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Joann Sfar

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September 1, 2011 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
While growing up in Nice, France, in the 1970s and '80s, Joann Sfar was obsessed with singer-songwriter Serge Gainsbourg. So much so that Sfar eventually penned and illustrated a 451-page adult comic book about the racy, boundary-pushing musician. "He was the only French singer with an attitude," Sfar, 40, said by phone from New York recently. "When you turn on TV in France in the 1970s, he was the only guy who would refer to sex and alcohol and the meaningless life, so it was very appealing.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2013 | By Sheri Linden
The title character of "The Rabbi's Cat" is not your everyday cartoon fluffball. He's scrawny, apparently hairless and unapologetically disputatious. The animated world he inhabits is no kid-friendly adventure but a philosophical quarrel in the form of a frenetic road trip through 1930s Africa. Based on several volumes of the graphic novel series by Joann Sfar, the hand-drawn film is directed by Sfar and Antoine Delesvaux, who use a rich palette and a mix of visual styles ranging from blunt to dazzling.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 2011 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Unconventional, imaginative, nothing if not audacious, "Gainsbourg: A Heroic Life" is a portrait of creativity from the inside, a serious yet playful attempt to find an artistic way to tell an emotional truth. "Heroic" may seem like an odd word to attach to a man like the legendary songwriter and provocateur Serge Gainsbourg, a giant of 20th century French popular music but also a man to whom creating outrage and scandal was second nature. Best known in this country for "Je T'Aime ... Moi Non Plus," the racy duet he recorded with British actress Jane Birkin (actress Charlotte Gainsbourg is their daughter)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2013
FRIDAY 56 Up The latest installment of a decades-long documentary series chronicling the lives of 14 people from all over England who have participated in interviews every seven years since 1964. Directed by Michael Apted and Paul Almond. First Run Features Brief Reunion A successful entrepreneur has his comfortable life in rural New England turned upside down by the unexpected appearance of a former classmate. With Joel de la Fuente, Alexie Gilmore and Scott Shepherd.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2010 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
The Little Prince A Graphic Novel adapted from the book by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry Joann Sfar Houghton Mifflin Harcourt: 110 pp., $19.99 "The Little Prince" has long been beloved for its bittersweet pairing of a lost man and a searching youth. In the 67-year-old classic written by French aviator and author Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, a little blond boy leaves his home on Asteroid B-612 and lands in the middle of the Sahara desert, where he meets a stranded pilot desperate to fix his plane.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2013 | By Sheri Linden
The title character of "The Rabbi's Cat" is not your everyday cartoon fluffball. He's scrawny, apparently hairless and unapologetically disputatious. The animated world he inhabits is no kid-friendly adventure but a philosophical quarrel in the form of a frenetic road trip through 1930s Africa. Based on several volumes of the graphic novel series by Joann Sfar, the hand-drawn film is directed by Sfar and Antoine Delesvaux, who use a rich palette and a mix of visual styles ranging from blunt to dazzling.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2010 | By Sonja Bolle, Special to the Los Angeles Times
In young-adult fiction, look for the fall to squeeze every last drop of — excuse the expression — blood out of the vampire and supernatural creature trend. We've seen werewolves, ghosts, warrior fairies, zombies … where can we go next? Well, into younger age groups, for one. With her new novel "Radiance" (Square Fish/Feiwel and Friends, ages 9-12), for example, Alyson Noël spins off a new series about the ghostly younger sister from her "Immortals" books for ages 12 and older.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2010 | By Sonja Bolle, Special to the Los Angeles Times
I am a latecomer to graphic novels. Years ago, my truly literary friends tried to turn me on to the groundbreaking art of the "Sandman" books (Neil Gaiman and various artists) and "Love and Rockets" (Los Bros. Hernandez). I admit I felt about those books the way I feel about great horror movies: I could admire the art, but they did not make my heart sing. When I was editor of the Los Angeles Times Book Review in the 1990s, I tried without success to get one or another of those literary friends to commit their intriguing ideas about the emerging world of graphic novels to a piece for the Book Review, but they were apparently keeping their enthusiasms to themselves and their aficionados.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2013
