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Joaquin Balaguer

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 2002 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joaquin Balaguer, the diminutive poet, president and patriarch who towered over the Dominican Republic through nearly a half-century of turmoil, U.S. occupation and enduring poverty, died Sunday. He was 95. A father figure and kingmaker to the end for his Caribbean nation of 8 million, Balaguer died from heart failure after days on a respirator in a Santo Domingo hospital. "The doctors tried to save him until 4:30 [a.m.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 2002 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joaquin Balaguer, the diminutive poet, president and patriarch who towered over the Dominican Republic through nearly a half-century of turmoil, U.S. occupation and enduring poverty, died Sunday. He was 95. A father figure and kingmaker to the end for his Caribbean nation of 8 million, Balaguer died from heart failure after days on a respirator in a Santo Domingo hospital. "The doctors tried to save him until 4:30 [a.m.
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NEWS
May 12, 2000 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At 93, Joaquin Balaguer is legally blind. He's virtually deaf. He can barely walk. His public appearances are brief and rare. Yet Balaguer may well be the next president of the Dominican Republic--again. Opinion polls in advance of Tuesday's presidential election here show that the authoritarian former leader of this impoverished Caribbean nation could win what would be a record eighth term in office.
NEWS
May 12, 2000 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At 93, Joaquin Balaguer is legally blind. He's virtually deaf. He can barely walk. His public appearances are brief and rare. Yet Balaguer may well be the next president of the Dominican Republic--again. Opinion polls in advance of Tuesday's presidential election here show that the authoritarian former leader of this impoverished Caribbean nation could win what would be a record eighth term in office.
NEWS
June 13, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
President Joaquin Balaguer, 83, won last month's election by fewer than 25,000 votes over challenger Juan Bosch, the Central Electoral Board announced in Santo Domingo. The board issued its final count for the May 16 election, giving Balaguer 35.7% to 34.4% for Bosch. The outcome had been left hanging when the board suspended counting to review tally sheets.
NEWS
August 12, 1987
Dominican Republic President Joaquin Balaguer has asked the majority of his Cabinet to resign, one year after he took office. In a speech on government radio and television, Balaguer said he has given the Cabinet until Aug. 16, the anniversary of its formation, to comply. The 79-year-old leader said he is asking for the resignations in order to facilitate changes deemed necessary after reviewing his administration's first year, but he did not indicate what those changes were.
NEWS
August 17, 1994 | Associated Press
Joaquin Balaguer was sworn in to a seventh term as president Tuesday, facing a reduced two-year term because of allegations of electoral fraud. Balaguer, 87, has been president of the Dominican Republic for 20 of the past 28 years. He agreed last week to reduce his term from four years after opposition politicians and international observers accused him of fraud in the May elections. Balaguer originally agreed to a 1 1/2-year term, but Congress voted Sunday to set his term at two years.
NEWS
August 17, 1990 | Associated Press
President Joaquin Balaguer, beginning his sixth term in office Thursday, defended his austerity plan, which touched off deadly protests this week. The nationwide strike Monday and Tuesday brought this Caribbean nation of 7 million people to a near-standstill. Clashes between protesters and security forces left at least 11 dead and 50 wounded. Police arrested 2,000 protesters. At his inauguration Thursday, Balaguer said the program that prompted the protests is necessary.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1996
The July 4 editorial proclaimed, "New Era for Dominican Republic: A clean election marks the end of Balaguer's long dominance." Really? Everyone agrees this was a clean and fair election. But the party of the newly elected president, Leonel Fernandez, a lawyer raised in New York City, has only one seat in the 30-member Dominican Senate, and 12 out of 120 representatives in the Chamber of Deputies. Control of the Congress remains where it has been for four decades: in the hands of Joaquin Balaguer and his alter ego and fellow octogenarian, Juan Bosch.
