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Joaquim Chissano

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NEWS
March 10, 1990 | Reuters
Mozambique's guerrilla war will top the agenda when President Joaquim Chissano meets President Bush in Washington next Tuesday. "A review of the process toward achieving peace in Mozambique will be at the top of our list," Melissa Wells, the U.S. ambassador in Maputo, said. The visit, Chissano's first to the Bush White House, comes at a crucial time for the African nation. In addition to the 14-year-old civil war, Chissano faces a wave of strikes by workers dissatisfied with a U.S.
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NEWS
October 21, 1990 | From United Press International
The National Assembly unanimously approved articles to a new constitution Saturday, establishing a multi-party political system and ending the ruling Frelimo party's 15-year monopoly on power. The state-run Mozambican news agency AIM reported that legislators voted in favor of five articles establishing political pluralism in the war-ravaged nation, endorsing the political reforms of President Joaquim Chissano aimed at ending a grinding civil war.
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NEWS
October 21, 1990 | From United Press International
The National Assembly unanimously approved articles to a new constitution Saturday, establishing a multi-party political system and ending the ruling Frelimo party's 15-year monopoly on power. The state-run Mozambican news agency AIM reported that legislators voted in favor of five articles establishing political pluralism in the war-ravaged nation, endorsing the political reforms of President Joaquim Chissano aimed at ending a grinding civil war.
NEWS
March 10, 1990 | Reuters
Mozambique's guerrilla war will top the agenda when President Joaquim Chissano meets President Bush in Washington next Tuesday. "A review of the process toward achieving peace in Mozambique will be at the top of our list," Melissa Wells, the U.S. ambassador in Maputo, said. The visit, Chissano's first to the Bush White House, comes at a crucial time for the African nation. In addition to the 14-year-old civil war, Chissano faces a wave of strikes by workers dissatisfied with a U.S.
WORLD
February 3, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Businessman Armando Guebuza was sworn in as Mozambique's president in Maputo's Independence Square, taking over from Joaquim Chissano, who retired after 18 years. The 61-year-old millionaire is the African nation's third president since independence from Portugal in 1975.
NEWS
February 12, 1988 | Associated Press
A U.S. Navy frigate will visit Mozambique from July 22 to 24, the first such visit since that southern African country became independent in 1975, the State Department said Thursday. President Joaquim Chissano invited the Navy to make the port call, the department said.
NEWS
December 14, 1989 | Reuters
South African President Frederik W. de Klerk will visit Maputo on Friday for talks with President Joaquim Chissano, the Mozambican AIM news agency announced Wednesday. De Klerk met Chissano in Maputo last July before he became South Africa's state president.
NEWS
October 6, 1987
President Joaquim Chissano of Mozambique exchanged views with President Reagan in Washington on how to end a civil war between the Marxist African leader's forces and South African-backed guerrillas, an Administration official said. Both a political and military approach is needed to end the conflict, the official added.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1987 | United Press International
Mozambican President Joaquim Chissano discussed prospects for establishing diplomatic relations with the Vatican during a private audience with Pope John Paul II. Chissano on Tuesday also invited the Pope to visit his nation, and Vatican sources said the Pope might include Mozambique in a tour of southern Africa he is planning. The Mozambican president stopped over in Rome on his way to an official visit to Britain.
NEWS
December 1, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A new constitution ending 15 years of Marxist rule and laying the groundwork for Mozambique's first multi-party elections took effect, hours after President Joaquim Chissano urged right-wing guerrillas to join the political mainstream. The constitution abolishes the one-party rule established by the Mozambique Liberation Front when it took power at the end of Portuguese rule in 1975. Chissano appealed earlier to the Mozambique National Resistance to put down its weapons.
NEWS
August 2, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
President Joaquim Chissano announced that for the first time, opposition parties will be allowed to compete for power in Mozambique. The announcement, reported by the government's national news agency AIM, is considered a major concession that could help end the nation's 13-year-old civil war. "It's a positive step," Manuel Frank, Lisbon representative of the Mozambique National Resistance, said in Portugal.
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