did, in a demanding test-program of works by Berlioz, Mendelssohn and Prokofiev, this 66th orchestral season will be a fascinating race to follow. The British-born Neale, who has been associate conductor at the San Francisco Symphony for eight years, impressed through his calm, his confidence and the compelling intelligence of his choices.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2000 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
Eleven seasons ago, JoAnn Falletta, a young woman eager to make a name for herself in a then man's world, brought her ambitions to an orchestra--broke and dispirited--that desperately needed them. Saturday night she bid farewell as music director of the Long Beach Symphony in a program of orchestral showpieces impressively played and before an adoring audience that filled Terrace Theater. Falletta moves up the ladder; she became music director of the Buffalo Philharmonic in the fall.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2000 | JOHN HENKEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When JoAnn Falletta came to the Long Beach Symphony as music director in 1989, the orchestra was taking its first steps after a near-death experience with bankruptcy. Its artistic and community outreach accounts also seemed nearly tapped out, and the organization was better known as a poster child of the late '80s failed-orchestra era than as a viable, exciting musical entity.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 1999 | JOHN HENKEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It was the last concert of the season for the Long Beach Symphony, and music director JoAnn Falletta seemed loath to let her audience leave for the summer with any heartstrings untugged, any sentiments unstirred. She matched the effusions of Korngold's Violin Concerto--and the West Coast debut of the lyrically inclined soloist Miranda Cuckson--with Bruckner's heady "Romantic" Symphony on Saturday evening at Terrace Theater, and left us exhilarated and exhausted in almost equal measure.
NEWS
October 4, 1990 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three years ago, when the Long Beach Symphony's directors failed to renew conductor Murry Sidlin's contract, there was talk of football in the Terrace Theatre. "I see the music director as the quarterback," board President George M. Murchison said, "and we want to improve the team's record. I want to see a better passer in there." Sidlin was livid. He said comparing music to sports is inappropriate and offensive.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 1999 | KRISTIN HOHENADEL, Kristin Hohenadel writes on culture and the arts
JoAnn Falletta stands onstage at the Terrace Theater in Long Beach with a hand-held mike, the navy sequined cuffs of her suit jacket glinting in the house lights. In a voice subtly shaded with her New York roots, the petite, 45-year-old conductor warms up the crowded theater with a little musical gossip about Prokofiev, Brahms and Korean American composer Byong-kon Kim, featured acts in the evening's program.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 1998 | JOHN HENKEN
This self-produced recording documents the robust musical health of the orchestral establishment in Long Beach. Recorded last summer to celebrate the opening of the Aquarium of the Pacific, it rounds up the usual European liquid suspects, plus Frank Bridge's substantial Edwardian suite "The Sea."
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