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Joanne Corday Kozberg

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 1999 | DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After three years of interim leadership, the Music Center of Los Angeles County on Thursday named as its new president Joanne Corday Kozberg, who served as state Secretary of State and Consumer Affairs under former Gov. Pete Wilson. She assumes the post in mid-February. Kozberg, 54, who left the state post in August, served from 1991 to 1993 as executive director of the California Arts Council and was the council's chairwoman from 1989 to 1991.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 1999 | DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After three years of interim leadership, the Music Center of Los Angeles County on Thursday named as its new president Joanne Corday Kozberg, who served as state Secretary of State and Consumer Affairs under former Gov. Pete Wilson. She assumes the post in mid-February. Kozberg, 54, who left the state post in August, served from 1991 to 1993 as executive director of the California Arts Council and was the council's chairwoman from 1989 to 1991.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 1996
The April 1 article criticizing our efforts to save taxpayers' money by closing certain warehouse operations and making state government more competitive missed the mark. More than a year ago, we started the process of reforming how the state buys the $4 billion worth of goods and services it needs each year. To help us, we went to the private sector and asked accounting firms from around the country to submit bids for their work, ultimately selecting the firm of Ernst & Young. Among the first money-saving opportunities we found were warehouse operations in Northern and Southern California that stored and shipped office supplies--pencils, pens, paper, etc.--to government offices around the state.
NEWS
December 30, 1994 | CONNIE KOENENN, Connie Koenenn covers consumer issues for Life & Style
What you don't know can hurt you. That's the message for consumers in 1995 from the California Department of Consumer Affairs. "Too many people don't realize how many laws we have to protect them," says Joanne Corday Kozberg, secretary of the State and Consumer Services Agency. Among the department's New Year's gifts is a 25-minute video, "Rebuilding After a Disaster." It explains why you should hire a licensed contractor for projects costing more than $300. Useful to any homeowner, the tape is available for $2.99 at HomeBase stores, which underwrote the cost of the project.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2001 | DIANE HAITHMAN
TELEVISION Coming to HBO: HBO's much-anticipated miniseries "Band of Brothers" will premiere on the pay cable outlet in September, the network said Friday. The 10-part World War II-era drama, with a budget of more than $100 million and executive produced by Tom Hanks and Steven Spielberg, is based on historian Stephen Ambrose's bestseller. HBO also used the Television Critics Assn. tour in Pasadena to announce that a new half-hour comedy series, "The Mind of the Married Man," will debut in August.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2004 | Peter Y. Hong, Times Staff Writer
The University of California regents clashed sharply over race and admissions practices Thursday as the board narrowly passed a resolution repudiating the views of Chairman John J. Moores, who in a magazine essay this month accused UC of racial discrimination.
BUSINESS
February 9, 1997 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joanne Corday Kozberg nurses a latte in a tiny coffee shop, waiting for the start of one of the last official meetings of the arduous, 21-day trade mission led by Gov. Pete Wilson that ended late last month. Weary from an endless string of official encounters, California's secretary of the State and Consumer Services Agency doesn't realize it, but she's on a roll. Earlier this week, she scored a long-sought memorandum of understanding in Beijing to harmonize construction standards with China.
NEWS
June 2, 1995 | BILL STALL and VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a ceremony strong on symbolism with national political overtones, Gov. Pete Wilson signed an executive order Thursday that he said would help restore the American dream of people getting ahead on their own--without the need of government quotas or preferences. Saying "we're gathered here today to begin a new chapter in the journey toward a colorblind society," Wilson moved to wipe out some of the state's affirmative action programs.
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