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Joann Jansen

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February 22, 2004 | Janet Kinosian
"Dirty Dancing: Havana Nights" is a story woven from choreographer JoAnn Jansen's life: the tale of an American teenager's year in Havana on the cusp of Castro's revolution. For this follow-up to 1987's "Dirty Dancing," Jansen -- whose work includes "Pirates of the Caribbean," "Along Came Polly" and the coming "Shall We Dance," with Jennifer Lopez and Richard Gere -- conducted a 10-week dance boot camp for "Havana" stars Romola Garai ("I Capture the Castle") and Diego Luna ("Y Tu Mama Tambien")
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2004 | Janet Kinosian
"Dirty Dancing: Havana Nights" is a story woven from choreographer JoAnn Jansen's life: the tale of an American teenager's year in Havana on the cusp of Castro's revolution. For this follow-up to 1987's "Dirty Dancing," Jansen -- whose work includes "Pirates of the Caribbean," "Along Came Polly" and the coming "Shall We Dance," with Jennifer Lopez and Richard Gere -- conducted a 10-week dance boot camp for "Havana" stars Romola Garai ("I Capture the Castle") and Diego Luna ("Y Tu Mama Tambien")
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2004 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
"Dirty Dancing: Havana Nights" is sufficiently original and engaging to be called merely "Havana Nights" but will no doubt get a boost by the reference to the popular 1987 "Dirty Dancing" even though it is actually drawn from the personal experiences of its co-producer-choreographer JoAnn Jansen.
NEWS
July 22, 2004 | Susan King
Starsky & Hutch Ben Stiller, Owen Wilson Warner Home Video, $28 The ABC buddy detective series from the 1970s wasn't a very good show, but what it had going for it was the undeniable charm, chemistry and tight-fitting bluejeans of its two hunky stars, David Soul and Paul Michael Glaser. The two show up in cameos in this unmemorable but fittingly funny film, which stars Ben Stiller as Starsky and Owen Wilson as Hutch.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2006 | Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune
The latest ballroom dance-fever picture isn't very good, but some of the dancing is fun. There. The review is finished. You may now resume your merengue lesson. A kind of "Mild Lukewarm Ballroom" to bookend the recent "Mad Hot Ballroom," "Take the Lead" springs from the real-life tale of how ballroom champ Pierre Dulaine brought some new/old moves to kids in the New York City public schools. The film stars Antonio Banderas as a Hollywood version of Dulaine.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2003 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
There is something unnerving about watching Brittany Murphy portray a kooky, klutzy daughter of a deceased rock legend in "Uptown Girls." Director Boaz Yakin has her constantly going over the top and flailing about in all directions in a misguided attempt at madcap comedy. Murphy, who looks like she could use a good rest, strives mightily to accommodate him but ends up seeming merely strained when she's supposed to come across as irresistibly charming despite her character's erratic ways.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 1989 | DONNA PERLMUTTER
A kinder and gentler world is hardly the one Joann Fregalette Jansen tries to depict with her New York-based dance company, which appeared Thursday at CalArts. Rather, she shows the disorganizational aftermath of a faulty system. But what, exactly, has gone wrong? Can we assume that the choreographer's brand of stage autism is a manifestation of neurobiological disturbance? Or a withdrawal response to the horrors of everyday human experience?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2006 | Lewis Segal, Times Staff Writer
"WHY do you want to dance?" ballerina Moira Shearer is asked early in "The Red Shoes." "Why do you want to live?" she replies, and the exchange typifies the momentous significance that films have given to the art. In the movies, lives change on the dance floor.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2001 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Charitably, you could approximate the "Romeo and Juliet" at the Ahmanson to what Lord Capulet calls that lovesick kid, Romeo: "virtuous and well-governed." Sir Peter Hall's production is stolid, dogged, 2 1/2-star Shakespeare. Even with a deeply variable cast, the end result carries a kind of bland serenity, all that lovely sonneteering gliding by without much in the way of theatrical excitement. It is not overwhelming and it is not underwhelming. You leave the production feeling merely whelmed.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 1999 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Peter Hall, the former leader of both England's Royal Shakespeare Company and the National Theatre, said it in 1988: "I would like to run a Shakespeare studio, training actors in the form and what to look for. And I would like to do productions arising out of that." e The dream preceded that particular interview. And has endured beyond it.
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