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Joaquin El Chapo Guzman

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NATIONAL
May 6, 2009 | Josh Meyer
The reputed head of Mexico's Sinaloa drug cartel is threatening a more aggressive stance against competitors and law enforcement north of the border, instructing associates to use deadly force, if needed, to protect increasingly contested trafficking operations, authorities said. Such a move by Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman, Mexico's most-wanted fugitive, would mark a turn from the cartel's previous position of largely avoiding violent confrontations in the U.S.
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WORLD
February 24, 2014 | By Richard A. Serrano
WASHINGTON - As Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman sits locked in the basement of a Mexican prison, the U.S. Department of Justice is debating whether to seek the drug lord's extradition to face prosecution in one of several American communities that have indicted the violent Sinaloa cartel on charges of pushing millions of dollars of heroin and cocaine. Federal prosecutors in at least four U.S. cities would like to bring the cartel leader to trial. In Chicago, Guzman and 10 others have been indicted by a federal grand jury in the most sweeping case, accusing the cartel of shipping tons of drugs and threatening to behead the agent in charge of the local Drug Enforcement Administration office.
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WORLD
May 30, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Attorney General Eduardo Medina-Mora said drug lord Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman remains an emblematic figure in the Sinaloa drug cartel but he lost his leadership role while serving a 20-year sentence. Guzman escaped in 2001, and has been on the run. Mexico is offering $2 million and the U.S. $5 million for information leading to Guzman's arrest. Also, a judge ordered 10 mayors and 20 other top officials from Michoacan state held pending an investigation of alleged ties to a drug cartel.
WORLD
February 23, 2014 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Richard A. Serrano and Richard Fausset
The residence where Mexican drug lord Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman apparently had been hiding is a tidy, whitewashed house with spike-topped wrought iron fencing, a heavy metal door and blackened windows. It sits across from a high school and is surrounded by drainage canals that may have been part of a system officials said Guzman used as both a means of escape and to access a network of other homes. Guzman was nothing if not discreet. "I thought the house was empty," a neighbor told The Times on Sunday.
WORLD
March 24, 2011 | By Cecilia Sanchez, Los Angeles Times
Mexican authorities said Wednesday that they had captured a close family member of fugitive billionaire drug kingpin Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman while busting a Sinaloa cartel operation that extended all the way to Ecuador. Victor Manuel Felix was one of 18 people arrested in Mexico and Ecuador, the Mexican Public Security Ministry said. Federal police identified Felix as the father-in-law of Guzman's son as well as the godfather of one of the drug lord's children. That makes Felix and Guzman compadres , or co-fathers, which in Latin America is an especially tight relationship.
WORLD
April 5, 2010 | By Tracy Wilkinson
One of Mexico's top drug lords, a fugitive for years, has given a clandestine interview to a Mexican magazine in which he says he would contemplate suicide rather than be taken alive. Ismael "El Mayo" Zambada says he lives "in panic" of being imprisoned but that if he were eliminated, there would be little impact on the flourishing narcotics trade. The report appears in Sunday's edition of Proceso, Mexico's leading news weekly, and was excerpted on the magazine's website. The author is Julio Scherer Garcia, the magazine's founder and first editor, who is also known for a series of books on drug traffickers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 2012 | By Kate Mather and Richard Winton, Los Angeles Times
In Mexico, the media called her la bonita ("the pretty one") or la chula ( "the beautiful one") or la reina del crimen ("the queen of Mexican crime"). Mexican authorities have long alleged that Anel Violeta Noriega Rios, 27, was a top operative in the La Familia drug cartel working out of the United States. They said that she helped smuggle drugs from Mexico into the United States, once using a gardening company to move drugs brought by sea into Long Beach. But when authorities arrested Noriega Rios at a modest El Monte apartment last week on immigration charges, there were no indications the woman had a 5-million peso reward on her head.
WORLD
May 15, 2011 | By Ken Ellingwood and Alex Renderos, Los Angeles Times
At least 27 people were slain early Sunday in a remote area of northern Guatemala that has become a key base for Mexican drug-trafficking groups, authorities said. Police said a small army of gunmen attacked workers on a coconut farm in the northern province of Peten, a zone that has become increasingly dangerous as Mexican drug smugglers extend operations in Central America to escape a crackdown at home. The victims included 25 men and two women, all of whom were decapitated, according to Jaime Leonel Otzin, director of Guatemala's National Civil Police.
NATIONAL
July 21, 2009 | Richard Marosi
Federal authorities announced indictments Monday against the reputed leaders of Mexico's Gulf cartel and its paramilitary force, the Zetas, accusing them of trafficking tons of cocaine and marijuana from South America through the Texas-Mexico border. Three of the men are identified as the "triumvirate" that manages the far-flung enterprise, dividing its territories among themselves.
WORLD
March 7, 2010 | By Tracy Wilkinson
When Mexico and the United States were entering a landmark free trade agreement 16 years ago, one thing was clear: Mexican farmers would initially find it difficult to compete with heavily subsidized U.S. agricultural products. The solution: Mexico created a special fund to dole out cash to the poorest and smallest farmers. Somewhere along the way, something went wrong. Today, the fund -- far from helping the neediest -- is providing large financial subsidies to the families of notorious drug traffickers and several senior government officials, including the agriculture minister.
