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Joanne Carson

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October 31, 2006 | Robin Abcarian, Times Staff Writer
They were an unlikely pair, Joanne Carson and Truman Capote. She was the plucky, gorgeous wife of the man who would become the undisputed king of late-night television. He was the diminutive literary genius whose rapier wit would eventually force him into a kind of social exile from Manhattan. In 1971, the year before her divorce became final, she moved home to California, while Johnny Carson stayed in New York, where his show was then taped.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg
In the December issue of Vanity Fair, which hits shelves this week, readers can get a taste of a missing chapter from Truman Capote's famously unfinished novel, "Answered Prayers. " In Vanity Fair's table of contents, look for the piece by Capote titled "Yachts and Things. " Capote was at work on "Answered Prayers" for almost 20 years. He signed the contract in 1966, which was postponed, renewed and recalculated for larger and larger advances. It is rumored that he was offered $1 million to finally complete his manuscript -- but he couldn't meet the deadline.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg
In the December issue of Vanity Fair, which hits shelves this week, readers can get a taste of a missing chapter from Truman Capote's famously unfinished novel, "Answered Prayers. " In Vanity Fair's table of contents, look for the piece by Capote titled "Yachts and Things. " Capote was at work on "Answered Prayers" for almost 20 years. He signed the contract in 1966, which was postponed, renewed and recalculated for larger and larger advances. It is rumored that he was offered $1 million to finally complete his manuscript -- but he couldn't meet the deadline.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2006 | Robin Abcarian, Times Staff Writer
They were an unlikely pair, Joanne Carson and Truman Capote. She was the plucky, gorgeous wife of the man who would become the undisputed king of late-night television. He was the diminutive literary genius whose rapier wit would eventually force him into a kind of social exile from Manhattan. In 1971, the year before her divorce became final, she moved home to California, while Johnny Carson stayed in New York, where his show was then taped.
NEWS
July 13, 1990
Members of the Los Angeles film and television industry have scheduled a public memorial service for homeless advocate Mitch Snyder at Hollywood Methodist Church, Highland and Franklin avenues, at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday. The tribute is being organized by Joanne Carson and Edward James Olmos, who are planning eulogies by Valerie Harper, Martin Sheen, Lou Gossett and Casey Kasem. Snyder, 46, was found dead July 5, an apparent suicide, in the Washington shelter he founded.
MAGAZINE
January 11, 1998
The Screen Actors Guild files suit, seeking an injunction to stop the showing of bloopers from the "Star Trek" television series. SAG, asking for $25,000 in damages, objects to the bloopers because they are embarrassing to the actors. The bloopers are part of the touring show "Gene Roddenberry's World of Star Trek." * Joanne Carson sues ex-husband Johnny Carson in Los Angeles, claiming he has failed to make alimony payments of $12,500 due at the beginning of December and January.
BUSINESS
December 27, 1989 | David Olmos, Times staff writer
Buyout Limit: An investor group controlling a 7.6% stake in Irvine Sensors Corp. said it would vote against any proposal to acquire the Costa Mesa maker of infrared sensing devices for less than $2.50 a share. The group includes James Alexiou, Joanne S. Carson, John C. Carson, John J. Stuart Jr., Roger W. Powell and Kenneth T. Lian, all residents of Costa Mesa; Walter E. Garrigan of Santa Monica; Thomas H. Lenagh of Westport, Conn.; Frank P. Ragano of Arlington, Va.; and A. Eugene Sapp Jr.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2006 | Robin Abcarian
The resurgent interest in Truman Capote continues. On the heels of Philip Seymour Hoffman's Oscar-winning portrayal of the famously flamboyant author in last year's "Capote" comes "Infamous," a retelling of the story, this time starring Toby Jones. And now, an auction of Capote memorabilia owned by Joanne Carson, the close friend in whose arms he died in 1984. Capote and Carson met at a 1966 dinner party thrown by publishing powerhouse Bennett Cerf.
NEWS
December 19, 1991 | KEVIN ALLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If the scenario sounds familiar, it is: A much-married 50-something British actress/author/perfume spokeswoman performing Noel Coward's "Private Lives." But this time around, it's the redoubtable Joan Collins, not Elizabeth Taylor, and the production (which landed at the Wilshire Theatre in Beverly Hills Tuesday night) was lauded with a starry opening-night reception hosted by the West Hollywood restaurant Orso.
MAGAZINE
January 4, 1987
"Louie, I think this is the beginning of a beautiful friendship." --Humphrey Bogart to Claude Rains in "Casablanca" Groucho Marx and T. S. Eliot. The author of "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock" sent a letter to the host of "You Bet Your Life" in 1961, requesting his portrait. In turn, Groucho asked for Eliot's photograph and commented, "I had no idea you were so handsome.
NEWS
April 11, 1991 | KEVIN ALLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The last time Joanne Carson held a party in her Bel-Air home, it was Halloween, 1988, and someone played a particularly nasty trick by absconding with one of her most valued possessions--the ashes of her dear friend, writer Truman Capote, who had died in the house four years earlier. The ashes were eventually returned under circumstances Carson does not discuss. Tuesday night marked the first time since that night that Carson opened her home for a party. The occasion was the L.A.
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