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Joanne Brackeen

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 1994 | LEONARD REED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The spare New York loft of JoAnne Brackeen is dominated by two grand pianos, facing and tucked into each other, the melding of curves a happy if formidable yin/yang. But nearby, on her wood writing desk, is the image that telegraphs so much more: a photo of Brackeen at the keyboard, characteristically bent forward while summoning canyon-like walls of chords, with a strange fuzzy cloud of light hovering over her. Is it a defect in the print emulsion? An eerie accident of flash lighting?
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2002 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A few years ago, pianist Herbie Hancock and saxophonist Wayne Shorter stepped into a demanding genre of improvisation, performing spontaneously as a duo, with no preset tunes or arrangements. Despite the abstract nature of the music, their performances were largely greeted by full crowds and favorable critical reviews. This week at the Jazz Bakery, a considerably less visible duo--pianist Joanne Brackeen and saxophonist Ravi Coltrane--is taking on a similar task.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2002 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A few years ago, pianist Herbie Hancock and saxophonist Wayne Shorter stepped into a demanding genre of improvisation, performing spontaneously as a duo, with no preset tunes or arrangements. Despite the abstract nature of the music, their performances were largely greeted by full crowds and favorable critical reviews. This week at the Jazz Bakery, a considerably less visible duo--pianist Joanne Brackeen and saxophonist Ravi Coltrane--is taking on a similar task.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 1996 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There's an attractive duality in the play of pianist JoAnne Brackeen. When she improvises, beautifully melodious phrases contrast with echoing abstract lines and/or atonal harmonies to great, dramatic effect. Playing her 21st city in almost as many days, Brackeen was in fine form despite the hectic pace and an unrehearsed drummer and bassist when she opened Tuesday at Catalina Bar & Grill.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 1996 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There's an attractive duality in the play of pianist JoAnne Brackeen. When she improvises, beautifully melodious phrases contrast with echoing abstract lines and/or atonal harmonies to great, dramatic effect. Playing her 21st city in almost as many days, Brackeen was in fine form despite the hectic pace and an unrehearsed drummer and bassist when she opened Tuesday at Catalina Bar & Grill.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 1994 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Joanne Brackeen does what she does so well that it seems brutish to suggest that she should be doing something else. Her performance at the Jazz Bakery on Friday was a brilliant display of contemporary power piano. Much of what she played--especially in originals such as "Picasso"--leaned in the direction of contemporary concert music, often with great effectiveness.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 1992 | DIRK SUTRO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jazz pianist Joanne Brackeen is not well known, so her unabashed confidence may seem brash or cocky to those unfamiliar with her music. But, at 53, Brackeen is in peak form, being compared favorably by critics to the great jazz pianists who came before her. In truth, she's merely a realist in touch with her own substantial abilities.
NEWS
January 17, 2002
8pm Theater In "Fiddler on the Roof," a humble milkman struggles to preserve his family traditions as 20th century pogroms loom. This new touring production of the landmark Joseph Stein-Jerry Bock-Sheldon Harnick musical is something of a tradition for star Theodore Bikel too: He has performed the role more than 1,600 times. Director Sammy Dallas Bayes has re-created Jerome Robbins' original Broadway choreography for the show. "Fiddler on the Roof," Wilshire Theater, 8440 Wilshire Blvd.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2001
SFJazz has announced the lineup for its 19th annual San Francisco Jazz Festival, the West Coast's most comprehensive collection of jazz events. The program runs from Oct. 24 through Nov. 4 at various locations. Among the major artists: Kenny Barron and Regina Carter (Oct. 25), Etta James (Oct. 26), Rosemary Clooney (Oct. 27), Don Byron (Oct. 27 and 28), Bobby Short and his Orchestra (Oct. 28), Bill Frisell (Oct. 29), Charlie Haden's Nocturne (with Gonzalo Rubalcaba and Joe Lovano) (Oct.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 1992 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Joanne Brackeen sits down to play the piano, it's all but impossible to predict what's going to happen, except to say that the performance will be emphatically jazz-rooted and that it will make for exceptionally rewarding listening.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 1994 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Joanne Brackeen does what she does so well that it seems brutish to suggest that she should be doing something else. Her performance at the Jazz Bakery on Friday was a brilliant display of contemporary power piano. Much of what she played--especially in originals such as "Picasso"--leaned in the direction of contemporary concert music, often with great effectiveness.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 1994 | LEONARD REED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The spare New York loft of JoAnne Brackeen is dominated by two grand pianos, facing and tucked into each other, the melding of curves a happy if formidable yin/yang. But nearby, on her wood writing desk, is the image that telegraphs so much more: a photo of Brackeen at the keyboard, characteristically bent forward while summoning canyon-like walls of chords, with a strange fuzzy cloud of light hovering over her. Is it a defect in the print emulsion? An eerie accident of flash lighting?
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 1992 | DIRK SUTRO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jazz pianist Joanne Brackeen is not well known, so her unabashed confidence may seem brash or cocky to those unfamiliar with her music. But, at 53, Brackeen is in peak form, being compared favorably by critics to the great jazz pianists who came before her. In truth, she's merely a realist in touch with her own substantial abilities.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 1991 | LEONARD FEATHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The tenor saxophone has produced a long line of seminal figures in jazz, including Coleman Hawkins (1904-1969), the first pioneer in the 1920s and '30s; Bud Freeman, who died at 84 a few weeks ago; Lester Young (1904-1959) and John Coltrane (1926-1967). Stan Getz, who died Thursday of liver cancer, belonged in this company. Acceptance on this level did not come easily for Getz, whose career started at 15. He quickly graduated to the name bands of Jack Teagarden, Stan Kenton and Benny Goodman.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2002 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It wasn't a planned ensemble or a scored composition, but there was something wonderfully spontaneous and, in its own way, creative about what happened at 6 on Thursday night at the Long Beach Convention Center. It took place at the opening of the exhibit room of the International Assn. for Jazz Education's 29th annual conference, in a large area devoted solely to manufacturers of music instruments and their accessories.
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