FRIDAY 56 Up The latest installment of a decades-long documentary series chronicling the lives of 14 people from all over England who have participated in interviews every seven years since 1964. Directed by Michael Apted and Paul Almond. First Run Features Brief Reunion A successful entrepreneur has his comfortable life in rural New England turned upside down by the unexpected appearance of a former classmate. With Joel de la Fuente, Alexie Gilmore and Scott Shepherd.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2010
The 14th Dalai Lama A Manga Biography Tetsu Saiwai Penguin, $15 paper A graphic biography of the leader of the Tibetan government-in-exile and Nobel Peace Prize laureate. The Alchemist A Graphic Novel Paulo Coelho, illustrated by Daniel Sampere HarperOne, $22.99 A visual reinterpretation of the magical tale of Spanish shepherd boy Santiago's journey in search of a treasure buried in the Egyptian pyramids.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 2011 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Unconventional, imaginative, nothing if not audacious, "Gainsbourg: A Heroic Life" is a portrait of creativity from the inside, a serious yet playful attempt to find an artistic way to tell an emotional truth. "Heroic" may seem like an odd word to attach to a man like the legendary songwriter and provocateur Serge Gainsbourg, a giant of 20th century French popular music but also a man to whom creating outrage and scandal was second nature. Best known in this country for "Je T'Aime ... Moi Non Plus," the racy duet he recorded with British actress Jane Birkin (actress Charlotte Gainsbourg is their daughter)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 2011 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
While growing up in Nice, France, in the 1970s and '80s, Joann Sfar was obsessed with singer-songwriter Serge Gainsbourg. So much so that Sfar eventually penned and illustrated a 451-page adult comic book about the racy, boundary-pushing musician. "He was the only French singer with an attitude," Sfar, 40, said by phone from New York recently. "When you turn on TV in France in the 1970s, he was the only guy who would refer to sex and alcohol and the meaningless life, so it was very appealing.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2010 | By Sonja Bolle, Special to the Los Angeles Times
I am a latecomer to graphic novels. Years ago, my truly literary friends tried to turn me on to the groundbreaking art of the "Sandman" books (Neil Gaiman and various artists) and "Love and Rockets" (Los Bros. Hernandez). I admit I felt about those books the way I feel about great horror movies: I could admire the art, but they did not make my heart sing. When I was editor of the Los Angeles Times Book Review in the 1990s, I tried without success to get one or another of those literary friends to commit their intriguing ideas about the emerging world of graphic novels to a piece for the Book Review, but they were apparently keeping their enthusiasms to themselves and their aficionados.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2010 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
The Little Prince A Graphic Novel adapted from the book by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry Joann Sfar Houghton Mifflin Harcourt: 110 pp., $19.99 "The Little Prince" has long been beloved for its bittersweet pairing of a lost man and a searching youth. In the 67-year-old classic written by French aviator and author Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, a little blond boy leaves his home on Asteroid B-612 and lands in the middle of the Sahara desert, where he meets a stranded pilot desperate to fix his plane.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2010 | By Sonja Bolle, Special to the Los Angeles Times
In young-adult fiction, look for the fall to squeeze every last drop of — excuse the expression — blood out of the vampire and supernatural creature trend. We've seen werewolves, ghosts, warrior fairies, zombies … where can we go next? Well, into younger age groups, for one. With her new novel "Radiance" (Square Fish/Feiwel and Friends, ages 9-12), for example, Alyson Noël spins off a new series about the ghostly younger sister from her "Immortals" books for ages 12 and older.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2010 | By Susan King
When the City of Lights, City of Angels French film festival began 13 years ago, about 2,000 Francophiles flocked to see the latest in Gallic cinema. The festival has grown since then -- last year saw 15,000 attendees -- and this year, its 14th, the programming promises to be among the most eclectic it has ever seen. "You have art-house style films but also very popular, very entertaining films.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2009 | By Jon Scieszka
As our first national ambassador of young people's literature, I am pleased to report that the world of children's books is rocking. My job for the last two years has been to raise national awareness of the importance of kids' books and to promote the full variety of great children's literature. My fellow authors and illustrators have made that job as easy as falling off a log while wearing a fancy sash. By my official ambassadorial estimate (and yes, I do also have tassels on my sash and those little triangle-shaped flags on my car)
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