WORLD
November 3, 2013 | Tracy Wilkinson
He appears in a restaurant, picks up everyone's tab, then vanishes with his many guards. He stars in his wedding, government officials among the guests. He is captured, then released. Twice. Or maybe not. Joaquin " El Chapo" Guzman, Mexico's most-wanted drug-trafficking fugitive, chalks up more sightings than Elvis. He is everywhere, and nowhere, a long-sought criminal always a step ahead of the law, yet always in sight or mind. A mythology has developed around Guzman, the commander of Mexico's most powerful narcotics network, the so-called Sinaloa cartel, named for the Pacific coast state that is the historic cradle of Mexican drug trafficking.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 2012 | By Kate Mather and Richard Winton, Los Angeles Times
In Mexico, the media called her la bonita ("the pretty one") or la chula ( "the beautiful one") or la reina del crimen ("the queen of Mexican crime"). Mexican authorities have long alleged that Anel Violeta Noriega Rios, 27, was a top operative in the La Familia drug cartel working out of the United States. They said that she helped smuggle drugs from Mexico into the United States, once using a gardening company to move drugs brought by sea into Long Beach. But when authorities arrested Noriega Rios at a modest El Monte apartment last week on immigration charges, there were no indications the woman had a 5-million peso reward on her head.
WORLD
November 27, 2011 | By Ken Ellingwood and Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
The U.S. government has blacklisted more Mexican individuals and companies this year than any other single country or group — and that includes North Korea, Iran, Syria and Al Qaeda. Three hundred Mexicans and 180 Mexican companies are on the so-called kingpin designation list, the Treasury Department's roster of people and entities suspected of laundering money for drug traffickers or working for them in other capacities. U.S. banks, companies and people are barred from doing business with them.
WORLD
May 15, 2011 | By Ken Ellingwood and Alex Renderos, Los Angeles Times
At least 27 people were slain early Sunday in a remote area of northern Guatemala that has become a key base for Mexican drug-trafficking groups, authorities said. Police said a small army of gunmen attacked workers on a coconut farm in the northern province of Peten, a zone that has become increasingly dangerous as Mexican drug smugglers extend operations in Central America to escape a crackdown at home. The victims included 25 men and two women, all of whom were decapitated, according to Jaime Leonel Otzin, director of Guatemala's National Civil Police.
WORLD
March 24, 2011 | By Cecilia Sanchez, Los Angeles Times
Mexican authorities said Wednesday that they had captured a close family member of fugitive billionaire drug kingpin Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman while busting a Sinaloa cartel operation that extended all the way to Ecuador. Victor Manuel Felix was one of 18 people arrested in Mexico and Ecuador, the Mexican Public Security Ministry said. Federal police identified Felix as the father-in-law of Guzman's son as well as the godfather of one of the drug lord's children. That makes Felix and Guzman compadres , or co-fathers, which in Latin America is an especially tight relationship.
WORLD
April 5, 2010 | By Tracy Wilkinson
One of Mexico's top drug lords, a fugitive for years, has given a clandestine interview to a Mexican magazine in which he says he would contemplate suicide rather than be taken alive. Ismael "El Mayo" Zambada says he lives "in panic" of being imprisoned but that if he were eliminated, there would be little impact on the flourishing narcotics trade. The report appears in Sunday's edition of Proceso, Mexico's leading news weekly, and was excerpted on the magazine's website. The author is Julio Scherer Garcia, the magazine's founder and first editor, who is also known for a series of books on drug traffickers.
NEWS
June 11, 1993 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The man widely believed to be Mexico's top drug trafficker and the target of gunmen who mistakenly killed a cardinal and six other people at the Guadalajara airport last month has been arrested, Mexican Atty. Gen. Jorge Carpizo announced Thursday.
WORLD
November 27, 2011 | By Ken Ellingwood and Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
The U.S. government has blacklisted more Mexican individuals and companies this year than any other single country or group — and that includes North Korea, Iran, Syria and Al Qaeda. Three hundred Mexicans and 180 Mexican companies are on the so-called kingpin designation list, the Treasury Department's roster of people and entities suspected of laundering money for drug traffickers or working for them in other capacities. U.S. banks, companies and people are barred from doing business with them.
WORLD
March 7, 2010 | By Tracy Wilkinson
When Mexico and the United States were entering a landmark free trade agreement 16 years ago, one thing was clear: Mexican farmers would initially find it difficult to compete with heavily subsidized U.S. agricultural products. The solution: Mexico created a special fund to dole out cash to the poorest and smallest farmers. Somewhere along the way, something went wrong. Today, the fund -- far from helping the neediest -- is providing large financial subsidies to the families of notorious drug traffickers and several senior government officials, including the agriculture minister.
NATIONAL
July 21, 2009 | Richard Marosi
Federal authorities announced indictments Monday against the reputed leaders of Mexico's Gulf cartel and its paramilitary force, the Zetas, accusing them of trafficking tons of cocaine and marijuana from South America through the Texas-Mexico border. Three of the men are identified as the "triumvirate" that manages the far-flung enterprise, dividing its territories among themselves.
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