NEWS
August 17, 1986 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
Joaquin Balaguer, a conservative historian and poet, was sworn in as president of this Caribbean island republic for the fifth time Saturday with a pledge to fight poverty and official corruption. Balaguer, who first served as president in the early 1960s by appointment of longtime Dominican dictator Rafael Trujillo, accepted the presidential sash again just two weeks short of his 79th birthday, denouncing the Trujillo Era as "30 years of darkness." Trujillo was assassinated in 1961.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1996
The July 4 editorial proclaimed, "New Era for Dominican Republic: A clean election marks the end of Balaguer's long dominance." Really? Everyone agrees this was a clean and fair election. But the party of the newly elected president, Leonel Fernandez, a lawyer raised in New York City, has only one seat in the 30-member Dominican Senate, and 12 out of 120 representatives in the Chamber of Deputies. Control of the Congress remains where it has been for four decades: in the hands of Joaquin Balaguer and his alter ego and fellow octogenarian, Juan Bosch.
NEWS
August 17, 1994 | Associated Press
Joaquin Balaguer was sworn in to a seventh term as president Tuesday, facing a reduced two-year term because of allegations of electoral fraud. Balaguer, 87, has been president of the Dominican Republic for 20 of the past 28 years. He agreed last week to reduce his term from four years after opposition politicians and international observers accused him of fraud in the May elections. Balaguer originally agreed to a 1 1/2-year term, but Congress voted Sunday to set his term at two years.
NEWS
August 17, 1990 | Associated Press
President Joaquin Balaguer, beginning his sixth term in office Thursday, defended his austerity plan, which touched off deadly protests this week. The nationwide strike Monday and Tuesday brought this Caribbean nation of 7 million people to a near-standstill. Clashes between protesters and security forces left at least 11 dead and 50 wounded. Police arrested 2,000 protesters. At his inauguration Thursday, Balaguer said the program that prompted the protests is necessary.
NEWS
June 13, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
President Joaquin Balaguer, 83, won last month's election by fewer than 25,000 votes over challenger Juan Bosch, the Central Electoral Board announced in Santo Domingo. The board issued its final count for the May 16 election, giving Balaguer 35.7% to 34.4% for Bosch. The outcome had been left hanging when the board suspended counting to review tally sheets.
NEWS
May 19, 1990 | DON A. SCHANCHE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former President Jimmy Carter successfully brokered a recount in the Dominican Republic's disputed presidential election before the first vote count even ended Friday, forestalling a potentially violent confrontation between the government and a candidate who appeared to be losing.
NEWS
May 18, 1990 | DON A. SCHANCHE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Blind, 83-year-old President Joaquin Balaguer held a narrow lead late Thursday over his 80-year-old rival, Juan Bosch, but private pollsters cautioned that the vote was so close it could go either way by this morning. With more than half of the country's 7,000 polling places reporting, the independent Central Electoral Board said Balaguer was leading with 386,766 votes--or 34.9%--to Bosch's 375,869--or 33.9%.
NEWS
May 17, 1990 | DON A. SCHANCHE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dominican voters crowded the polls Wednesday in a peaceful election to choose one of two octogenarians to lead this economically hard-pressed country for the next four years. The presidential race appeared to be a toss-up between the incumbent conservative President Joaquin Balaguer, 83, and leftist former President Juan Bosch, 80, facing one another at the polls for the fifth time in the last quarter century.
NEWS
May 19, 1990 | DON A. SCHANCHE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former President Jimmy Carter successfully brokered a recount in the Dominican Republic's disputed presidential election before the first vote count even ended Friday, forestalling a potentially violent confrontation between the government and a candidate who appeared to be losing.
NEWS
May 17, 1990 | DON A. SCHANCHE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dominican voters crowded the polls Wednesday in a peaceful election to choose one of two octogenarians to lead this economically hard-pressed country for the next four years. The presidential race appeared to be a toss-up between the incumbent conservative President Joaquin Balaguer, 83, and leftist former President Juan Bosch, 80, facing one another at the polls for the fifth time in the last quarter century.
NEWS
July 24, 1988 | DON A. SCHANCHE, Times Staff Writer
To his admirers there is a poignant symbolism in the blind old leader's most visible building project, a towering modern lighthouse shaped like a leaning crucifix. The 11-story, $20-million structure will project a high-tech cross of light 8,000 feet into the air, marking the site of the tomb of Christopher Columbus in its massive base and serving as a monument, when it opens in 1992, to the 500th anniversary of the discovery of the Americas.
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