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Joao Havelange

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June 7, 1998 | GRAHAME L. JONES
If it seems that Joao Havelange has been in power forever, he has been. Richard Nixon was still in the White House, the Bee Gees--quel horreur!--were still in the top 20 and Shaquille O'Neal was still in diapers--extra-large, no doubt--when the Brazilian was elected president of FIFA. The year was 1974, and at the 39th FIFA Congress in Frankfurt, a couple of days before the Germany '74 World Cup began, Jean Marie Faustin Godefroid Havelange won the vote.
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SPORTS
October 31, 1994 | GRAHAME L. JONES
What really happened at the FIFA meetings in New York last week? On the surface, all seemed to go smoothly, and the leaders of international soccer's governing body said as much at their closing news conference. "There was no rivalry between the confederations," said FIFA President Joao Havelange. "There was a discussion (on allocating World Cup '98 places) and a final decision was reached. It was unanimously adopted, so there was no rivalry."
SPORTS
August 17, 1997 | GRAHAME L. JONES
Now in the final year of his reign as FIFA president, Joao Havelange is losing stature every time he moves his sagging jowls. In his latest nonsensical utterance, Havelange threatened to throw Brazil out of FIFA and to ban the four-time world champion from defending its title in France next summer. All because of an increasingly bitter feud with fellow countryman Pele. But who does Havelange think the world is going to line up behind in this farcical spat?
SPORTS
June 7, 1998 | GRAHAME L. JONES
If it seems that Joao Havelange has been in power forever, he has been. Richard Nixon was still in the White House, the Bee Gees--quel horreur!--were still in the top 20 and Shaquille O'Neal was still in diapers--extra-large, no doubt--when the Brazilian was elected president of FIFA. The year was 1974, and at the 39th FIFA Congress in Frankfurt, a couple of days before the Germany '74 World Cup began, Jean Marie Faustin Godefroid Havelange won the vote.
SPORTS
December 17, 1993 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soccer's international stars will be gathered to participate in Sunday's World Cup draw, but a dispute between the president of FIFA, the sport's international governing body, and Pele, the sport's foremost ambassador, could keep the Brazilian legend from involvement in the show and the sport.
SPORTS
June 17, 1994 | GRAHAME L. JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joao Havelange, the 78-year-old Brazilian who has ruled FIFA, world soccer's governing body, with an iron hand for the last 20 years, was reelected by acclamation to a sixth four-year term Thursday. The dinosaurs at the Field Museum here have smiled more recently than the crusty Havelange, so it was no surprise that he accepted the unanimous approval of the 49th FIFA Congress as no more than his due.
SPORTS
August 14, 1994 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alan Rothenberg narrowly won reelection to his second four-year term as president of the U.S. Soccer Federation on Saturday, thanks in large measure to the intervention of FIFA, the sport's international governing body. Facing a battle for his political life, Rothenberg called in all of his favors. That meant bringing in the most powerful man in soccer, Brazil's Joao Havelange, the FIFA president, who spent the weekend campaigning for Rothenberg.
SPORTS
December 13, 1995 | GRAHAME L. JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A power play Tuesday by FIFA President Joao Havelange all but upstaged the preliminary draw for the 1998 World Cup in France. The draw to divide 172 countries into groups for qualifying play took place at the Louvre in Paris, providing more than a few surprises. But it was Havelange's out-of-the-blue comment that the 2006 World Cup will be played in South Africa that caused the most astonishment.
SPORTS
July 4, 1988 | RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
Twenty-one members of the International Soccer Federation's executive committee will decide today whether the 1994 World Cup will be played in the United States, Brazil or Morocco, but it could be that the only vote that counts belongs to a man who will not vote. Joao Havelange, the powerful president of the Federation Internationale de Football Assn.
SPORTS
December 13, 1995 | GRAHAME L. JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A power play Tuesday by FIFA President Joao Havelange all but upstaged the preliminary draw for the 1998 World Cup in France. The draw to divide 172 countries into groups for qualifying play took place at the Louvre in Paris, providing more than a few surprises. But it was Havelange's out-of-the-blue comment that the 2006 World Cup will be played in South Africa that caused the most astonishment.
SPORTS
October 31, 1994 | GRAHAME L. JONES
What really happened at the FIFA meetings in New York last week? On the surface, all seemed to go smoothly, and the leaders of international soccer's governing body said as much at their closing news conference. "There was no rivalry between the confederations," said FIFA President Joao Havelange. "There was a discussion (on allocating World Cup '98 places) and a final decision was reached. It was unanimously adopted, so there was no rivalry."
SPORTS
August 14, 1994 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alan Rothenberg narrowly won reelection to his second four-year term as president of the U.S. Soccer Federation on Saturday, thanks in large measure to the intervention of FIFA, the sport's international governing body. Facing a battle for his political life, Rothenberg called in all of his favors. That meant bringing in the most powerful man in soccer, Brazil's Joao Havelange, the FIFA president, who spent the weekend campaigning for Rothenberg.
SPORTS
June 17, 1994 | GRAHAME L. JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joao Havelange, the 78-year-old Brazilian who has ruled FIFA, world soccer's governing body, with an iron hand for the last 20 years, was reelected by acclamation to a sixth four-year term Thursday. The dinosaurs at the Field Museum here have smiled more recently than the crusty Havelange, so it was no surprise that he accepted the unanimous approval of the 49th FIFA Congress as no more than his due.
SPORTS
December 17, 1993 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soccer's international stars will be gathered to participate in Sunday's World Cup draw, but a dispute between the president of FIFA, the sport's international governing body, and Pele, the sport's foremost ambassador, could keep the Brazilian legend from involvement in the show and the sport.
SPORTS
August 17, 1997 | GRAHAME L. JONES
Now in the final year of his reign as FIFA president, Joao Havelange is losing stature every time he moves his sagging jowls. In his latest nonsensical utterance, Havelange threatened to throw Brazil out of FIFA and to ban the four-time world champion from defending its title in France next summer. All because of an increasingly bitter feud with fellow countryman Pele. But who does Havelange think the world is going to line up behind in this farcical spat?
SPORTS
December 18, 1985 | GRAHAME L. JONES, Times Staff Writer
Pages from a World Cup notebook . . . It is late on a Friday night. The sun has long since slipped behind the mountains and night lies draped like a dark serape over the Mexican capital. But the city is not asleep. In the Alameda, in the center of town, the brightly lit stalls of the vendors are surrounded by jostling crowds. There are those who have come to buy and those who have come to look.
SPORTS
July 4, 1988 | RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
Twenty-one members of the International Soccer Federation's executive committee will decide today whether the 1994 World Cup will be played in the United States, Brazil or Morocco, but it could be that the only vote that counts belongs to a man who will not vote. Joao Havelange, the powerful president of the Federation Internationale de Football Assn.
SPORTS
December 18, 1985 | GRAHAME L. JONES, Times Staff Writer
Pages from a World Cup notebook . . . It is late on a Friday night. The sun has long since slipped behind the mountains and night lies draped like a dark serape over the Mexican capital. But the city is not asleep. In the Alameda, in the center of town, the brightly lit stalls of the vendors are surrounded by jostling crowds. There are those who have come to buy and those who have come to look.
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